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The last spineless character David Cameron met was the jellyfish that stung him in April 2014 - https://mikesivier.wordpress.com/2014/04/18/jellyfish-in-intensive-care-after-coming-into-contact-with-david-cameron/ The label could equally be attached to Cameron himself; he was notoriously unable to sack Iain Duncan Smith from his post as Work and Pensions Secretary in 2012.

The last spineless character David Cameron met was the jellyfish that stung him in April 2014 – https://mikesivier.wordpress.com/2014/04/18/jellyfish-in-intensive-care-after-coming-into-contact-with-david-cameron/
The label could equally be attached to Cameron himself; he was notoriously unable to sack Iain Duncan Smith from his post as Work and Pensions Secretary in 2012.

David Cameron probably thought he was dealing a death-blow to Labour in Scotland by telling Gaelic Tories that Ed Miliband was “weak and spinless” – and willing to do a deal with the SNP.

In fact, he may have given Scottish Labour a boost.

Think about it; the SNP has been telling everyone that Labour in Scotland is pointless and that the SNP should have the people’s vote – while simultaneously saying they’ll happily do a deal with UK Labour that will put Mr Miliband into Downing Street. They’ve been tying themselves in knots over this for weeks.

Labour backbenchers have been saying they’re suspicious of any such deal, as the SNP would ransom key policy votes in order to gain an advantage for its own aim – independence – and would probably abandon any alliance at the worst possible time for Labour.

Now Cameron comes blundering in, saying things like, “they would wrap themselves in the flag one minute, and the next be prepared to work with a bunch of people who would rip up that flag given half a chance”.

So now, nobody in the Labour Party wants to make a deal with the SNP!

This means anybody in Scotland who votes SNP must do so in the knowledge that their party will not have any say in the future running of the UK.

If they don’t want another five years of Conservatives – and the Scots really don’t want that – but they do want a say in the way the UK is run, then they’ll be far better-off voting Labour.

BLAM! Cameron, shooting his mouth off again, manages to hit himself in the foot. Again.

Incidentally, if Ed Miliband is weak, how does Cameron account for his achievement in changing government policy on bombing Syria – from the Opposition benches? Mr Miliband is the only Opposition leader to achieve this feat in living memory. That is strength – not weakness.

If Ed Miliband is weak, how did he manage to force energy companies into cutting their tariffs? Clearly they believed he was serious in his threat to freeze energy bills.

If he is weak, how did he manage to stand up to the right-wing press – particularly over the smear campaign against his father – but also in general?

If Mr Miliband is weak, why is it Cameron who has lowered himself to name-calling?

He also told the one-day Scottish Tory Conference (presumably there aren’t enough of them to stretch the agenda any further) a bunch of lies about the benefit cap and Universal Credit making work pay when in fact it is depressing wages.

“We’ve won for Britain before – now let’s win for Britain again,” he said – another lie.

Cameron has never won a general election. He needed the help of the Liberal Democrats to get into office last time.

He’ll need a lot more help than that to win a majority this time.

Follow me on Twitter: @MidWalesMike

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