The newly appointed foreign secretary, Boris Johnson, waves as he leaves 10 Downing Street [Image: Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images].

The newly appointed foreign secretary, Boris Johnson, waves as he leaves 10 Downing Street [Image: Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images].

These are the comments I’ve been seeing on Twitter since Boris Johnson was announced as the UK’s new foreign secretary, by no-mandate prime minister Theresa May.

“Dear Rest of the World, we apologise in advance for Boris Johnson. Yours, UK.”

“Boris Johnson is now Foreign Secretary. Of our country. The face of the nation around the world. Let’s just let that sink in for a moment.”

“Appointing Johnson as Foreign Secretary is an appointment of such stupidity that does not bode well.”

It really doesn’t. In fact, it’s only a matter of time before he causes a major diplomatic incident, as this tweet reminds us:

“Britain’s new foreign secretary published this poem about Turkey’s President Erdogan in May.” http://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2016/05/boris-johnson-wins-the-spectators-president-erdogan-offensive-poetry-competition/

160714 BoJob offensive poem

Some have speculated that this shows terrific political nous on the part of no-mandate May, who was voted in as PM by 199 Conservative MPs, making her election perhaps the least democratic ever in the history of the UK. “Give him enough rope…” they say.

Give this one enough rope and he’ll hang us all.

It isn’t a clever move; it’s a matter of political expedience. May had to give BoJob a job to appease Brexiters who wanted some of their number in the cabinet.

She decided to give him a portfolio for which (as another Twitter friend put it) the only worse candidates would have been Nigel Farage or Prince Philip, neither of whom happen to be Conservative MPs.

It isn’t a sign of intelligence; it is a sign of our new prime minister’s weakness.

Philip Hammond has been appointed chancellor of the exchequer and Boris Johnson foreign secretary as Theresa May allocated the top posts in her cabinet on her first evening as prime minister.

Hammond, who was foreign secretary, was the first to be appointed and replaces George Osborne, who was fired from the government, Downing Street announced.

The second major appointment – and a much more unexpected one – was Johnson as foreign secretary.

Source: Theresa May unveils cabinet, with Hammond and Johnson in top jobs | Politics | The Guardian

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