Tag Archives: Mandelson

Reinstatement of Trevor Phillips shows that post-Corbyn Labour has turned TOWARDS racism

Trevor Phillips and Jeremy Corbyn: the contrast between the way Labour has treated these two men says everything about the party’s attitude – which is one of institutional racism under Keir Starmer.

Here’s the message that explains it all:

Ignore the doubletalk coming from Labour HQ; Jeremy Corbyn was removed from the party leadership because he was impeding the party’s descent into racism – not because he was a racist himself.

The reinstatement of Trevor Phillips just confirms it.

Phillips’s Labour Party membership was suspended in March last year, when Jeremy Corbyn was party leader, over comments he made about Muslims:

He also claimed that the centre of gravity of British Muslim opinion was “some distance away from the centre of gravity of everybody else’s” – prompting Labour MP Naz Shah to demand an explanation.

And Miqdaad Versi of the Muslim Council of Britain (MCB) said, “The statements he has made on a number of different things would not be statements that he would make against other communities.”

According to Labour procedures, Phillips’s case should have gone before a committee of the party’s National Executive Committee – but, after a delay of more than a year, that organisation was told last week that the case against him had been summarily dismissed.

Presumably, this means Keir Starmer decided to spit on the rules and made the decision on his own.

Why?

Well… he’s been spending a lot of time around Peter Mandelson lately.

Mandelson was the spin doctor behind Blairism and New Labour, and it could certainly be argued that Islamophobia was behind the decisions to go to war against Afghanistan and Iraq during Tony Blair’s leadership of the UK.

He is also a close friend of Trevor Phillips.

Consider also:

So: close friend of Mandelson; member of the same Labour branch as Starmer. And Mandelson and Starmer are as thick as thieves right now.

It seems Starmer has turned Labour into another old-school-tie network; a club for well-placed people who have personal interconnections. Doesn’t the Conservative Party already operate that kind of elitist, privileged, entitled system?

So much for the Equality and Human Rights Commission, then, and its demand that Labour’s political interference in its disciplinary process be halted. Keir Starmer vowed solemnly that he would follow that advice. Clearly, he lied.

But then, it seems the EHRC has been failing in its duties since it was created. Would you be surprised at this, knowing that its first chairman was… Trevor Phillips?

The links explained by Chris Williamson suggest wide-ranging, institutional corruption.

So-called centrist (in reality, so deeply into the right-wing of politics that they could be Tories) Labour MPs have rushed to defend the decision to reinstate Phillips. But they haven’t done a very good job. In the video below, Jess Phillips (no relation) seems to be suggesting that the Islamophobia accusations were inflated out of proportion in order to gain political advantage. The Prole Star draws an obvious parallel:

Note also that she was making her comments on a platform provided by the Board of Deputies of British Jews, which has its own questions to answer about political interference – especially in the case of Jeremy Corbyn.

Corbyn himself worked tirelessly to disentangle the party from the barrage of false accusations of anti-Semitism that it faced under his leadership. We now know (don’t we?) that he was undermined in these efforts by right-wing party officials who wanted to smear him in order to ensure that the Conservatives would beat him in a general election, forcing him out.

His reward was to be suspended from the Parliamentary Labour Party by Starmer so he now has to sit as an Independent MP – and now one of the party’s swivel-eyed right-wingers, Neil Coyle, has accused him of failing to declare financial support he received in order to fight the false claims against him.

So we see a huge dichotomy – a contrast between Labour’s attitude to anti-Semitism under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership and what it is doing now about Islamophobia under Starmer:

No wonder Muslims abandoned Labour en masse at the Batley & Spen by-election. The rest of us should do the same because of the outrageous mistreatment of Corbyn.

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Starmer is letting Tories order him around. Is this an unexpected twist in the lobbying scandal?

Keir Starmer: the face of shame, again.

We all know the Board of Deputies of British Jews is dominated by Conservatives, don’t we?

