Tag Archives: bully

Shaun Bailey doubles down on Carol Vorderman. Here’s more about HIM

Shaun Bailey: instead of shutting up, he has doubled down. At least it’s entertaining for the rest of us.

Some people don’t know when to shut up.

This Writer has said it before and no doubt I’ll have to say it again – especially about Tories.

The case in point is that of Shaun Bailey, the “Partygate Peer” (ennobled for failing to win the election to be London’s mayor, despite having been caught taking part in one of the infamous Tory “lockdown parties”) who attacked Carol Vorderman for having political views while (he claimed) posting revealing photos of herself on Instagram.

He’s been back on the box, doubling down on his claim and adding that he thinks her political views make Ms Vorderman a bully.

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Here’s what he said. Take note of Dr Louise Raw’s comment that prefaces the clip here, and let’s come back to it after you’ve been through all the evidence.

The appearance has attracted more adverse publicity for Bailey from Ms Vorderman’s supporters:

And here’s a nine-minute rundown of Tory misogyny, including that alleged of Bailey himself, that is well worth watching:

Did you notice the part in which Ms Vorderman’s Instagram is examined and the images had nary a bum or boob in sight?

I mention this because Bailey does also have his supporters, like Julia Hartley-Brewer, who insisted that “it’s all bum and boobs”, in the fact of the evidence.

And one of her guests still came out in support of Ms Vorderman! Watch:

Put it all together and the image of Shaun Bailey that has been presented to the public – by people on both sides of the argument – is of an unsavoury individual who is supported by people of similar unsavoury characteristics.

So, going back to Dr Louise Raw’s comment: if you are a parent of a school-age child, would you want this man visiting their school and polluting their mind?

Perhaps the last word for now should go to Florence, below, who refers to a Conservative Women event attended by both Bailey and “Rohypnol Jimmy” – the current Home Secretary, James Cleverly.

Her post refers to both Cleverly’s self-expressed (although he claimed it was humorous) interest in spiking women’s drinks with a date-rape drug and Bailey’s attitude to women’s clothing:

Rishi Sunak should be going frantic. With an election only months away, these men are the poorest advert for the Conservative Party that there could be.


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Starmer abuse audio was a deepfake, according to French news agency

Hooray: it wasn’t him, according to someone else.

Concerns about threats posed to democracy by artificial intelligence have been raised after a French news agency said audio purporting to be of Labour leader Keir Starmer shouting abuse at his staff, was fake.

The clip, which This Site posted earlier, along with another, were manipulated by AI, according to French news agency AFP.

This Writer is satisfied that the claim may be legitimate, because AFP may under no circumstances fall under the control, either de facto or de jure, of any ideological, political or economic grouping.

The audio was posted onto X (formerly Twitter) by an anonymous account with only around 3,000 followers, so we can take those details as indicators of fakeness for the future.

Next time, if it hasn’t been verified by technicians at a reputable organisation (like the afore-mentioned, impartial AFP), perhaps we’ll be wiser to ignore it.

Source: Labour faces political attack after deepfake audio is posted of Sir Keir Starmer | Politics News | Sky News


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Is this a recording of Keir Starmer bullying staffers? If so, should he become PM?

Keir Starmer: tongue lashing.

UPDATE: It seems the audio that was the basis for this article was faked. This story will remain up as a reminder of what happened – and of what to look for in other faked media.

An audio file has been released, purportedly of Keir Starmer bullying Labour Party staffers.

A check on whether the file was computer-generated gives a more-than-90-per-cent probability that the voice on the recording is human, although we cannot be entirely sure that it is Starmer’s.

Here’s the recording. Don’t listening if swearing disturbs you:

Make of it what you will.

But if this recording is genuine, do you want a person like that running the UK?


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Gavin Williamson wanted to clear his name of bullying accusation. He failed

Williamson apologises: he has failed to clear himself of bullying Wendy Morton and was ordered to make reparation to her.

Serial Tory failure Gavin Williamson has failed again – to clear his name of bullying fellow Tory Wendy Morton.

