Tag Archives: members

#LabourFake – propaganda op falls flat as existence of new members is questioned

Keir Starmer: yes… yet another own goal.

Well, it has been truly said that the secret of good comedy is timing.

Only on Saturday night (February 19-20) I found myself watching an episode of Dave Gorman’s Modern Life is Goodish in which the star of the show discusses the shady practice of buying Twitter followers, and how you can tell them apart from real people.

Then on Sunday (February 20 – today, as I type this), I discover that suddenly the Labour Party has sprouted a throng of new members who don’t appear ever to have existed before – many of whom have very few followers of their own, which is a dead giveaway, really.

And all this after “Kiethy” was accused of having bought Twitter followers of his own. Around a third of his followers aren’t real people, it seems – possibly more by now, because people who have followed him in good faith may have turned away in disgust.

Amid the scepticism, there’s been plenty of opportunity for humour – of the gallows variety, admittedly. Some of us have been taking great joy in mocking the possibility that Keir Starmer’s new (and horrifying!) Labour policies would attract people with genuine (read: traditional) Labour values:

Once again, Starmer and his right-wing halfwitted cabal have made themselves – and the Labour Party they infest like parasites – look daft.

In their case it is an apt description. But the vast majority of Labour Party members deserve much, much better than this. Sadly, Starmer has changed party rules to ensure that they cannot demand it. The best they can do is leave (and there are far better organisations to join).

Was anybody actually stupid enough to believe this silly propaganda fail?

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After Evans won (rigged?) vote to remain Labour GenSec, here’s a recording of him saying he stripped members of their rights

Corrupt: Labour members who voted to keep David Evans as Keir Starmer’s general secretary won’t care that he’s as bent as a nine-bob note, but for those of us who prize honesty and integrity, this recording of him explaining that he deliberately worked to restrict the rights of left-wing, Corbyn-supporting members is reason enough to quit Labour forever and let it sink in its own corruption.

Funny how these things turn up after corrupt creeps like Evans get confirmed in their rotten jobs, isn’t it?

Still, it’s unlikely that it would have changed the result of the vote, which was carried, apparently, by Starmer and Evans’s right-wing robots.

It does show that Evans is corrupt, though – and indicates that Starmer is corrupt, by extension.

By rights, it’s enough evidence to force him to resign, making him the shortest-serving Labour general secretary ever. But these corrupt types never do the decent thing.

But it is more evidence to support a mass exodus from the party of Keir Starmer’s friends.

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Labour members are banned from talking about Corbyn – and they’re not taking it lying down

Still the most apt comment on Keir Starmer: his namesake Hardie obviously didn’t say those words but if he were alive today, he might well follow through on the threat.

It’s the new policy from the Labour leadership: do as we say, not as we do.

Why is it permissible for Keir Starmer, David Evans, Angela Rayner, Lisa bloody Nandy, uncle Tom Cobley and all in the shadow cabinet and the NEC to spout any tripe they like about the suspended former Labour leader, while gagging rank-and-file party members?

It isn’t, as far as This Writer can see. Party rules certainly don’t allow for it.

And party members aren’t standing for it.

The edict, mentioned in the Mirror yesterday, is a repeat of what Evans and Starmer said back on October 29 when Corbyn was suspended – and party members ignored it then, too.

There have been petitions and open letters signed by members from CLPs across the UK, and individuals have spoken out on the social media and in their own groups.

They will continue to do so, because the Labour Party was founded on the principle that everybody is equal and, in this case, Starmer and the others have led by example.

They made a huge fuss about Corbyn’s suspension when they announced it; they can’t complain about everybody else making a fuss about it now.

And the way they are tackling the issue has been likened to Russian politics under Stalin in the 1930s:

An MP who was at the meeting… said: “In 40 years I’ve never seen anything like it. It was a bit scary.

“It’s like 1938 in the USSR, with the show trials. I’m not, and never have been, a fan of JC but it makes me feel a bit nervous.”

Starmer will hate this comment. He has already been labelled Keir Stalin over his ham-handed handling of Corbyn’s suspension.

And worse was to follow as Labour – and ex-Labour members took to the social media to hammer him:

All of the above are good, valid comments but I would draw particular attention to the one below. Unlike the others, it comments on the posture adopted by Starmer and his cronies who are currently infesting the Labour Party’s top positions:

That is what rings true, in everything Starmer has done since he became party leader – ironically on a “continuity Corbyn” ticket.