The use of anti-Semitism accusations may therefore be seen as a way for Tories to exert unwarranted influence over the Labour Party.

Now it seems they are extending that influence – by which I mean the following:

Labour leader Keir Starmer let a Tory-run organisation order him to reject an invitation to an interfaith event.

The Board of Deputies told Starmer to avoid the virtual Iftar event because one of its organisers is a member of Cage, an international advocacy organisation with a focus on Muslim detainees and communities impacted by the so-called War on Terror.

Apparently this person had shared a demand for a boycott of Israeli dates.

Is it true? Were there good reasons for it if it was? These questions are relevant but don’t really affect the core issue.

What matters is that Starmer let a Tory group order him around and that will never be acceptable in a Labour Party representative.

And at a time when he is trying to make mud stick on Boris Johnson and the Tories for letting former MPs and ministers, party donors and friends influence them, it is shocking that Starmer would show himself to be so easily-led by a Tory-led group.

The Twitterati have been having a field day:

This can only do further harm to Starmer’s chances in the local elections…

… but right-wing Labour is spinning like a top in its efforts to make him look supportable.

Labour is plummeting in the polls, with Starmer’s leadership the clearest reason, but that didn’t stop Peter – sorry, Lord – Mandelson taking a pop at former leader Jeremy Corbyn. He told Huffington Post‘s Paul Waugh:

“The memory of Jeremy Corbyn is still strong on the doorsteps amongst Labour voters here, it’s still coming up and I’m afraid we have still got some way to go before we rebuild the confidence and trust that we just threw away.”

No, Peter. It’s your boy Starmer who’s throwing away confidence and trust.

Meanwhile, the object of the Right’s continued enmity has managed to remain astonishingly equivocal about Starmer – but still couldn’t manage to say anything nice about him when questioned by LBC’s Iain Dale:

It is a class act – especially in contrast to that of Starmerites like Mandelson.

They fling dirt at Corbyn thick and fast – while he merely comments from experience about what a Labour leader should do.

One thing a Labour leader should never do is be seen to allow Tories to dictate his schedule to him.

Source: Starmer withdraws from Ramadan interfaith event after Board of Deputies warning | Jewish News

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McCluskey targeted again: he’s right to apologise – but not for anti-Semitism

Len McCluskey: his words were not anti-Semitic.

Unite union leader Len McCluskey has rightly apologised to Peter Mandelson for comments in a BBC Newsnight report – but claims that his words were anti-Semitic are wholly wrong.

Responding to disparaging comments from Mandelson about the Jeremy Corbyn era of the Labour Party, McCluskey had said that he should go away and “count his gold”.

As this had nothing to do with the matters under discussion – and seems intended as an insult – it is right that McCluskey has issued an apology:

Sadly some people have chosen to interpret McCluskey’s words as an anti-Semitic trope:

There’s just one problem with that interpretation – and it’s a big one:

Peter Mandelson is not Jewish.

Jewishness is handed down by female family members and Mandelson’s mother was a gentile. He isn’t Jewish.

And consider this: isn’t it strange that one person with Jewish ancestors is said to be Jewish (for the purpose of attacking someone else), while another person with Jewish ancestors was told repeatedly that she was not (for the purpose of attacking her), even though she did self-identify as such?

To me, this seems just another opportunistic lie, made to attack a person on the left wing of UK politics.

Type “McCluskey” into the search box on Twitter and you’ll be able to make a list of the names and handles of a large number of fellow travellers who support this lie. Some of them are well-known so it is worth making that list.

And, as there is (clearly) still a strong campaign to disparage and discredit people on the left wing of politics, let’s see if the same names crop up to support the next lie.

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Mandelson seeks caution on tuition fees – is it wrong to doubt his motives?

Know your enemy: If you want to know why Labour was so soft on business between 1997 and 2010, here's your answer - Peter (now Lord) Mandelson was in charge of Trade, Industry, and Business at various times throughout those Parliaments.