He quit as Minister Without Portfolio last year after sending expletive-laden texts to former Tory chief whip Wendy Morton, accusing her of excluding some MPs from the late Queen’s funeral last September.

Ms Morton lodged a complaint with Parliament in November and Williamson quit his government position in order to clear his name – but the inquiry found against him and he was ordered to deliver his apology in a speech in the House of Commons on Monday (September 4).

He said he accepted he had used “intemperate and inappropriate language,” and he accepted “the decision that my conduct constituted a breach” of the policy.

“I will do my utmost to ensure this does not happen again,” he added.

Opposition parties have questioned why Mr Sunak appointed Sir Gavin as a minister in October last year, after being told about Ms Morton’s complaint – and it is a good question, especially as Williamson’s apology comes at the same time as Chris Pincher’s suspension.

Pincher had to resign as a Tory whip after he admitted groping two men. It subsequently transpired that then-prime minister Boris Johnson had promoted him to the Whips’ office, despite having been informed of previous transgressions by the same MP.

Bullying is not the same as sexual offences – but the fault of the Tory leader in both cases is the same; giving a job to an MP whose integrity was, at the very least, questionable (and proved to be nonexistant).

Williamson sent the abusive texts to Ms Morton on September 13, 2022, complaining that he and other colleagues had been excluded from the Queen’s funeral for political reasons. Here are the most offending messages:

Ms Morton complained to the Conservative Party about his conduct on October 24. He refused to apologise.

Ex-Conservative Party Chair Jake Berry said he told Rishi Sunak of the complaint on the day it was made. Sunak subsequently made Williamson a Cabinet minister.

Morton handed Williamson’s messages to the Conservative Party on October 26, two days after she made her complaint – but Sunak insisted that he did not see them until they were published in The Sunday Times on November 6.

Do you believe that?

An official investigation into Williamson’s words to Ms Morton was launched on November 8 – but, by then, other allegations had been made against him.

According to the BBC,

Sir Gavin told a senior civil servant to “slit your throat” and “jump out of the window” when he was defence secretary.

An unnamed official told the Guardian Sir Gavin, who is now a Cabinet Office minister in Rishi Sunak’s government, “deliberately demeaned and intimidated” them.

The official said they raised concerns to the Ministry of Defence’s human resources department but made no formal complaint.

Williamson did not deny using the language mentioned in the accusation.

But he issued a statement: “I strongly reject this allegation and have enjoyed good working relationships with the many brilliant officials I have worked with across government.

“No specific allegations have ever been brought to my attention.”

Williamson resigned in order to fight Ms Morton’s claims against him on November 8. He also said he did not want to become a distraction from the work of Sunak’s government.

It was the third time the serial quitter had resigned a government role.

Williamson’s previous Cabinet role ended when he was sacked as Education Secretary in September 2021.

At the time, I wrote the following:

England’s education system is (momentarily) stronger with the announcement that Gavin Williamson has been sacked from his post as the minister in charge, as part of a Cabinet reshuffle by Boris Johnson.

His two-year tenure stands as testament to the fact that having no Education Secretary is better than having him in the role.

Incompetent Williamson’s failures are fast becoming the stuff of legend, with the headline disasters well-known to all of us:

In 2020, when A-level students could not take their exams because of Covid-19, he used a algorithm to allocate marks – that was rigged to make it seem that privately-educated pupils were more intelligent than the riff-raff from the state system that he ran.

He later tried to force disadvantaged, black and minority ethnic children in England to take exams when other kids didn’t have to, claiming that they respond better to examination conditions. It seemed clear racism – an attempt to put these children down with duff results.

He made it clear that the government expected all schools to open as normal in January this year – then closed them after just one day because prime minister Boris Johnson ordered a new lockdown and he was unaware of it.

He decided to foist Latin as a subject onto state school pupils, rather than anything useful. At the time I wrote: “Having killed the economy with Brexit and enormous numbers of the population with Covid-19, the Tories now want us all to learn a dead language.”

