Tag Archives: box

Universal Credit claimants on medication could be fined for failing to tick prescription box – that DOESN’T EXIST

I’m going to go out on a limb here and suggest that this takes government incompetence to a new depth.

Who designs prescription forms? It has to be the Department of Health – right?

All the Department for Work and Pensions had to do was advise the Department of Health that a new box should be added, so Universal Credit claimants could declare their status, and all the DoH had to do was comply.

Yet this has not happened, and innocent claimants are getting the blame.

We all know what happens if benefit claimants lose even a small amount of money – it becomes almost impossible for them to meet their day-to-day needs.

Many are driven to despair, some to suicide, and some die because of their illnesses – because their lack of money makes it impossible for them to obtain their medicine or keep it in the required condition (remember David Clapson, everyone).

Of course, this could be intentional – another turn of the screw on the sick and disabled, as part of the Conservative Party’s genocidal “chequebook euthanasia” campaign against them.

Even if it isn’t, it is endangering lives.

That’s why I’m suggesting it takes incompetence to a new disgraceful depth.

An unemployed man was left in tears and without medication because of an error with the Tory Government’s botched Universal Credit roll-out.

Universal Credit claimant Matthew Smythe went to a pharmacist to collect the free medicine that he needs for an ongoing condition and is entitled to – only to be told that he could be fined up to £100 for not ticking the Universal Credit box on his prescription – even though such a box doesn’t exist.

This is because prescription forms have not been updated in line with the controversial new benefits policy – which is causing confusion and misery for struggling people.

Source: Jobseeker left in tears and without medication because of Universal Credit error – Liverpool Echo


Vox Political needs your help!
If you want to support this site
(
but don’t want to give your money to advertisers)
you can make a one-off donation here:

Donate Button with Credit Cards

Here are four ways to be sure you’re among the first to know what’s going on.

1) Register with us by clicking on ‘Subscribe’ (in the left margin). You can then receive notifications of every new article that is posted here.

2) Follow VP on Twitter @VoxPolitical

3) Like the Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/VoxPolitical/

Join the Vox Political Facebook page.

4) You could even make Vox Political your homepage at http://voxpoliticalonline.com

And do share with your family and friends – so they don’t miss out!

If you have appreciated this article, don’t forget to share it using the buttons at the bottom of this page. Politics is about everybody – so let’s try to get everybody involved!

Buy Vox Political books so we can continue
fighting for the facts.


The Livingstone Presumption is now available
in either print or eBook format here:

HWG PrintHWG eBook

Health Warning: Government! is now available
in either print or eBook format here:

HWG PrintHWG eBook

The first collection, Strong Words and Hard Times,
is still available in either print or eBook format here:

SWAHTprint SWAHTeBook

Graph shows how Osborne’s ‘One Nation’ budget attacks the poor

150711budgetimpact

George Osborne’s claim that a boost to incomes from his National Living Wage would leave ordinary families with a higher standard of living is bunk, according to the i paper and the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

The IFS said the budget would make the poorest 10 per cent of families about £800 a year worse off by 2019, while the next-poorest 10 per cent would suffer a greater loss as their annual incomes were slashed by £1,100.

The regressive nature of Osborne’s changes is revealed by the fact that the richest 10 per cent of families will see their incomes fall by only £350 a year, while the second-richest 10 per cent will lose virtually nothing.

“Child poverty is expected to shoot up and the majority of losers from the squeeze on tax credits will be people in work,” the newspaper stated.

And IFS director Paul Johnson pointed out that the £4 billion aggregate increase in employment income from Osborne’s £9-per-hour Living Wage would not compensate for the £12 billion cut in social security. Both are to be in place by 2020.

Osborne’s budget is more like Pandora’s Box – the more we see of it, the worse the evil that comes out of it.

Follow me on Twitter: @MidWalesMike

Join the Vox Political Facebook page.

If you have enjoyed this article, don’t forget to share it using the buttons at the bottom of this page. Politics is about everybody – so let’s try to get everybody involved!

