Whatever Theresa May’s Brexit speech contains, it can’t possibly be worse than the racist ‘go home’ message on her vans in 2013. Or can it? [Image: Home Office/PA.]

I’ve been trying to puzzle this one out for a while, but I can’t see how it benefits Theresa May or the Tories to make a big speech about Brexit on January 17, before a Supreme Court ruling.

Has she found a way to placate her unruly backbenchers or will she simply utter more of the usual meaningless nothings?

We’re told the speech will reveal “more details” of her plans – a misleading claim, as we don’t have any real facts at all, yet. But she can’t make concrete plans before the Supreme Court ruling, and she would be insane to say anything that would upset her backbenchers, who remain fanatically split over the European question.

If she says she’ll lead the UK out of the single market, in order to curb immigration (as many believe), she’ll anger one section of her party that fervently supports free trade with the continent.

If she says she’ll negotiate to remain in the single market, she’ll anger the anti-immigrationists.

Whatever she says, the Pound will probably nosedive, meaning businesses outside the FTSE100 (most of whom make their money in dollars and therefore profit from a drop in Sterling) will have to find the cash for even higher import prices. How will they cope if taxation is added to the cost?

The only explanation that This Writer can foresee is that Mrs May is preparing to offer us the worst possible deal, in the hope that we’ll think anything will be better. Is that the answer?

Theresa May will finally lift the lid on her Brexit strategy next week – possibly just days before a crucial Supreme Court ruling on whether Parliament must give its consent to leaving the EU.

A long-awaited speech – which, the Prime Minister promised, would reveal “more details” of her plans – will be made next Tuesday, it was announced.

Downing Street has decided to get ahead of a likely defeat in the Supreme Court, which is expected to confirm that MPs and peers must approve the triggering of the Article 50 exit clause.

Source: Theresa May will make her long-awaited Brexit speech next week

Join the Vox Political Facebook page.

If you have appreciated this article, don’t forget to share it using the buttons at the bottom of this page. Politics is about everybody – so let’s try to get everybody involved!

Vox Political needs your help!
If you want to support this site
(
but don’t want to give your money to advertisers)
you can make a one-off donation here:

Donate Button with Credit Cards

Buy Vox Political books so we can continue
fighting for the facts.


The Livingstone Presumption is now available
in either print or eBook format here:

HWG PrintHWG eBook

Health Warning: Government! is now available
in either print or eBook format here:

HWG PrintHWG eBook

The first collection, Strong Words and Hard Times,
is still available in either print or eBook format here:

SWAHTprint SWAHTeBook