He scrapped dozens of legal rights for children.

He also wanted a clampdown on indiscipline in schools after the return from Covid-19 lockdown – but provided no evidence whatsoever to support his wild claim that our children had gone feral.

Before Boris Johnson gave him the bullet, it was suggested that Williamson would blame school pupils and parents if Covid-19 infections spike after the start of the school term.

Prior to that, he was Defence Secretary under Theresa May – but was sacked from that job too.

In May 2019, I wrote:

Theresa May has sacked Gavin Williamson as Defence Secretary, saying she has “lost confidence in his ability to serve in the role of defence secretary and as a member of her cabinet”.

It appears he is to take responsibility for an embarrassing leak from the National Security Council, stating that Huawei is to take a contract to help provide the UK’s 5G network, despite concerns over spyware funnelling information to the Chinese government.

But was he really to blame?

Mr Williamson himself is on the record as swearing on his children’s life that he had nothing to do with the leak.

But it seems an inquiry run by Cabinet Secretary Mark Sedwill has found that he was responsible for the leak, which has angered the United States government, which has banned Huawei from government networks and pressurised the UK to do the same.

Alternatively, some have suggested that the US is simply protecting its interests, saying Huawei provides better service than American firms.

According to The Independent, Mr Williamson is said to believe his firing was “politically motivated”.

It has also been alleged that Williamson was knighted on the wishes of Boris Johnson because he knew of connections between Johnson and Russia that the former prime minister wanted to keep quiet.

So there are certainly a lot of claims about Williamson. Did he ever clear up those previous allegations? Not as far as This Writer is aware.

Has he cleared up the other allegations of bullying? Not as far as This Writer is aware.

It is possible that some – especially among the Conservative Party – will want to close the book on Gavin Williamson’s alleged wrongdoing now.

I would suggest that it would be premature to do so. Let’s have all the answers first.

Amid frantic denials, is Steve Barclay the Tories’ next bullying scandal? 

Steve Barclay: another Tory bully?

Is he a bully or isn’t he?

The Guardian reckons the Department of Health’s top civil servant has received multiple complaints about Health Secretary Steve Barclay; the DoH itself says he hasn’t.

So your answer, for the moment, depends on who you trust.

It’s certainly true that the Tory government won’t want to deal with another bullying scandal so soon after Dominic Raab, and will want to discourage civil servants from acting on the precedent created by the former Deputy Prime Minister’s case.

According to the Graun,

senior civil servants in the department had privately referred to “bullying” and other “bad behaviour” by Barclay towards his staff since he joined the Whitehall department in July last year.

One source said there were “a lot of unhappy people at the Department of Health just now”, in part as a result of Barclay’s behaviour. Another said officials in his private office had “borne the brunt” of his behaviour. “Everyone finds him quite challenging,” said a third source.

Two other Whitehall sources alleged that he had regularly “blasted” staff in full view of others in the office. One of these insiders said he was “constantly angry”, which was “very difficult” for officials, who now “don’t want to have meetings with him”. Another source claimed that there were occasions were he “deliberately ignored” staff who tried to talk to him.

A separate source added: “Barclay’s style is very macho … He would say that he’s forensic. But in reality he’s a micro-manager. He hauls people over the coals and is generally a bit unpleasant.”

The BBC – ever the Tory mouthpiece – has run a story based around the government’s denials.

It states,

The Department of Health has not received any formal complaints about the behaviour of Health Secretary Steve Barclay, a spokesman has said.

Someone who has worked with him told the BBC the claims were “totally unsubstantiated and a politically motivated attack”.

Another government official said many colleagues “speak highly” of Mr Barclay and are unhappy about the briefings.

Foreign Secretary James Cleverly told Sky News that his colleague Mr Barclay was “absolutely not” a bully.

(This on its own is probably enough to convince anyone that he is; Cleverly’s relationship with the facts has been put in doubt before, remember.)

