Tag Archives: Infosys

How much money IS Rishi Sunak giving his wife’s company?

Partners in (the) climb: Akshata Murty and her husband, UK prime minister Rishi Sunak.

Infosys, the firm run by Rishi Sunak’s father-in-law, in which his wife Akshata Murty is a major shareholder, is raking in massive profits from the UK government. Coincidence?

According to LBC,

Akshata Murty’s company received £7 million in public sector invoices last year up from £4.7 million in 2022.

The £7.029 million total in public sector invoices includes over £250,000 from the Government Property Agency (GPA), as well as a similar amount from the Care Quality Commission (£270,000) – whilst the London Borough of Brent totalled over £2 million in invoices with Infosys.

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Within these invoices, Infosys were given contracts for “Information Communication Technology” (£1.5 million), “Consultant fees” (£1.1 million) as well as “IT Consultancy” (£868,000) across various levels of government.

Public sector invoices show the actual amount spent with a company over a certain period of time.

LBC can also reveal that in addition to these regular contract wins, the company has also won spots on a number of frameworks in recent years.

Whilst this offers no guarantee of work, it can “give the company an edge in winning contracts in the future” according to Tussell.

Labour’s Jonathan Ashworth has said the public should be told exactly why Infosys, with its close links to Sunak, seems to be cashing in.

It will be interesting to see what excuse Sunak devises, if he’s pressed on this issue, which again raises the question of corruption in the government to which he claims he has brought “honesty”.

Source: Rishi Sunak’s wife’s firm Infosys received 50% boost in public sector invoices in 2023 – LBC


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Is this why the media have been so quiet about #Fujitsu’s involvement in the #PostOfficeScandal?

Fujitsu, the company that built and sold the faulty Horizon software to Post Office Limited and thereby set up hundreds of sub-postmasters to have their lives ruined, seems to have got off surprisingly lightly since ITV’s drama about the scandal.

Few commentators, apart from those of us in the social media, seem keen for the company to foot the bill for its failure to deliver adequate software that met the requirements defined by Post Office Limited.

Maybe it did meet those requirements and we’re being hoodwinked. That’s a possibility This Writer would like to see explored – it can’t be that difficult for either company to produce the requisite documentation, can it?

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For the moment, let’s consider other possible reasons Fujitsu may be kept out of the spotlight.

Principle among these must be the firm’s working relationship with Infosys, the corporation owned by Rishi Sunak’s father-in-law, in which his wife has shares.

Is it really a coincidence that the following has happened?

In the December 2019 ruling, the High Court of Justice Queen’s Bench Division Rolls Building ruled in the case of Bates and Ors vs Post Office Limited that the original Horizon system used by the Post Office had not been sufficiently robust and had suffered from a number of bugs and errors.

Some of us might have considered that to be a red flag, suggesting that Fujitsu should not be given any more high-cost government contracts.

But if you think about the top two sentences in the next post, you can probably think of a reason for what’s described in the third:

Finally, and very important to all of the above:

Draw your own conclusions from the information you see above.


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Starmer calls for Gaza ceasefire – but he’s still toeing the Tory line

Camouflage Keir: apparently there was a reason he was wearing this – but, honestly, who cares?

Keir Starmer has finally given up on Israel doing the right thing and has called for a ceasefire in Gaza.

He did it while wearing full camouflage kit. This Writer would like to take this opportunity to assure you that even Starmer isn’t crazy enough to offer to enforce such a ceasefire himself. At least, I don’t think so.

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Here he is, making his demand:

But!

Starmer’s call came after Tory prime minister Rishi Sunak made his own demand for a ceasefire – and there’s a bit of speculation about why he did it:

It is a very strong argument, considering the record of the UK’s prime miniature – a ventriloquist’s dummy in a monkey suit, mouthing the demands of big business and trying to walk like a man.

“No regard for human life.” That seems right to me.


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Rishi Sunak is causing yet another conflict-of-interest – CORRUPTION – row

Akshata Murty and her husband, UK prime minister Rishi Sunak: it seems that, days after being forced to apologise for failing to declare that she (and therefore he) will benefit from one policy of the government he leads, he is trying to ensure that they will – corruptly? – benefit from another.

The UK prime minister who came into office promising “integrity, professionalism and accountability” is embroiled in yet another corruption/conflict-of-interest row involving his wife’s father’s multinational corporation, Infosys.

Rishi Sunak is trying to negotiate a free trade deal with India, where Infosys is based, and the allegation is that this will be hugely profitable for Infosys – and therefore, by proxy, for Sunak himself.