Know your enemy: If you want to know why Labour was so soft on business between 1997 and 2010, here’s your answer – Peter (now Lord) Mandelson was in charge of Trade, Industry, and Business at various times throughout those Parliaments.

Labour’s former Business Secretary, Peter Mandelson, wants the party to hold fire on any announcements about tuition fees until after the general election, making its policy known if Labour wins.

The reason stated in the BBC article is that “he recognises that any cut in tuition fees announced before the election would raise searching questions about how it would be funded”.

There’s just one problem with that.

We’ve all heard too many politicians say one thing before an election, only to do something completely different afterwards. David Cameron is a master of the pre-election lie. Undoubtedly there have been many more.

If no announcement is made at all, then no word has been given, so the party can’t go back on it.

Add to that the fact that Lord Mandelson is – well – Lord Mandelson, and Ed Miliband would be very ill-advised to pay him any attention on this.

Young people were bitterly betrayed when the Liberal Democrats turned their backs on the promise to abolish tuition fees and instead supported the Tory rip-off plan to make students pay, and pay, and pay.

Labour’s offer is only a drop in fees from £9,000 to £6,000 per year – it is not, therefore, the total abandonment of fees that students would welcome, so the party is on thin ice.

Let us hope this is one case where Mandelson cannot pull strings from behind the scenes.

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Why can’t Labour support working people AND be pro-business?

Know your enemy: If you want to know why Labour was so soft on business between 1997 and 2010, here's your answer - Peter (now Lord) Mandelson was in charge of Trade, Industry, and Business at various times throughout those Parliaments.

Know your enemy: If you want to know why Labour was so soft on business between 1997 and 2010, here’s your answer – Peter (now Lord) Mandelson was in charge of Trade, Industry, and Business at various times throughout those Parliaments.

Michael Meacher has missed a trick in his recent blog article about Lords Myners and Mandelson – who say they want Labour to be pro-business.

He correctly identifies these two peers – one of whom (Mandelson) is a Blairite Labour Party member and therefore might as well be a Tory, while the other (Myners) is not aligned to a political party and therefore might as well be a Tory – as being very rich and refers to them sarcastically as “those stalwart supporters of working people”, meaning the exact opposite.

He correctly states that they are wrong to claim that Ed Miliband’s attack on “predatory capitalism” is harmful to Labour’s election prospects, pointing to poll results showing that the next election winner needs to be tough on big business.

And he correctly – yes, Ukippers, correctly – points out that businesspeople know an in-out referendum on membership of the European Union could cause huge harm to their firms if the vote goes in favour of leaving.

These are all good points, but Mr Meacher could have gone much further.

Labour should be pushing its policies as better for business than anything the Conservatives have to offer – because they are.

The party wants more firms and public sector organisations to pay the living wage. As this blog has stated time and time again, this can only help British industry as it would show employees that their contribution is valued, encouraging them to improve the quality of their work and build up their employer’s profitability and prospects of expansion.

That’s not all that Labour can do. The party should be much bolder in its aims. For example:

The party should be promoting employee-ownership to more and more firms – the advantages of becoming co-operatives. Look at the success of John Lewis, whose employees receive a bonus equal to around four months’ extra pay – every year – because of the way that company is set up. John Lewis is going from strength to strength and so is its workforce. There is no valid argument against it.

Yes, there are some within the Labour Party who continue to push timid concepts about “strengthening” the minimum wage, but like Lords Myners and Mandelson, they might as well be Tories and it is time they were purged from the party. Neil Kinnock got rid of the Militant Tendency left-wingers; why shouldn’t Ed Miliband similarly divest himself of the right-wing fifth-columnist parasites who have held Labour back for his entire term as leader (including, of course, his idiot advisors)?

The Conservative Party’s idea of helping business has failed completely. It could never have done otherwise; starving the economy of money during a downturn makes it next-to-impossible for any but the largest firms to turn a profit.

Labour must present a vibrant alternative.

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