141115zerohours

New figures have revealed the dramatic spread of low-paid, insecure and casual work across the British economy since the financial crash of 2008, according to The Observer.

In that year, one in 20 men and one in 16 women worked in the casualised labour market. Now, one in 12 of both men and women are in precarious employment, which includes zero-hours contracts (ZHCs), agency work, variable hours and fixed-term contracts, according to new TUC data.

According to the analysis, in 2008 there were 655,000 men in the casualised labour market. That number has risen by 61.8% to 1.06 million. The casualised female workforce has increased by 35.6%, from 795,000 in 2008 to 1.08 million in 2014.

The TUC is also publishing research showing that since 2008, only one in 40 new jobs has been full-time. Over the same period, 60% of net jobs added have been self-employed and 36% have been part-time.

More information is in the article – give it a visit.

Thanks to Nick Rhodes for editing the graph showing the rise of food bank use, to add in the most recent increases. The height of the image speaks for itself - no wonder the Conservatives had to devise a new excuse for it.

Thanks to Nick Rhodes for editing the graph showing the rise of food bank use, to add in the most recent increases. The height of the image speaks for itself – no wonder the Conservatives had to devise a new excuse for it.

Interestingly, the article does not mention the contribution made by zero-hours contracts and low-paid work to the rise of food banks.

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