People are asking the obvious question:

Note that it is unlikely that the people of the UK will benefit from this free trade deal, according to Jemma Forte; Sunak is negotiating a deal to benefit his family – again.

Remember: Parliament’s Commissioner for Standards has only just stated that Sunak broke the Ministerial Code – “inadvertently” – by failing to declare that a childcare firm in which his wife has shares will benefit from a change in Tory government policy. In the current instance, there can be no such excuse as we have the evidence in advance of the deal.

Infosys is also a multiple offender in terms of preferential treatment from Sunak’s government. After war broke out between Russia and Ukraine, that firm was told to stop operating in Russia or face sanctions like all the other businesses then doing business with that state, but eight months later it was found still to be doing business there, with impunity against the UK’s sanctions regime.

Sunak is expected to attend a G20 summit in India in two weeks – and to discuss the trade deal at a separate, bilateral, meeting with that nation’s prime minister Narendra Modi.

But Keir Starmer’s opposition party (still currently known as Labour, for reasons unknown) has called for Sunak to make an open declaration about his wife’s financial interests in a company that could profit immensely from his involvement in these negotiations.

One expert – Professor Alan Manning of the London School of Economics, according to The Guardian, wants the prime minister to recuse himself from any negotiations.

In response, it seems the Foreign Office has warned the Labour-chaired business and trade select committee not to visit India to examine the issues around a potential deal. The government department is refusing to help committee members set up meetings with Indian officials and businesspeople.

It seems clear, then, that Sunak has something to hide once again – otherwise, why try to cover up what will happen at the negotiations?

The deal, it seems, will allow Infosys to send teams of its Indian employees to the UK to work on outsourced IT contracts for firms in this country.

Why not employ home-grown expertise and keep the contracts – and all the profits arising from them – in the UK? Or has previous Tory government policy ensured that nobody here has the required expertise any more?

Of course, the controversy will only intensify the debate over MPs having business interests outside the House of Commons, or receiving donations and/or gifts-in-kind from businesses or corporate bosses.

The question here is: who does Rishi Sunak work for – the people of the UK or his wife’s family firm?

The answer seems obvious – with the best interests of the nation he is supposed to lead coming a distant second.

Reform is urgently required – but with so many Parliamentarian snouts firmly in the trough, there seems to be no will to put a stop to the corporate influence that is staining all of us with the filth of corruption. How do we force an end to it?


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Rishi Sunak just stops stopping oil – from our favourite correspondent

Over to our on-the-spot (he’s somewhere green) correspondent for a quick rundown of all the facts you need to know about Rishi Sunak’s new North Sea oil and gas drilling contracts:

(I thought you might enjoy this before I get festive about Sunak with an article about how upset the Tories have got about a photoshopped image of him handing over a badly-poured pint of beer – contrasted with the fact that they created a mechanism for pumping out lies about themselves. Coming soon!)


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The big Tory lie: new North Sea gas and oil might not even come back to the UK

Grant Shapps: he likes to spout a lot of nonsense from his base in Welwyn Hatfield (this image is from a BBC interview in 2020) but he’s not so smooth when faced with an interviewer who has checked the facts before talking to him.

The 100 new contracts granted by Rishi Sunak for energy companies to drill for gas and oil in the North Sea do not mean those fossil fuels will be used in the UK, as he falsely claimed.

The drilling will be done by commercial firms who will then sell the fossil fuels they find on the international market. Some of it may come back to the UK but most of it probably won’t.

Here are the facts, presented by Sky’s Jayne Secker to a spluttering Grant Shapps:

Notice how he tried to change the subject when the facts were presented to him?

Oh, these substances have to go to the UK because they are processed here. But that doesn’t mean they are used here.

Oh, but not all of them are used for fuel. Some are turned into plastics. But plastic pollution is harming the planet as badly as global warming.

Oh, but some of it is used for medical devices within the NHS. But that’s a tiny amount that would not justify the granting of any more drilling licences.

It seems ever-more-clear that the new licences are more likely to be a way for Sunak to corruptly reward companies like BP for signing contracts with his father-in-law’s firm Infosys than to improve the UK’s energy security.

If Sunak and/or his government wish to deny this, then there is a simple way to clear the air:

Let’s have an independent public inquiry into the awarding of these contracts: what they are intended to do; the way they have been presented to the public; what the actual consequences are likely to be – and who benefits?


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Is this the secret reason Rishi Sunak announced 100 oil and gas contracts in a global warming crisis?