Both The Guardian and the BBC reported that the Department of Health had said no official complaints had been received.

But that’s not what the claims in The Guardian had said. It stated that civil servants had informally complained to Chris Wormald, the department’s permanent secretary, about the way they believe they and colleagues have been treated by the Health Secretary.

And it added that the DoH

did not deny being alerted to concerns informally in the way sources described.

This could be a very clever trap set by Guardian journalists for the Tory government.

With the official denials out in the open, civil servants may be encouraged to lodge official complaints, simply from anger at having their privately-raised concerns denied.

So, by refusing to admit the existence of any complaints at all – official or unofficial, the government may have put Steve Barclay on a path to the political dustbin.

Source: Health department officials ‘raised concerns’ about Steve Barclay’s behaviour | Steve Barclay | The Guardian


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Something for the weekend: let’s laugh at Dominic Raab

Dominic Raab: he was trying to justify himself to the Commons Foreign Affairs committee in this shot; he’s been trying to justify himself for years.

He’s gone; good riddance.

For clarity, let’s have a reminder of some of the events leading up to Dominic Raab’s departure from politics:

Some of us have been making fun of him since the allegations were first made:

But the best take-down This Writer has seen – so far – was by James O’Brien on LBC:


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Raab’s resignation over bullying is a sign of Sunak’s weakness

Happier times for them: Dominic Raab and Rishi Sunak.

Dominic Raab has resigned as Justice Secretary and Deputy Prime Minister, after making Rishi Sunak wait a day for him to do it.

He went with the ill grace that has characterised his ministerial career – blaming anybody else he could find.

An inquiry by Adam Tolley KC investigated eight allegations of bullying against Raab, and found him guilty of two.

He handed his report to prime minister Rishi Sunak on Thursday morning (April 21),

It seems Sunak then sat on it for 24 hours, waiting for Raab to do the right thing and resign.

Downing Street says no pressure was applied to Raab and there is no indication that Sunak ever considered sacking him. Resigning means Raab gets to keep his Ministerial pension, and this means that – in practice – any Tory Cabinet Minister found to have committed misdeeds is given the opportunity to resign. Remember how Priti Patel left Theresa May’s Cabinet?

According to the BBC, the report states that:

on a number of occasions, while meeting with policy officials, Raab “acted in a manner which was intimidating, in the sense of going further than was necessary or appropriate in delivering critical feedback, and also insulting, in the sense of making unconstructive critical comments about the quality of work done (whether or not as a matter of substance any criticism was justified).”

It concludes that while implementing a certain decision in the role “he acted in a way which was intimidating, in the sense of unreasonably and persistently aggressive conduct in the context of a work meeting.

“His conduct also involved an abuse or misuse of power in a way that undermines or humiliates. He introduced an unwarranted punitive element.”

It looks at his behaviour in meetings with officials as justice secretary, and picks out an example where Raab complained about the absence of “basic information” from officials, about staff “whom he perceived to be resistant to his policies, and described some work as “utterly useless” and “woeful”.

Raab’s “interruptive style” is not in itself intimidating, the report says, but the combination of this with “unconstructive critical feedback is likely to have been experienced as intimidating, in the sense of being unreasonably difficult to deal with”.

It seems Raab had said he would resign if there was any finding of bullying at all and Sunak had simply waited for him to honour his word. Caught between a rock and a hard place – the findings of the report were always going to be publicised and his comments were already public knowledge – it was just a matter of time before Raab went.

But he didn’t go quietly.

Instead, he complained that Mr Tolley had set his standard for bullying at a very low level, meaning his inquiry had “set a dangerous precedent”.

Was this true, though? It seems to me that, if six allegations had been dismissed, then there must at least have been some reasonable basis for the level at which Mr Tolley decided bullying had taken place.

In his resignation letter, Raab made it clear that he did not agree with the findings against him. He said ministers “must be able to give direct critical feedback on briefings and submissions to senior officials, in order to set the standards and drive the reform the public expect of us.

