Andrea Leadsom, leader of the House of Commons, will issue a statement on the timing of the Queen’s Speech “in due course”. When’s that, then? [Image: AP.]

According to Downing Street, The Queen’s Speech may be delayed and may not take place next Monday (June 19). It follows that the state opening of Parliament may also be delayed.

The reason given is that Brexit negotiations are due to start on the same day.

But we are also being told those talks could be delayed – because of the Queen’s Speech!

What are we supposed to believe?

Well, according to the Cabinet Manuel, in a hung Parliament such as we have at the moment the incumbent Prime Minister – Theresa May – is entitled to attempt to form a government and remain in office until Parliament meets for the first time. Then the PM must ask Parliament to approve their version of the Queen’s Speech – the programme of Parliamentary activity.

If the Queen’s Speech put forward by the incumbent PM is voted down – or if it becomes clear in the run-up to the Queen’s Speech that the PM will not gain the support of a majority of MPs for the legislative programme it sets out, then the government is expected to resign.

So delaying the Queen’s Speech means Theresa May can remain in government without having the support of a Parliamentary majority – at least for the time being.

Why do it? There are some obvious conclusions to be drawn:

The Brexit excuse doesn’t ring true, as it is possible that those talks could be delayed.

We must consider other possibilities.

Doesn’t it seem far more likely that Mrs May is unlikely to get her deal with the DUP and is scrabbling for time to find another ally?

It has been reported that the 13 new Scottish Conservative MPs are determined that any deal with the DUP will not lead to any retreat on gay rights or equal marriage policies – but the DUP is strongly opposed to both. There are other openly gay Tory MPs who may also object.

And the DUP’s connections with terrorism open another can of worms after Mrs May fought her election campaign with claims that Jeremy Corbyn had links with terrorists.

The trouble is, her list of possible allies is extremely short. Most parties would happily form a ‘progressive alliance’ against the Tories.

But the delay allows her to hang on – not forever, but for a limited time – and that means she’ll try to do as much damage as she still can.

Join the Vox Political Facebook page.

If you have appreciated this article, don’t forget to share it using the buttons at the bottom of this page. Politics is about everybody – so let’s try to get everybody involved!

Vox Political needs your help!
If you want to support this site
(
but don’t want to give your money to advertisers)
you can make a one-off donation here:

Donate Button with Credit Cards

Buy Vox Political books so we can continue
fighting for the facts.


The Livingstone Presumption is now available
in either print or eBook format here:

HWG PrintHWG eBook

Health Warning: Government! is now available
in either print or eBook format here:

HWG PrintHWG eBook

The first collection, Strong Words and Hard Times,
is still available in either print or eBook format here:

SWAHTprint SWAHTeBook