Life imitates art: In the film version of V for Vendetta, armoured security guards utterly fail to stop a man wearing a 'Guy Fawkes' mask from invading the HQ of the national broadcaster. These real-life guards had a better time of it against thousands of similarly-masked people yesterday (Wednesday) - because all they wanted to do was take part in a peaceful protest.

Life imitates art: In the film version of V for Vendetta, armoured security guards utterly fail to stop a man wearing a ‘Guy Fawkes’ mask from invading the HQ of the national broadcaster. These real-life guards had a better time of it against thousands of similarly-masked people yesterday (Wednesday) – because all they wanted to do was take part in a peaceful protest.

Now why do you think the BBC’s headquarters at New Broadcasting House were locked down while angry people in masks inspired by V for Vendetta protested outside?

Did BBC bosses feel that the accuracy of their reporting was a thorn in the side of the anonymous thousands outside, who had gathered to protest against austerity, mass surveillance, oppression and unconstitutional government? This is hardly likely, as they could not even get right the identity of the character the marchers were emulating.

The BBC’s news story was headlined Thousands take part in London ‘Guy Fawkes’ protest but the masks are in fact worn in imitation of V, the lead character in Alan Moore’s story about an anarchist who engineers the downfall of a fascist British government in a near-future England (the rest of the UK having been destroyed in a catastrophe). The march takes place on November 5 because that is when V starts his campaign (by blowing up the Houses of Parliament – hence the Guy Fawkes mask that he wears).

This is elementary stuff. It just happens that Yr Obdt Srvt is extremely well-versed in the symbolism, having been one of the few fortunate enough to have read the story when it was first serialised (starting in Warrior, issue one, back in 1982) – but even if this wasn’t the case, any journalist worth their salt should have been able to do the research.

This is the point, though: The BBC doesn’t have any journalists of that calibre, it seems.

Look at the story about the march. After the introduction – that does, yes, mention a little about why it was taking place – the BBC was desperate to report any arrests that had taken place, along with incidents of antisocial behaviour. For example: “Several people threw missiles, including plastic cones and road signs, at the police and several fireworks were let off by people at the base of Nelson’s column.”

Would the BBC even have reported the march if there had been no alleged offences? Here’s a clue: the corporation only reported June’s anti-austerity demonstration – which, again, passed its front door – after receiving an unspecified number of complaints after no mention was made on the main news bulletins of the day.

Perhaps the unpleasantness at the doors of New Broadcasting House could have been avoided if Auntie had been a little more accommodating with her coverage back in the summer?

Of course, the spectacle of multiple armoured security guards defending the headquarters of the UK’s public broadcaster is reminiscent of a scene from the V for Vendetta movie, in which the title character invades a television studio.

Considering the fact that the fictional broadcaster was responsible for pumping government propaganda into the minds of the masses, it’s rather an unfortunate parallel.

BBC executives would have known that, if only they had any journalists who knew how to do the research.

Follow me on Twitter: @MidWalesMike

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