Theresa May visited the burned-out ruin of Grenfell Tower shortly after the tragedy took place, alongside firefighters. Did she warn them not to accuse her, too?

What’s worse – the group who built and burned an effigy of Grenfell Tower with windows depicting Muslims and black people, or the Prime Minister who forced investigators into the cause of the real Grenfell Tower blaze to sign an agreement not to do anything to make her look bad?

Okay, sorry – trick question.

It’s quite clearly Theresa May.

Sure, the creation of a model of the destroyed tower block, and its burning-in-effigy by racists was abhorrent.

But Mrs May imposed a non-disclosure agreement on engineering company WSP, indicating that she had at least one guilty secret that she did not want to fall into public hands.

You see, you don’t gag companies from saying anything to criticise or embarrass you unless you know they might find something that will make them want to.

And when the gagged company is investigating a tragedy that caused the deaths of 72 people (according to official records), any such embarrassment or criticism may have an extremely serious – by which I mean criminal – dimension.

According to The Times, “Experts hired by the government to test cladding 12 days after the Grenfell Tower fire were banned from criticising Theresa May or doing anything to embarrass her.

“The engineering company WSP agreed to the terms when it was appointed to analyse the safety of government buildings in the days after the disaster.

“WSP’s contract stated that it must not create “adverse publicity” about the Cabinet Office or other Crown bodies, a group of organisations that includes the prime minister’s office.

“The agreement was made while Mrs May faced criticism for her response to the death of 72 people in the fire.”

The same newspaper reported last month that “Theresa May pledged to bring forward measures to toughen regulation of gagging clauses after MPs and campaigners criticised a ban on the publication of allegations of “sexual harassment” involving a company boss.

“The prime minister said yesterday that some employers were using non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) ‘unethically’.”

She never mentioned that she was one of them.

Now that the cat’s out of the bag, Labour’s Jon Trickett had this to say:

“Coming just a few weeks after the Prime Minister promised to get tough on gagging clauses, these shocking revelations show the Government to be deeply hypocritical as well as paranoid.

“Civil society organisations are often best placed to speak out when Government gets it wrong. When they can’t, our democracy is worse off for it.

“The Conservatives seem to regard this as a fair price to avoid bad headlines, yet it’s public money that pays for it and it’s the public interest that suffers.”

Damn straight.

And now that we know what Mrs May has done, we need to know what she forced the engineers to hide.

Then a criminal investigation and prosecution may be required against the prime minister of the United Kingdom.

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