Daesh claims Khalid Masood was one of its soldiers.

The second point (below) certainly rings true – just because terrorists claim a crime as one of theirs, that doesn’t make it so.

I wondered why it took the ‘Islamic State’ mob so long to claim responsibility, and I notice that they only said that Masood was answering their call to arms – not that he was an official member.

On Masood’s side, there is no evidence at all to suggest that this is true.

I’m afraid that leads to questions about the behaviour of the mainstream media.

Back in the bad old days of IRA bombings and who-knows-what-else, would they have been so quick to blame an incident on terrorists? Or would they have waited for confirmation before stirring everybody into hysteria?

It all seems extremely suspicious. Doesn’t it?

After lengthy investigation – and it would appear some very reckless and unjustified arrests in a big show of looking ‘in control’ – the police have concluded that the Westminster Attacker, Khalid Masood, acted alone when he took the lives of five people this week.

The media, and many in the wider public, seem to have determined for themselves that Masood, nèe Adrian Ajao, was a Radical Islamic terrorist operating on behalf of the Islamic State of Iraq & Levant (ISIL/’Daesh’). That is a perfectly understandable conclusion to draw. Although born and raised a Christian, he converted to Islam at some point probably between 2001 and 2004. His method of killing, involving driving a vehicle into a crowd of people on Westminster Bridge, has very loud echoes of last year’s attacks in Nice and Berlin. And of course Daesh have claimed Masood as one of their own, calling him “a soldier of the Caliphate”.

Firstly, after the aforementioned investigations concluded that Masood acted alone, it is perhaps a little difficult to reason exactly how or when he had been radicalised.

Secondly, it is high time everybody grasped that just because Daesh claim a crime as one of their own, that does not mean that it genuinely is.

The truth is, as yet, no one really knows precisely why Masood did what he did, because he did not appear to leave an explanation behind for it. This may sound like a minor point, but it is fairly important to my mind, because it is where his modus operandi deviates from the norm; it is quite unusual for a Radical Islamist not to leave behind an explanation, usually by video recording, for his actions.

The possibility is that Khalid Masood was just an unstable man who, having spent some years battling to bury old impulses, finally reached the end of his tether. He may simply have been carrying out a mindless act of last-gasp despair similar to the massacre by Derrick Bird in Cumbria a few years ago.

Nobody called Bird a terrorist, or assumed some kind of ideological motive for the Cumbria Shootings. Given Masood was attempting to force a way into Parliament, it seems more likely in his case, but we should at least be cautious about it.

Impatient guessing games will only reveal more about the people playing them than they will ever reveal about Khalid Masood.

Source: Stop calling Khalid Masood a ‘Radical Islamist’. We do not yet know if he was | TheCritique Archives

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