Tag Archives: Bosnia

I was in Bosnia in the 1990s. Boris Johnson’s comment about Muslims there is an outrage

Boris Johnson: he doesn’t care about Muslims who died 25 years ago. He probably thinks they were just another bunch of heathens. But he’ll watch you die and then talk about you the same way he referred to them.

I don’t care if he wrote it 23 years ago – Boris Johnson should have been apologising to Bosnian Muslims ever since.

Writing about the Srebrenica massacre, which happened 25 years ago today (July 11), Johnson stated in 1997: “They weren’t exactly angels, these Muslims.”

It’s yet another example of England’s Shame being unable to hold his tongue, therefore proving his imbecility to the world.

Let’s go over the details for those who may not be aware of them: a quarter of a century ago, Serbs led by Ratko Mladic murdered 8,000 Muslims who had sought refuge from them in Srebrenica, which the UN was trying to protect with Dutch forces.

Even Johnson has admitted it was the worst massacre on European soil since World War II.

I was in Bosnia in the 1990s and I think I understand why he said Bosnian Muslims weren’t angels.

You see, when violence broke out in the former Yugoslavia, Muslim Bosnia had no army to call its own and therefore no weapons with which to fend off other former Yugoslav countries’ armies of extermination.

So when the tanks rolled into their towns, they dispersed into the hills…

And when night fell, they came back down and used every means at their disposal to obtain weapons. That required them to do extreme violence to their Serb occupiers – some with their bare hands, some with kitchen knives.

It was that or death.

And it was a war of attrition. As the Bosnian Muslims gained weapons, they used them to gain more – and heavier – arms until they were eventually able to force out the occupiers.

That is how the war was explained to me. It was not without risks for those Bosnian Muslims, but I notice that Johnson said nothing about the reprisals suffered by any who were caught.

I could tell you about incidents that would turn your hair white, but I won’t. Some details of genocide are best left to be told by the peoples who suffered it.

They were people facing extermination.

I cannot help questioning Johnson’s choice to lay that label on them. Was he attempting a little discreet manipulation?

You see, in saying these people weren’t “angels”, he was stigmatising all people who stand up against murderous oppression.

Perhaps he was thinking ahead to a future when a Conservative government headed by someone like himself would be gleefully exterminating people with long-term illnesses, disabilities and care needs, and demonising anybody who tried to speak up for them with a rhetoric about “scroungers” and “skivers”.

Can’t you just imagine him commenting on the latest deaths? “Appalling. But they weren’t exactly angels, these cripples.”

Source: Boris Johnson urged to apologise for Srebrenica comments – BBC News

Uncomfortable facts that should be addressed – not just on Holocaust Memorial Day but every day

A woman and a man at the memorial plaque at Buchenwald concentration camp near Weimar, Germany [Image: Jens Schlueter/Getty Images].

Here‘s a worthwhile article on the Beastrabban blog, making an important point about the way the scope of Holocaust Memorial Day seems to have been limited.

Today is, I believe, Holocaust Remembrance Day, when the world, or at least the Western world, reflects on the Shoah and the calculated extermination of six million Jews.

As we commemorate the sufferings of the Jews during the Nazi regime, we also need to take on board that it isn’t just about anti-Semitism, but about similar horrors that have disfigured human history down the centuries, and murderous, criminal regimes that are perpetrating them today.

Just so. The Nazi Holocaust, the killing of millions of Jews, and the way in which they were murdered, should never be forgotten. But part of this remembrance must involve recognition that similar hate-motivated atrocities can happen – and are happening – even now.

Unfortunately, there are some highly vocal people who seem to want to mask this fact, as we have seen on This Site over the last few days.

Holocaust Remembrance Day isn’t just about commemorating the Holocaust and its victims, but other genocides and their victims that have occurred throughout history. Hitler partly made his decision to go ahead with the extermination of the Jews because of the complete lack of western reaction to the Young Turks’ massacre of the Armenians. He commented, ‘Who remembers the Armenians?’ And before then, the German colonial authorities in what is now Tanganyika had attempted to exterminate the Herrero after they revolted, using similar eugenicist logic.

It is … important to remember the other victims of the Nazi camps as well.

