Tag Archives: crap

‘Crap parenting’: Rishi Sunak doesn’t get that his government is the problem

‘Crap government’: James Daly (left) and Rishi Sunak.

UK prime minister Rishi Sunak has stuck his oar into the debate on ‘crap parenting’ that Tory MP James Daly foolishly started last week.

Daly sparked an outcry when he said “crap parenting” was the cause of many young people’s problems in life.

Members of the public were quick to point out that government decisions have played a huge part, with the axing of Sure Start, abolition of youth clubs, reduction of resources for child and adolescent mental health teams, austerity coupled with rising food costs and exorbitant rents, budget deficits for special educational needs and children with disabilities, the crisis in teacher retention and decimation of learning support staff, a level of impoverishment that food banks cannot alleviate, and dwindling nursery and pre-school provision.

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The sharp rise in adolescent knife crime has been linked with massive cuts to youth services.

Asked about Daly’s comments, Sunak went off on a tangent about poverty. He said:

“All the evidence and the research shows that the best way to ensure that children don’t grow up in poverty is to make sure that they are not growing up in a household where no-one is working.”

“No one wants to see any child grow up in poverty. I certainly don’t.

“The best way we can help families is to make sure that those parents are in great jobs and are well-paid and that we are cutting their taxes.”

No individual family can use wealth to rid itself of problems that are caused by failings in society.

This Writer personally knows plenty of young people from rich families who are dysfunctional at best.

And Sunak’s government has cut wages, year on year, since it slithered into Downing Street in 2010. Junior doctors are the current classic example, with a whopping 35 per cent pay rise needed simply to bring them back up to parity with their 2010 level.

So in 2019/20, 18.8 per cent of children and working-age adults in poverty lived in families where all adults were working and at least one was working full-time. This rose to a whopping 65.9 per cent in families where at least one adult was working part-time or more.

Furthermore, if taxes are cut, Sunak will say there is no money to restore the vital services listed above, that young people have lost.

He’ll be the first to bemoan adolescent knife crime if it hits the headlines again – and the last to admit his government caused it by cutting youth services.

Source: No one should grow up poor, Sunak says after Tory MP’s ‘crap parenting’ remark


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James Daly: Crap government is the problem facing young people, not crap parents

‘New Conservative’ James Daly: his ‘crap government’ is to blame for young people’s problems more than ‘crap parents’, it seems.

Remember when Tory MP James Daly told us all that young people face a lot more problems these days because they have “crap parents”?

This Site published an article about it here, raising concerns that he was just trying to avoid any responsibility that might lie with the government.

Now, I see parents and others have written to The Guardian, making the same point more forcefully. Here’s one:

His [Daly’s] Conservative government got rid of the excellent Sure Start scheme introduced by Labour to help parents understand how to relate to their young children when they perhaps had no good model of parenting themselves.

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His Conservative government abolished so many youth clubs, which could provide a sanctuary for teenagers to play sports or discuss their problems with a counsellor rather than resorting to gang violence on the streets, which may well have contributed to some of these problems.

His Conservative government could have provided more resources for child and adolescent mental health service teams to help children with emotional difficulties, as well as giving their parents support, which would have lessened the number of children having to wait months for the urgent treatment they need.

Being a parent is hard, especially for those who have suffered most throughout these years of austerity and decline in public services, and who have been living with the added anxiety of rising costs of food and clothing and the exorbitant rise in rents, which has resulted in so many families now living in temporary accommodation.

This, of course, adds to a child’s sense of insecurity. If the government were more in touch with the effect of these issues, it could have seen how much families have been affected and addressed these problems rather than, as Daly does, condemning “crap parents” for children’s struggles.

Another writes:

Attributing “kids who struggle” to “crap parents” is as hypocritical as it is contemptible. Are these the parents of children who struggle because of budget deficits for special educational needs and disabilities? Are they parents of children in schools denied a full complement of staff because of the crisis in teacher retention and the decimation of learning support staff?

Is the clamour for extending free school meals evidence of feckless parents, or of a level of impoverishment that food banks cannot keep pace with? Is disquiet at dwindling, inaccessible nursery and pre-school provision just the ungrateful voice of the low‑paid, despite them facing the second‑highest childcare costs in the developed world?

Obsessed with parents, Daly dismisses all other considerations. He cannot allow, for example, the connection that professionals and campaigners, including an all-party parliamentary group, have long made between a sharp rise in adolescent knife crime and massive cuts to youth services.

Neither has he time for those advocating strategies to improve social cohesion or identifying causes of its erosion (Youth violence isn’t an incurable disease – my work with young people proves it, 10 October).