“In setting the threshold for bullying so low, this inquiry has set a dangerous precedent.

“It will encourage spurious complaints against ministers, and have a chilling effect on those driving change on behalf of your government – and ultimately the British people.”

In another part of the letter he said he was “genuinely sorry for any unintended stress or offence that any officials felt, as a result of the pace, standards and challenge that I brought to the Ministry of Justice”.

This has been described as a “non-apology” by a person who “advised him at a senior level in a government department”. This person said: “Whilst the letter contains an apology, it’s one of the best examples of a ‘non-apology’ from a minister in recent years. It’s relatively easy to set pace, standards and challenge, it’s much harder to lead effectively to deliver against these objectives.”

This person continued: “Raab’s version of a Secretary of State and Deputy Prime Minister is one that should be learnt from and ultimately consigned to the history books. The level of relief from hard-working civil servants who can now, under new leadership, get on with the challenging and important jobs they signed up to do, is palpable.”

That claim has been borne out by responses to the BBC by civil servants. One said: “I feel relief – just huge relief.”

Another added: “It’s perhaps of note from his letter that he feels there are different, perhaps acceptable thresholds of bullying, which perhaps says all it needs to say about this whole fiasco.”

Sunak himself has stated that there were “shortcomings in the historic process” by which the inquiry was carried out, that have “negatively affected everyone involved”, and “we should learn from this how to better handle such matters in future”.

This is another indication of the prime minister’s personal weakness.

One of his ministers has been found to be a bully, but he’s not about to bring in measures to ensure that nobody else does the same.

Instead, it seems he wants to water down the process to ensure that it can’t make a similar finding against any of his other ministers, even if they deserve it.


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New claim that Dominic Raab is ‘100% a bully’ as inquiry fails to report back

Dominic Raab: I don’t know… does he look to you like the kind of man who could be a bully?

Another civil servant has said Dominic Raab is – not just a bully, but “100 per cent a bully” as an independent inquiry faces condemnation for failing to report back.

This is just an update for us all to enjoy as the screw turns a little tighter on a Deputy Prime Minister who might not have a job for much longer.

Enjoy:

Dominic Raab is “100% a bully”, and also took no steps to intervene in bullying by others, a former Foreign Office official has said in the latest accusations against the justice secretary and former foreign secretary.

The claims, reported by ITV News, came as Rishi Sunak declined to say why an independent inquiry into Raab’s behaviour had not yet reported back after more than four months, or if he would sack Raab if it uncovered misconduct.

The justice secretary, who vehemently denies that he has bullied or intimidated staff, oversaw a toxic atmosphere when in charge of the Foreign Office, the anonymous ex-staffer said, with his office viewed as “a hardship post”.

The official said that in deciding whether or not they believed Raab was a bully, he had looked up the dictionary definition. “I read it as someone that uses their influence to intimidate other people,” he said. “And if that is the definition then he was 100% a bully.”

Officials were “terrified to have interactions with him but also to interact with his office”, he said, adding that he had also witnessed Raab do “absolutely nothing” when a colleague was being bullied by someone else.

“He didn’t step in,” the official said. “One of the most powerful men in the country was condoning it and saying that kind of behaviour was acceptable.”

The joy of this is that, no matter what this “independent” (is it?) inquiry says, interviewers will be able to torture Raab for the rest of his career or life with the fact that the people who worked for him thought he was a really nasty piece of… work.

The sooner the end-of-career retrospectives start coming out, the better.

Source: Dominic Raab is ‘100% a bully’, says former Foreign Office official | Dominic Raab | The Guardian


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Was Rishi Sunak’s reshuffle just a bid to distract attention from Dominic Raab?

Dominic Raab: he reckons he has never raised his voice in a meeting, and denies all other bullying accusations against him. Do you believe him?

Rishi Sunak has performed a snap reshuffle of his Cabinet, splitting some departments to reflect his priorities (he says).

Good for him. But I have to question some of his decisions and motives.

