The so-called prime minister’s thinking is so confused over Brexit that even the ‘small-c’ conservative Spectator magazine has started calling her ‘Theresa Maybe’.

What strange behaviour.

Perhaps Fowler is taking the ‘long’ view – that stuffing the Lords with Tories will bring both the Upper House and the Conservative Government into disrepute, turn public opinion against them both and, ultimately, lead to the abolition of both.

Perhaps he simply doesn’t want her to close down what has been a nice little earner – what is it, £300 a day? – for him and his chums, of any political persuasion.

The problem is that politicians in both Houses of Parliament seem to be trying to deny their responsibility, which is to ensure that any legislation for the UK to leave the European Union should be drafted to support the best interests of the British people, within that criterion.

So the Labour Party should not be saying it will not block or delay Brexit without knowing what the Conservatives have in mind, and the Lords should not say the same, simply to save their hefty salaries. That is not public service.

Worst of all, of course, is the fact that Theresa May simply does not know what the United Kingdom needs to get from leaving the EU.

She isn’t even paying attention to the fact that the Northern Ireland peace process is threatened by it and, apparently, has done nothing to ensure that it continues to operate as intended.

Politicians took glee misquoting Brexit as ‘breakfast’ during their party conferences last year. With such idiocy at Westminster – and with no experienced negotiators in Brussels – can anybody doubt that Brexit will indeed be a dog’s breakfast, when it finally happens?

Theresa May has been urged by the House of Lords Speaker not to stuff the upper chamber with Tory peers or threaten it with abolition to ensure her Brexit plans get through Parliament.

Lord Fowler said the Lords would not “sabotage” Brexit, although he insisted peers must keep their role in “improving” legislation from the Commons.

His intervention comes as the Prime Minister awaits a Supreme Court ruling expected this month on whether she must get Parliament’s approval before triggering the formal Brexit process under Article 50 of the EU treaties.

If the court rules against the Government, Mrs May expects legislation to approve the triggering of Article 50 to pass through the Commons, given Labour’s commitment not to block or delay Brexit.

But there have been suggestions that the PM’s plan to begin the process by April may be held up in the Lords, where the Tories do not have a majority, by anti-Brexit peers.

Source: May ‘must not threaten Lords with abolition to get Brexit plans passed’

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