Rishi Sunak: the face of naked Tory avarice.

It should come as no surprise to anybody that the oil and gas contracts Rishi Sunak announced in the middle of a global boiling crisis come with a suggestion of corruption.

Remember Infosys, the firm owned by Sunak’s father-in-law, in which his wife Akshata Murty has 38.9 million shares? The information on my screen says they’re estimated to be worth £89 million but that is likely to increase hugely now.

You see, Infosys has just “won” (it says here) a $1.5 billion contract with BP – one of the energy firms that will profit from those North Sea oil and gas contracts. People are suggesting that there’s something fishy about it all, and it isn’t just the water:

Now, with Infosys having secured its deal and having now done his deal, Sunak is off on his holibobs – apparently his first in four years:

You may not be aware of this, but Sunak recently launched what’s he’s calling a Business Council, allegedly to “turbocharge economic growth”.

Here’s a bit of information about it:

Infosys already has ties with Shell, as part of a partnership with “two of the top five integrated oil and gas companies, three of the top four oilfield services providers, and five of the top 10 upstream enterprises across the oil and gas landscape”:

The Byline Times article – from July 19 last year – warned us about Sunak’s ties with the fossil fuel industry:

Infosys’ intimate partnerships with regional as well as global oil and gas giants represent a potential conflict of interest for Rishi Sunak.

According to the UK Ministerial Code, ministers are required to fully disclose and explain the business interests of their spouses and families “which might give rise to a conflict” with the duties of Government.

Despite Sunak ostensibly committing to the Government’s net zero goals – now deemed unlawful by the High Court for not going far enough – he also said in the televised debate … that Britain must not move “too hard and too fast” on climate action.

His victory [in the Conservative leadership contest that was ongoing at the time] could represent a win for firms like Shell, which said it expected to revise upwards the value of oil and gas assets it had previously written down, triggering a jump in share prices.

When Sunak eventually released a list of his business interests – correct me if I’m wrong – the connections between his wife’s family firm and the oil companies that have just won very large and valuable contracts were not mentioned.

Scottish news organisation The National has also – just – published a list of fossil fuel polluters and climate change deniers that donate money to the Conservative Party. Have some of these won contracts in Sunak’s recent bonanza?

Taking it in the round, it seems unlikely that Sunak had the interests of the eco-system in mind when he was considering the possibility of new oil and gas contracts in the North Sea.

Indeed, it seems unlikely that he considered the well-being of anything other than his own financial affairs and those of his family.

It seems to This Writer that this entire situation – the contracts, the Business Council, the donations to the Tory Party – requires scrutiny, and by somebody entirely independent of Sunak and his Tories.

Can anybody recommend a mechanism by which this can be secured?


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Latest row over Sunak’s wife shows his new declaration of interests is worthless

Akshata Murty and her husband, UK prime minister Rishi Sunak: he has taken extraordinary steps to hide any commercial interests either of them have from the electorate. We must therefore conclude that he may be dishonestly using his position to funnel public money into his bank accounts and hers.

The row over whether Rishi Sunak’s wife benefited from the work that went into an ’emergency alert’ test affecting mobile phones on Sunday (April 23) shows one thing: the public do not believe the prime minister’s latest declaration of interests.

Sunak published a new register of MPs’ financial interests last week, in response to anger over his failure to declare that a company part-owned by Akshata Murty will benefit from a new policy to attract people into child-minding.

It doesn’t include significant details, either of his own personal financial investments or his wife’s.

Some of us have drawn the obvious conclusion: that Sunak thinks he and his wife are above such declarations – even though he takes public money, the same as the lowliest Universal Credit claimant.

And UC claimants have to declare their partners’ financial interests:

He didn’t even bother to turn up to an Urgent Question demanding a statement on his entry in the register, on the day the stink over alleged interest in the “emergency alert” broke out across the social media:

Instead, one of his lieutenants piped up to say it’s unreasonable to demand of the prime minister what his government demands of every benefit claimant. This confirms that Sunak thinks he’s better than the rest of us and doesn’t need to give an account of himself.

Apparently Sunak’s entry on the register includes his local rotary club, brass band and community pub but not any business interests owned by him or his wife.

The Byline Times article states:

A spokesperson for Sunak insisted that only such declarations judged to be “relevant” had been added to the list.

This means that while, according to Sunak, the fact the he is a patron of his local brass band is judged to be a “relevant” interest relating to his role as Prime Minister, the fact that his wife is now set to potentially massively financially benefit from a Government policy, is not.