Instead, Daly lauds “stability” as a defining characteristic of the family, while supporting a government that has weakened the structures on which the most vulnerable depend for that stability. He may have reason to reflect on the quality of parenting that produced his warped sense of propriety.

Last word goes to the person who wrote the following, which is excellent:

“How many “crap parents” showed their misjudgement in voting for James Daly?”

He may have a point.

Source: Crap government is the problem, not crap parents


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Prepare to sift the substance from the sewage in the Chance(llo)r’s Autumn Statement

131203autumnstatement

[Picture: Vox Political reader Al Reading]

How long has it been since Labour was deemed the party with no policies and no direction? Now it seems the Conservatives have taken up this undesirable label and applied it to themselves (excuse the choice of words) liberally.

Labour’s stand on energy prices sent the Tories scurrying away to find an answer, after they finally realised that baldly claiming nothing could be done was not going to cut any ice.

When they finally came up with something, their answer was to “Cut the green crap” and reduce the environmental levy on energy firms – a u-turn within a u-turn for the party that once proclaimed to the nation, “Vote Blue – Go Green”.

This week they have also u-turned on cigarette packaging – for a second time within a matter of months. Before the summer, the Conservative vision was to safeguard children from smoking by removing packaging for cigarette packets. Then – after coincidentally hiring fag-company lobbyist Lynton Crosby to run their campaigns for them – they decided that the packaging could stay. Now – in the face of a possibly Lords rebellion – they are reversing their position yet again.

This is the context in which Boy Chancellor George Osborne will make his Autumn Statement – and he has already put himself on a sticky wicket before going in to bat.

Remember David Cameron’s massive error of judgement at the Lord Mayor’s banquet a few weeks ago, when he stood behind a gold-plated lectern that could easily be sold off or melted down to help pay of the interest on his government’s ever-increasing borrowing burden, and said austerity was here to stay?

It seems Gideon was eager to follow in his master’s footsteps, stumping up £10.2 MILLION (including VAT at the 20 per cent level that he imposed on us all in 2010) on new furnishings for his Whitehall HQ, from exclusive designers Panik, Ferrious and Senator. One Treasury insider, according to the Daily Mirror, wondered “why we couldn’t have just bought new furniture from Ikea”.

Good question! It is also one that is especially pertinent after it was revealed that Osborne has been calling for last-minute spending cuts from the Home Office and the departments of Justice, Defence, Business and Work and Pensions (yet again), because he will not be able to fund the £2 billion of giveaways announced during the conference season without them.

These include scrapping a rise in petrol duty of almost 2p per litre, free school meals for pupils aged five-to-seven and rewarding marriage in the tax system.

It seems clear that these measures were all unfunded when they were announced, putting the lie to Conservative claims that they have any kind of plan – and ruining their claim that Osborne’s schoolboy-economist austerity idiocy has done anything to improve the UK economy.

Like him or loathe him, Will Hutton in The Guardian had it right when he wrote: “The recovery is the result of the upward swing of the economic cycle finally asserting itself, aided by policies informed by the opposite of what Osborne purports to believe.”

Hutton went on to state that Osborne decided to “borrow from the Keynesian economic locker… never admitting the scale of the philosophic shift, and then claimed victory”. In other words, Osborne is the biggest hypocrite in Westminster (and that’s a huge achievement, considering the state of them all)!

Result: “The public is misinformed – told that austerity worked and, as importantly, the philosophy behind it works too… Thus the Conservative party can be protected from the awful truth that Thatcherism fails.”

Labour MP Michael Meacher is much more scathing (if such a thing is possible). In a Parliamentary debate, quoted in his blog, he told us: “We do have a recovery of sorts, but one that has been generated in exactly the wrong way. It has been generated by consumer borrowing and an incipient bubble, and it is not — I repeat, not — a real, sustainable recovery.”

In other words, the – as Hutton describes it – “eclectic and spatchcocked Keynesianism” employed by Osborne, while superficially useful in the short-term, will cause immense damage over a longer period because he doesn’t understand it and only used it in desperation.

Both Hutton and Meacher agree that a sustainable recovery can only come from what Meacher describes as “rising investment, increasing productivity, growing wages and healthy exports”, none of which are supported by Osborne’s current behaviour.

And yet, according to the Daily Telegraph, Osborne will fulfil another of this blog’s long-standing prophecies on Thursday by telling us all that “Britain can no longer afford the welfare state”.

From a member of the most profligate snout-in-trough overspenders ever to worm their way into public office and then inflict a harm-the-defenceless agenda on the nation, that will be the biggest lie of all.

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