Tag Archives: Bernie Sanders

Donald Trump has been elected President – some reactions

161109-it-crowd-fire

People are being witty and insightful about the election of Donald Trump.

As This Writer is neither witty nor insightful today, here’s what they had to say, starting with a US citizen commenting on the biggest political mistake of the year – before the US election:

At least two Brits agree:

https://twitter.com/Barkercartoons/status/796282504303050752

What does it mean?

https://twitter.com/MxJackMonroe/status/796270135749255168

https://twitter.com/MxJackMonroe/status/796275010629406720

Hillary Clinton comes in for some (deserved) criticism:

https://twitter.com/UtopianFireman/status/796263160588156932

Amazingly, the markets are stable:

But it seems the US population is not:

My own opinion on the unreliability of the mass media seem confirmed here:

And also on polling:

They won’t, Steve.

Let’s all remember this, next time the polls say Jeremy Corbyn is dozens of points behind the Tories, eh? There’ll be an agenda behind that result.

Some people appear to agree that it is the political situation that led to Trump’s candidacy that should take much of the blame for his election:

There have been some oddities as well. CNN quoted @VanJones68: “This was a whitelash against a changing country”. So what, exactly, is a “blacklash”, apart from an obscure Marvel Comics supervillain?

And the future? I like this:

And this:

And, indeed, this:

But I’m far less enthused by this:

And this:

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US presidential has-been attacks future UK prime minister. Awkward…

Bill Clinton at a campaign rally at North Carolina State University - with Lady Gaga, whose stage name is highly appropriate to the comments attributed to the ex-president [Image: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images].

Bill Clinton at a campaign rally at North Carolina State University – with Lady Gaga, whose stage name is highly appropriate to the comments attributed to the ex-president [Image: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images].

Ex-President Bill Clinton’s comments, made at a speech last October, have to be taken in the context of the US election taking place at the moment.

If I recall correctly, Bernie Sanders was a candidate for the Democrat nomination at the time, and Mr Corbyn has expressed support for him in the past. Mr Sanders was the closest the US has come to nominating a socialist presidential candidate (although that’s not saying much).

Also, of course, Donald Trump was seeking the Republican nomination, which he eventually secured.

And Mr Clinton was speaking in support of his own wife Hillary.

But he has also undermined himself by referring to a conversation with a former Northern Ireland Secretary who praised Mrs Clinton for helping him through a different period for that part of the UK.

Mr Clinton seems to have assumed it was a cabinet minister in David Cameron’s Coalition government but, according to The Guardian, it is more likely to have been Shaun Woodward, who was NI secretary under Gordon Brown.

So Mr Clinton seems more than a little confused and Jeremy Corbyn’s office is probably right to ignore what he says.

Jeremy Corbyn was chosen as Labour’s leader because he was “the maddest person in the room”, former US President Bill Clinton has declared.

Documents published by Wikileaks reveal that Clinton claimed Labour party members were so furious at being “shafted” by Tony Blair that “they went out and practically got a guy off the street” instead.

The explosive remarks, to a private dinner of wealthy donors in October 2015, show the former President comparing Corbyn to leaders of anti-austerity parties like Greece’s Syriza.

The documents – part of a raft of leaks designed to undermine Hillary Clinton’s Presidential bid – reveal that he also attacked Ed Miliband for being too left wing for British voters.

When contacted by HuffPost UK, Corbyn’s office refused to comment on the remarks.

Corbyn has in the past voiced his support for Bernie Sanders, and claimed that he had helped shift Hillary leftwards on issues such as free trade.

Source: Bill Clinton Says Jeremy Corbyn Was ‘The Maddest Person In The Room’ When Labour Chose Its Leader | Huffington Post

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US election race: Bernie Sanders beating Hillary Clinton in Democratic Primary poll

Force for change: Bernie Sanders has overwhelmingly won the support of young and low-income Democratic Party voters [Image: Getty].

Force for change: Bernie Sanders has overwhelmingly won the support of young and low-income Democratic Party voters [Image: Getty].


Is anybody else seeing encouraging parallels between the rise of Bernie Sanders and that of Jeremy Corbyn in the UK?

Both unashamedly describe themselves as “socialist”. Both have won the support and enthusiasm of people on low incomes and young voters, despite being much older men themselves.

Both are challenging the current political and economic consensus.

160217sanders-savings-piccie

In the States, Mr Sanders’ challenge to Hillary Clinton is being taken seriously, with her campaign taking a swing to the left-wing in response – but this shows that all the initiative is on his side.

Here, the Tory-owned press has been slow to accept that Mr Corbyn poses any real challenge, despite the fact that the Conservative Government’s policies have proven to be self-serving foolishness.

It will be interesting, therefore, to observe the progress of the US election campaign.

While Mr Sanders has a huge amount of grassroots support, and it is growing, Ms Clinton has arranged for a large number of delegates to support her at the nominating convention, when the name of the Democratic Presidential candidate will be decided.

She has stronger connections with the Democratic Party establishment, you see – having been the wife of one president, and having held an office in the administration of another.

You may feel that this is an underhand, un-Democratic way to win a nomination, if it succeeds. Also, would the Democrats lose popular support if they name Hillary Clinton over the man who is making all the headway?

More importantly for those of us on the eastern side of the Atlantic, will Jeremy Corbyn’s fortunes echo those of Bernie Sanders – for better or worse?

Bernie Sanders is beating Hillary Clinton in a nationwide opinion poll of likely Democratic primary voters for the first time.

The Fox News survey has Mr Sanders on 47 per cent among likely voters and Ms Clinton trailing three points behind on 44 per cent.

The independent socialist senator from Vermont is up from ten points from 37 per cent in January while the former First Lady and Secretary of State is down five points from 49 per cent a month ago.

The poll is by definition an outlier – but suggests a closing gap between the two candidates in the race.

Ms Clinton’s overall lead in news network CNN’s polling average has narrowed to just six points.

Mr Sanders, a self-described democratic socialist, has ridden a wave of support from young and low income people to run the Demoratic establishment candidate favourite close.

Source: Bernie Sanders beating Hillary Clinton in Democratic Primary poll for the first time ever | UK Politics | News | The Independent

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