Also not included in the new register are any of the Prime Minister’s own personal financial interests, save from the fact that they are now contained within what Downing Street refer to as a “blind management trust”.

This arrangement is ostensibly designed to prevent the Prime Minister from personally being involved in any future investment decisions that may be affected by his own policies.

However, by placing his existing investments within this “blind” arrangement, the public are prevented from ever knowing which Government policies are directly enriching the Prime Minister and his family.

It is hard to think of a reasonable justification for this continued refusal to be fully open about his own financial interests and those of his wife.

It is clear that Rishi Sunak is doing everything he can to prevent the rest of us from knowing how many commercial pies he and his wife have stuck their grubby fingers into.

It is dishonesty at the top level of government. No wonder he is currently being investigated over whether he has approved a policy that funnels money to a company part-owned by his wife. Other government contracts with companies owned by her should also be investigated.

The dishonesty implied by any investigation is exactly the opposite of what Sunak himself promised when he became prime minister.

By his own standards, he does not deserve to remain in office. There’s a local election next week in England and Northern Ireland; I hope voters there use it to drive that point home.


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The rumours about the emergency alert system were wrong, says the Cabinet Office

If you read this story after 3.23pm on April 24, you’ll know that the Cabinet Office has denied any connection between the new emergency alert system that was tested the day before, and Infosys, a company in which Rishi Sunak’s wife has shares.

That’s the government line and we have to accept it.

This Writer has to admit doubts. It seemed the contract for providing the service was originally awarded to Fujitsu, which partners with Infosys on some projects, despite it being involved in the fiasco over the Horizon system in UK post offices – but the Cabinet Office provided this link to a debate about it in the House of Lords.

In it, Cabinet Office Minister Baroness Neville-Rolfe said, “Fujitsu has had a small role in the development of the UK’s emergency alert system, initially providing a subject matter expert to support early development by DCMS.”

So the counter-claim is that the Department of Culture, Media and Sport developed the emergency alert system, and Fujitsu only provided an advisor.

Lord Arbuthnot of Edrom – also a Conservative – pointed out that awarding any contract to Fujitsu after the Horizon system “caused the sub-postmasters of this country to be shamefully accused of things that they had not done” seemed unreasonable, and the company should have been taken off the government’s procurement list altogether.

He said: “Some went to prison, some took their own lives and all those accused were humiliated in the eyes of their own communities. Fujitsu, which knew perfectly well what it was doing, has said not a single word of apology. This is already costing the Government hundreds of millions, potentially more.”

Baroness Neville-Rolfe responded that “all government contracts are awarded in line with procurement regulations and transparency guidelines, and that goes for the contract on the alerts”.

Considering what happened with Horizon, it doesn’t seem very convincing, does it?

Add to that the fact that Fujitsu has had a working relationship with Infosys since 2003, and in 2009 Infosys teamed up with Australian firm Telstra to create an emergency alert system in Australia, and it seems odd that Fujitsu would not employ any expertise in this field that its partner had.

Then again, the UK’s Tory government is not exactly known for making rational decisions.

That’s the best This Writer can say about it.


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Were you alarmed by the ’emergency alert’ test? Either way, this might trouble you

Alert: apparently the contract for the smartphone test that happened yesterday (April 23, 2023) was given to Fujitsu, the firm that bungled the Horizon Post Office software – and which immediately sub-contracted it to Infosys, the firm run by UK prime minister Rishi Sunak’s father-in-law, in which his wife holds millions of pounds worth of shares. Conflict of interest?

It seems the test of the ’emergency alert’ signal on everybody’s smartphone may be another example of Tory nepotism and corruption.

Here’s how:

The contract certainly went to Fujitsu – I have found articles here and here supporting that claim.

I have yet to find proof that it was sub-contracted to Infosys, although it is certainly true that the company owned by UK prime minister Rishi Sunak’s father-in-law, in which his wife holds millions of pounds worth of shares, has worked on other such systems in the past. If anybody can confirm or deny the claim, This Site would like to hear about it.

The Cabinet Office has been contacted for comment.

If it is the case, then I cannot recall Sunak ever declaring this interest when the contract was handed out. At a time when he is under investigation for failing to declare his interest in another government contract handed out to one of his wife’s companies… might this be damaging for him?

ADDITIONAL: A Government spokesperson said“This is completely untrue – there are no connections with Infosys in the running of the Emergency Alerts system.”

More information to follow in an article later.


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