David Cameron was terrified of going on TV debates with Ed Miliband, despite describing the previous Labour leader as "Weak, weak, weak". Can we expect any better, now that Jeremy Corbyn is challenging him to annual confrontations?

David Cameron was terrified of going on TV debates with Ed Miliband, despite describing the previous Labour leader as “Weak, weak, weak”. Can we expect any better, now that Jeremy Corbyn is challenging him to annual confrontations?

Mr Corbyn is turning up the pressure.

David Cameron ran away from the televised debates during the run-up to the 2015 general election, prompting many social media images associating him with a chicken (it seems the PR PM cannot get away from farmyard animals; he is now more popularly associated with pigs) – such as the image above.

Already on the back foot due to the Conservative Government’s pathetic handling of flood risk in the UK, it seems Cameron has been served notice that the remainder of his tenure in 10 Downing Street will not be comfortable.

Good.

Jeremy Corbyn has challenged David Cameron to take part in an annual, televised “state of the nation” debate between Britain’s national political leaders. The Labour leader told The Independent that he hoped the Prime Minister would sign up to a cross-party initiative to debate the dominant issues of the year and allow party leaders to be questioned by voters. He said that “no political leader should shrink from the chance to engage more fully with the public” and to “test their arguments in debate”.

Such an event, he added, would help the public to “engage more in politics in way that has been shown to be effective”. Labour sources suggested that, if such a debate had been held this year, topics for questions might have included Syrian air strikes, tax credits and the recent flooding in northern Britain.

The Independent approached the Scottish National Party leader, Nicola Sturgeon, and her Liberal Democrat counterpart, Tim Farron, to ask if they would participate. Both said they would endorse Mr Corbyn’s plan and take part in the debates if Mr Cameron agreed. Last night, a No 10 source said it would be prepared to “look at the formal details of any proposal”.

Mr Corbyn’s move comes after an academic study of the televised debates that took place during the last general election campaign found that they had an overwhelmingly positive effect on voter engagement.

Source: Jeremy Corbyn challenges David Cameron to annual TV debate | UK Politics | News | The Independent

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