Look at his new Department for Energy Security and Net Zero (which isn’t even a clear explanation of what it is. Net Zero refers to the plan to get the UK down to no carbon dioxide emissions, but that’s not what it says).

The stated aim is “securing our long-term energy supply, bringing down bills and halving inflation” – but we know that absolutely no work will be required on the last aim because inflation will halve this year in any case. This is just a bid to take credit where it isn’t due.

Then there’s the appointment of nonentity Greg Hands as Tory Party Chairman, tasked with running the local election campaign (among other things). Is this a tacit admission that the Tories have no chance?

And what about the decision to make “30p Lee” Anderson vice-chairman? The apparent homophobe and transphobe who reckoned it was possible to cook a meal for 30p. This is barrel-scraping at its worst.

Check out this analysis from A Different Bias for more insight:

Dominic Raab stays in place as Justice Secretary and Deputy PM.

And Sunak made this decision on the day it was revealed that yet another bullying accusation has been made against Raab.

According to the BBC,

A former senior civil servant who worked closely with Dominic Raab has described his behaviour as “nasty and difficult”.

In an anonymous interview with BBC Newsnight, he accuses the deputy prime minister and justice secretary of using “demeaning tactics to make himself the most powerful person in the room”.

The former civil servant – who has not made a formal complaint against Mr Raab – told the BBC, “I saw him seething at other senior people, hard staring at you, you know like cold fury.

“It was pretty sinister – and raising his voice. He would make examples of very senior members of staff in front of more junior members and vice versa.”

When challenged on whether this was bullying or just a secretary of state being direct and assertive while doing an important job, the person said they had no doubt it was “unacceptable behaviour”.

“No, it’s bullying. I mean, the worst thing is the sort of the cold anger and making people wait in silence.

“Expecting people to turn up very, very quickly without knowing really why they’re there. Treating his private office with contempt and doing so publicly.

“There were long silences, which if you tried to continue speaking he would tell you to wait or stop talking.

“And he would expect everyone to have the answers to all his questions even when he wanted information on topics outside of the knowledge of the people in the room. He would get cross with his private office on these occasions for not ensuring all the right people were in the room”, he said.

Who’s got time for that kind of nonsense?

If anyone told me to sit in a meeting in silence I’d assert that, since nobody had anything to say, I’d get back to my job – and leave.

But that’s just me, I suppose.

The decision to leave Raab in post betrays a serious failure of judgement on Sunak’s part. It suggests that, if Raab is forced out eventually, Sunak may have to go too.


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Five new accusations have been made against Dominic Raab

Dominic Raab: he remains Justice Secretary, despite the fact that the number of accusations against him has almost tripled.

Still he remains in post, though.

With five new accusations, the number of complaints against Dominic Raab – the Justice Secretary, has risen to eight.

He denies allegations of bullying and says he has behaved professionally throughout his time as a government minister.

The three complaints already under investigation related to his time as foreign secretary and Brexit secretary, as well as at the Ministry of Justice.

The prime minister’s official spokesman said the [five new] claims related to Mr Raab’s previous tenure as justice secretary.

Labour’s Keir Starmer has called for Raab’s status as a minister (and a Conservative MP?) to be suspended. That is, after all, what would happen to a Labour Party member.

Senior lawyer Adam Tolley KC is investigating all eight complaints against Raab. He will report to Rishi Sunak, who will make the final decision on whether Raab’s conduct breached the ministerial code and should be sacked.

But we know that Tory prime ministers may abuse this duty. Boris Johnson cleared Priti Patel, despite abundant evidence against her.

And Starmer has already said it was “a consequence of having a weak prime minister” that Raab continues to serve in government while complaints about his behaviour are investigated.

Let us hope that we are told all the information we need to make up our own minds, once judgement is passed.

Have YOU donated to my crowdfunding appeal, raising funds to fight false libel claims by TV celebrities who should know better? These court cases cost a lot of money so every penny will help ensure that wealth doesn’t beat justice.

https://www.crowdjustice.com/case/mike-sivier-libel-fight/


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