This included the congenitally disabled, who were murdered by Nazi doctors under the Aktion T4 programme with the assistance and supervision of the SS… This prefigured and prepared for the murder of the Jews, particularly in the use of poison gas.

I made the point that disabled people are being persecuted to their deaths by the Conservative government in the United Kingdom – right now – in a response to comments in Prime Minister’s Questions on Wednesday (January 24).

And what initial response did I receive?

Denial. And denial is one of the ten stages of genocide, as we all know from the Holocaust Memorial Day website. Right?

The Nazis also attempted to exterminate the Romanies – the Gypsies – as they too were considered, like the Jews, to be subhuman and a threat to German society and racial industry.

Other victims of the camps included the mentally ill, neurotics, prostitutes, recidivist criminals, Prisoners of War, and political prisoners, such as trade unionists, Socialists, Communists, Anarchists, gay men, and slave workers from the Slav nations. The last were worked to death in horrific conditions, including building the Nazi fortifications and tunnels in the Channel Islands.

The Holocaust Memorial Day website devotes a couple of paragraphs on a page to these victims of the Nazi Holocaust. The highest estimate of the death figures shows they outnumber Jewish victims by a ratio of nearly two to one.

The website also devotes several pages each to the genocides in Cambodia, Darfur, Bosnia and Rwanda, and mentions the atrocities against Armenians which encouraged Hitler to commit his own.

It omits many other genocides, both recent and historical.

Nothing is said about the indigenous people of America, for example. Those of you who are aware of the HMD website may not even know there is a site for Aztec Natives, which makes the following pertinent point:

“The Mexican people are the descendants and the end product of five centuries of genocide – the greatest Holocaust in human history. Over 100 million of our ancestors, i.e. at least 90% of natives were killed.”

100 million dead, and no commemoration on Holocaust Memorial Day. It seems some groups have stronger public relations people than others.

Genocides have continued to be perpetrated, such as the various crimes against humanity committed by Fascist regimes across Latin America, Asia and Africa, supported by American foreign policy. The persecution of the Rohingya is just the latest of these.

Isn’t it interesting how we can identify the wrongdoings of people in other countries, yet we say nothing about what’s happening in our own? “It couldn’t happen here”, as the saying goes.

It has; it does; it is.

Those who deny it are complicit.

Fortunately, the Beastrabban piece provides a ray of hope. We see that not everybody supports the overwhelming concentration of attention on the Nazi Holocaust, and it is important to note that Jewish scholars are among those leading the way in this regard.

And Jews have been involved in protesting and commemorating them and their victims as well. In Canada, the leader of the mainstream Jewish organisation, Bernie Farber, organised a ‘Shabbat for Darfur’ after that city was attacked by the Islamist Janjaweed Militia in the early part of this century. Farber’s generous action has been bitterly criticised by members of the transatlantic conservative Right, who feel that Jews should concentrate solely on their own sufferings in the Holocaust, and not expand their experience of suffering, persecution and attempted genocide to form solidarity with the other persecuted ethnic and religious groups.

Why not form solidarity with other persecuted groups? We all know there is strength in numbers. Is it because making such connections might reveal uncomfortable truths about events closer to home?

Israeli scholars have also noted that the Holocaust, while horrific, was not a unique event. See Genocide: A Critical Bibliographic Review, edited by Israel W. Charny, the executive director of the Institute on the Holocaust, Jerusalem, and Director of Postgraduate Interdisplinary and Graduate Social Work Programs in Family, Therapy, Bob Shapell School of Social Work, Tel Aviv University. Dr. Charny’s book also includes a chapter on the ethnic cleansing of Israel’s indigenous Arab population, which is definitely unwelcome to the Likudniks.

But it bears out Ilan Pappe’s assertion that Israelis are still decent people, who need to have the situation and issues properly explained to them. But odiously, Netanyahu, Likud and other ethno-nationalists in his ruling coalition are doing all they can to prevent that occurring. As are his little helpers over here in the shape of the Jewish Labour Movement and the Campaign Against Anti-Semitism.

Food for thought, I hope. But I wonder if critics of This Site and This Writer will be able to forgive me for including more groups in my own commemoration of Holocaust Memorial Day than they do.

Source: Wishing Everyone a Solemn and Reflective Holocaust Remembrance Day | Beastrabban\’s Weblog


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