Tag Archives: fridge

Trump hides in a bunker while US descends into chaos over George Floyd killing

Donald Trump and Boris Johnson: one hides in a bunker, the other once hid in a fridge [Composite: Laura Tisdale/Twitter].

What did Donald Trump think would happen after police killed an unarmed black man? And does anybody else find it ironic that a man who tried to buy a golf course in Scotland has ended up hiding in a bunker?

The United States appear to have dissolved into chaos after an unarmed black man, George Floyd, was arrested on a charge of passing a forged $20 note.

Three police officers pinned him down on the ground next to their car, with one of them resting a knee on the right side of his neck for nearly nine minutes. Apparently this cut off Mr Floyd’s supply of oxygen and, coupled with existing health conditions, caused his death. The officer concerned – Derek Chauvin – apparently kept up the pressure for nearly three minutes after Mr Floyd became unresponsive.

An initial autopsy stated that the death was caused by the combined effects of being restrained, underlying health conditions, including coronary artery disease and hypertensive heart disease, and potential intoxicants in his system, but the family has requested an independent examination – which seems wise in the light of video evidence in which Mr Floyd can be heard saying, “I can’t breathe,” and “Don’t kill me.”

All four officers were fired from Minnesota police the next day, and on May 29, Chauvin was arrested and charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter for Floyd’s death, with Hennepin County attorney Michael O. Freeman saying he anticipated charges to be brought against the other three officers at the scene of Floyd’s death.

The incident sparked outrage, not just in Minnesota but across the United States – and internationally. Initially these were peaceful, but they soon degenerated into violent confrontations with police.

One such demonstration has been taking place outside the White House in Washington DC, and President Donald Trump – who has chosen not to broadcast to the nation on the subject but has confined his comments to messages on Twitter (which some have considered inflammatory) – was evacuated to a “special secure bunker”:

As protesters converged on the White House on Friday, the New York Times reports, “Secret Service agents abruptly rushed the president to the underground bunker used in the past during terrorist attacks.”

Trump has been widely criticized for his response to the protests that have rocked the nation since video of Floyd’s death began spreading on social media.

Despite days of peaceful protests and violent clashes with police in some of America’s major cities, Trump has not addressed the nation and has repeatedly sent inflammatory messages over Twitter.

“If they had [breached the fence],” the president continued, “they would have been greeted with the most vicious dogs, and most ominous weapons, I have ever seen. That’s when people would have been really badly hurt, at least.”

The decision to relocate to a bunker has drawn unkind comparisons with a certain other national leader who ended up there:

(The reference to anti-fascists being “the enemy” is about a tweet by Mr Trump in which he said “Antifa” would be designated as a terrorist organisation. The problem is that “Antifa” – a reference to anti-fascist beliefs – is an ideology, rather than an individual organisation. And, as This Writer pointed out:

(From the – expected – lack of response, it seems he hasn’t.)

The irresponsibility of the President’s behaviour has been noted – and compared with that of another national leader who we, in the UK, know very well:

Possibly the worst part of this already-shameful episode is what may be termed “collateral damage” – for example, the Guardian photographer who was shot in the eye and must live in partial blindness for the rest of her life after being deliberately targeted by US security forces.

What was she photographing, that they didn’t want the world to see?

Have YOU donated to my crowdfunding appeal, raising funds to fight false libel claims by TV celebrities who should know better? These court cases cost a lot of money so every penny will help ensure that wealth doesn’t beat justice.

https://www.crowdjustice.com/case/mike-sivier-libel-fight/


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Coalition policy success: 80,000 children homeless for Christmas

shame

Tory politicians don’t care and Liberal Democrats don’t have any power – that’s why 80,000 children are being housed in temporary accommodation, alongside drug users and enduring threats of violence, as reported by Shelter today.

The government’s own figures show 2,090 families living in bed and breakfasts – an increase of eight per cent on 2012 and the largest number in 10 years, according to The Guardian. Of these, 760 have been living in B&Bs longer than the legal six-week limit – a 10 per cent increase on last year.

More than 43,000 other homeless households with children are in other emergency accommodation – usually privately-rented short-term flats, which are expensive. This is an increase of nine per cent on last year.

To put this into context, a Labour government commitment to halve the number of families in this kind of emergency accommodation meant the total fell between 2005 and 2010 – but it has been rising again since June 2011.

This is a human disaster created by the Coalition government.

Most families interviewed by the charity said they felt unsafe, with one child directly threatened by a man after an argument over a shared bathroom. Almost half said their children had witnessed incidents such as sexual offences, drug use and dealing.

One mother of three said: “One of the reasons we left was one of the residents trying to sell us crack cocaine.”

Most of the 25 families Shelter interviewed lived in one room; half said the children were sharing beds with parents or siblings and the family was sharing kitchen facilities with others. All but three said it was hard to find a safe place for their children to play. Three families had no cooking facilities and one reported sharing a cooker and fridge with 22 other people.

More than half had to share a bathroom or toilet with strangers, with 10 families sharing with seven or more other people; two-thirds had no table to eat on, and schoolchildren were finding it hard to do homework.

And their health is suffering: “It’s so hard to give him a balanced diet as it’s impossible to make proper meals here, let alone a Christmas dinner. He’s getting really pale and is so tired all the time. He gets so scared but it’s difficult when I’m scared myself. This is no place for a child to live,” said a mother in a Hounslow B&B.

“This shouldn’t be happening in 21st century Britain,” said Shelter’s chief executive, Campbell Robb, who described the charity’s findings as “shocking” and the conditions forced on families as “shameful”.

He said: “No child should be homeless, let alone 80,000. But tragically, with more people struggling to make ends meet and homelessness on the rise, we’re bracing ourselves for an increase in demand from families who desperately need our help.”

Housing minister Kris Hopkins couldn’t care less. “We’ve given councils nearly £1bn to tackle homelessness and to support people affected by the welfare reforms,” he sniffed.

“I am very clear that they should be fully able to meet their legal responsibility to house families in suitable accommodation.”

Let us be very clear on this: the problem is not that Tories like Hopkins don’t understand. This is exactly the result that they wanted; they just won’t acknowledge it because it is electorally damaging.

Look at the policies that created this problem: The bedroom tax; the ‘Pickles Poll Tax’, otherwise known as the Council Tax reduction scheme; the benefit cap that so many people in this country seem to support without understanding any of its implications.

Vox Political reported back in January what they would mean: “There will be a rise in rent and mortgage arrears… affordable housing will be less available and landlords less able or willing to rent to tenants on benefits… Private sector rental may become less attractive to landlords if tenants aren’t paying the rent. This will lead to a growth in homelessness. Councils have statutory duties and may see an increasing burden.”

But increases to the Discretionary Housing Payment fund have been entirely insignificant compared with the extra burden councils have faced. They received £150 million between them; Durham County Council had £883,000 and spent it all within eight weeks.

We have seen the start of the social cleansing predicted by this blog back in August 2012, when we noted that at least one council would use these measures to “clear out the poor and set up shop as a desirable residence for the rich”.

The housing bubble created by George Osborne with his ‘Help To Buy’ scheme will accelerate this process.

So don’t let a Tory tell you it’s nothing to do with them. They wanted this. In fact, 80,000 homeless children at Christmas is probably not enough for them.