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Peter Tatchell and friends disrupt Jeremy Corbyn’s speech marking the anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights – for no very good reason.

Who can disagree with the Twitter user who asked: “Why is #PeterTatchell protesting Corbyn at a #HumanRightsDay event? Why isn’t he protesting against May”?

The human rights campaigner disrupted a speech by Mr Corbyn at an event to mark the anniversary of the United Nations general assembly signing the universal declaration of human rights in 1948.

He demanded that Labour should call for humanitarian aid to be sent to Aleppo by air, and fellow protesters brandished posters calling for sanctions against Russia, for bombing the city.

“We do think there should be aid given to the people in Aleppo; we do think the bombing should end; we do think there should be a ceasefire; we do think there should be a political solution; we do think the war should end in Syria.”

Mr Corbyn was, quite naturally, taken by surprise. He left the platform to seek advice, then returned to put the record straight.

He said: “Emily Thornberry, on our behalf, during Foreign Office questions and on many other occasions, has made it absolutely clear that we do think there should be aid given to the people in Aleppo; we do think the bombing should end; we do think there should be a ceasefire; we do think there should be a political solution; we do think the war should end in Syria. We are absolutely supporting the people.”

In other words, Mr Tatchell was absolutely wrong to be protesting against the Labour leader on this matter.

Why hasn’t he launched highly visible public protests against Theresa May, whose government voted for the Royal Air Force to launch air strikes on Syrian targets last year?

Possibly the worst aspect of this is that it has allowed unscrupulous individuals in the mass media – and social media – to take Mr Corbyn’s words out of context.

At one point, off-stage, he can be heard asking, “When did we condemn the bombing?”

Taken out of context, that could be used to suggest he was saying Labour had not done so. In fact, he was simply asking for clarity on when it happened.

This was a shameful, turncoat display by Mr Tatchell, who should have known better. What induced him to do it?

Protesters led by Peter Tatchell have disrupted a speech by Jeremy Corbyn, calling on the Labour leader to demand action to end the conflict in Syria.

Corbyn halted his speech while several protesters held up banners with slogans including “Step up and demand action in Syria” and “End the suffering in Aleppo”.

Tatchell, a human rights campaigner who has previously supported the Labour party, shouted over the party leader to demand he do more to condemn the actions of Russia in the Syrian conflict.

As the protesters stood silently in front of Corbyn, the Labour leader said: “It’s all right, it’s OK.”

Source: Peter Tatchell disrupts Jeremy Corbyn speech with Syria protest | UK news | The Guardian

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