Vox Political needs your help!
If you want to support this site
(
but don’t want to give your money to advertisers)
you can make a one-off donation here:

Donate Button with Credit Cards

Buy Vox Political books so we can continue
fighting for the facts.

Health Warning: Government! is now available
in either print or eBook format here:

HWG PrintHWG eBook

The first collection, Strong Words and Hard Times,
is still available in either print or eBook format here:

SWAHTprint SWAHTeBook

How the hated bedroom tax could help us tackle the hated offshore tax-avoiders

Hugely unpopular: Thousands of people have demonstrated against the bedroom tax on the poor since it was first announced by our government of millionaires - this one was in Glasgow.

Hugely unpopular: Thousands of people have demonstrated against the bedroom tax on the poor since it was first announced by our government of millionaires – this one was in Glasgow.

Has your council or housing association re-designated any so-called “spare bedrooms” into box rooms, studies or non-specific rooms yet, to help you avoid paying the bedroom tax?

If not, you have to ask yourself, why not?

It’s only around two months since the so-called ‘state under-occupation charge’ became the law of the land, forcing social housing tenants to lose 14 per cent of their housing benefit if they have one ‘spare’ room, and a quarter of their benefit if they have two or more rooms going ‘spare’ – according to the Coalition government’s definitions, which are, of course, unjust.

Already, thousands of people are sinking into debt, according to a Daily Mirror report today (June 4).

The report states that 1,120 of New Charter Housing’s 1,600 households affected by the bedroom tax – 70 per cent – are in arrears, with tenants losing up to £88 in benefits every month.

Brighton councillors have chosen not to evict tenants who fall into arrears because of the bedroom tax, although some other councils have said this is unrealistic.

And some district judges have stated they would refuse to grant possession orders, if bedroom tax cases came to their courts, citing the Human Rights Act

The Department for Work and Pensions claims that the tax is far (it would, wouldn’t it?) and will either “encourage” or “persuade” families it claims are “over-occupying” to move out, freeing space for others on the housing waiting list, which the Tory-led Coalition has allowed to become hugely over-subscribed due to its failure to invest in building new social housing stock.

The reality is that these families have nowhere to go – for precisely the same reason (lack of social housing stock). They could move into private rented accommodation, but that is more expensive, even for smaller properties, so they would, again, face going into arrears and eventually losing their homes.

A homeless family is, of course, far more expensive for a local authority, as it must then pay to put them up in temporary accommodation – usually a bed and breakfast establishment – at much greater cost then letting them live in council or housing association homes. This is just one reason why the bedroom tax is a waste of taxpayers’ money.

But it doesn’t have to get that far.

Councils in Leeds, Nottingham and North Lanarkshire have been re-classifying spaces in their housing stock as box rooms, studies or non-specific rooms, to help tenants avoid paying the tax. Edinburgh, Birmingham and York councils have been considering the same action.

An e-petition has been launched to get Sheffield Council to re-classify bedrooms as non-specific rooms, and may be signed here.

And what’s to stop councils and housing associations from simply cutting their rents by the 14 or 25 per cent necessary to let people continuing paying the same amount? It’ll be cheaper in the long term!

Some might say that this behaviour is cheating – that it is, in essence, tax avoidance.

Tax avoidance is perfectly legal, of course – and the government has been dragging its heels about changing the law ever since it came into office back in 2010. Could this because they and their rich friends are among the worst tax avoiders, and their money is a major part of the £21 TRILLION currently sitting in offshore bank accounts, helping to ensure the economy stays stagnant and justify the government’s pointless austerity scheme?

Let’s have some uniformity: Rather than have a patchwork of re-classifications across the UK, turning the bedroom tax into a postcode lottery, let’s call on EVERY council to take this step.

When the government complains, the response should be that councils will reverse the step, after the government puts an end to all the income tax avoidance it has been allowing and collects all the money that we, as a nation, are owed.

After that, there won’t be a need for the bedroom tax and so that law can be repealed.

Postscript: There will be naysayers who’ll respond to this by saying it’ll never happen and it can never work. Their principle purpose in doing so is to discourage people from trying.

There is a response to this, as follows: Why not? IF YOU DON’T ASK, YOU DON’T GET!