[Image: Chris Riddell.]

“@CCHQ will the MPs under investigation for sexual harassment still deal with constituents? If so what protections will be put in place?”

It isn’t my question, but it is vital.

We do not know whether any of the allegations against any of the public representatives who have been named in the recent spate of sex-related scandals are true.

Political parties can only suspend their MPs from the party whip, so they remain entitled to represent their constituents, and that means they are allowed to meet their constituents.

Considering what we know about Michael Fallon, Stephen Crabb, Mark Garnier… is it wise to allow this to continue?

Now Mr Crabb is under investigation by the Tory Party’s disciplinary panel, just days after it was set up, along with fellow Tories Dan Poulter and Daniel Kawczynski.

Mr Crabb is accused of “sexting” a woman after refusing her application for a job at his office.

Daniel Kawczynski had been referred to the panel for investigation over allegations he had put pressure on a female colleague to go on a “date” with a business contact.

Dan Poulter was referred to the panel over allegations of improper conduct towards female party colleagues. It is alleged he put his hand up their skirts.

All three are on the so-called Tory Sleaze spreadsheet.

Also on the spreadsheet is Charlie Elphicke, who has been suspended after “serious allegations” that have been referred to the police.

In the Labour Party, Kelvin Hopkins, Clive Lewis and Ivan Lewis are all under investigation.

The Scottish National Party has launched investigations into the activities of – it is believed – two male Parliamentarians.

That comes to 41 MPs – more than one-sixteenth of the total membership of the House of Commons.

And there’s more: The Mirror has reported an incident in which an unnamed Conservative MP allegedly tried to sexually assault a male Labour MP, in an incident that may have involved a date-rape drug.

How many more incidents have happened, but we just don’t know about them yet?

And in such times:

Isn’t it right that any meeting between an MP and a member of the public should happen in the presence of an independent witness – at the very least?


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