He isn’t a socialist. He’s a neoliberal, cut from the same mould as Tony Blair, Iain McNicol and Peter Mandelson. He hates the socialism that swept Corbyn to the leadership and boosted party membership to more than half a million.

And that means if you are a Labour member who joined because of Corbyn, Keir Starmer hates you.

He will try to drive you out. He has probably succeeded in pushing out many of your colleagues already.

He is trying to annul the votes of those who have left from the current NEC elections, in order to gerrymander a victory for hard-right-wing candidates, because he thinks that will send you on your way.

He is proving, every day, that he fooled huge numbers of you; you elected to the head of a democratic socialist party a man who is neither a socialist nor a democrat.

He deserves all the exposure you can heap on him. So to Labour members I say: 

  • Ignore Keir Stalin’s dictat to stay silent about Jeremy Corbyn. If you all speak up, there’s nothing they can do about it.
  • Expose the inconsistencies in his posture. His closest colleagues have broken party rules and they have committed acts of genuine anti-Semitism. Why has he taken no action against them?
  • And demand that the party leadership return to following its own rules by suspending all those who have broken them – including Starmer himself.
  • Do not give up until you have won.

You are many – he and his cabal are few.

Source: Labour banned from talking about Jeremy Corbyn’s possible expulsion from party – Mirror Online

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Keir racism: Black Lives Matter isn’t a ‘moment’, mister


Keir Starmer just can’t help himself, can he?

Look at the arrogant racism in this statement:

He was telling us that, as far as he was concerned, Black Lives Matter was a photo opportunity and its time has now passed.

He doesn’t care about racism against black people or other ethnic minorities (and those of us wrapped up in Labour’s ongoing anti-semitism scandal should bear that in mind because it applies to Jews as much as anybody else).

He only cares about his approval ratings, and what will improve them in the “moment”.

But we’ve cottoned on to him:

Here’s a former Labour candidate in 2018’s local elections:

He’s not the only one to quit Labour either. Glance at the social media and you’ll see message after message from disillusioned members quitting the party – some of them after decades of support, sickened as Starmer turns it into a cesspit of right-wing factionalism and racism.

Perhaps this denouncement is the most damning:

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Who is the worst threat to Labour over the leaked report on right-wing factionalism?

For the many: it seems Labour’s apparent failure to live up to its slogan could do more damage to the party than a few defamation/data protection claims.

How surprising to see The Guardian reporting on a financial threat to Labour after a report was leaked alleging misconduct by party officers that meant the party lost the 2017 general election!

Instead of stating that rank-and-file party members were getting together to demand their subscriptions – that they could argue were taken under false pretences as party officers were working against winning the election…

I found that the people accused of the misconduct are planning to sue the party for defamation and data protection offences.

On one hand I am encouraged by this. I have taken Labour to court over data protection offences after (false) information about me was leaked to the national press by a party officer.

The fact that others are considering the same suggests that I was well within my rights to accuse the party (because, as data controller, it has ultimate responsibility for leaks).

On the other, it is doubtful that any defamation claims should be allowed to go anywhere – at least, not yet.

The information about party members in the report is taken from emails and WhatsApp messages that were placed in the hands of party investigators legitimately and it would be premature for anybody to launch lawsuits on the basis of it, until evidence is brought forward that disproves it.

Also, consider the words of the lawyer concerned, Mark Lewis. He said: “For four years, people in Labour have said there is no antisemitism in the party, it’s just a smear. Now they say that of course there was antisemitism, ‘but it just wasn’t us’. They have not noticed the absurdity of their change of position.”

Nobody in Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour leadership said there was no anti-Semitism in the party. I haven’t said that. None of the other higher-profile members who were accused has made that suggestion (to my knowledge).

So who, exactly made that claim? I notice that Mr Lewis did not elaborate on its origin and that is another reason to doubt the usefulness of these threatened lawsuits.

Are they just an attempt to bully the current Labour leadership? Why would anybody expect that to work?

On the other hand, going back to the wider party membership, it seems far more likely that action brought by rank-and-file members would succeed in restoring their subscription money to them.

If enough people do this, then it could put Labour in serious financial difficulty.

And it is entirely possible that the party would deserve to be put in that predicament – if the allegations in the report turn out to be accurate.

Source: Labour party faces financial peril over leaked report | Politics | The Guardian

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Here’s how equality watchdog’s threatened investigation of Labour may be worthwhile

Would it surprise you to read that This Writer would welcome an investigation into Labour’s handling of anti-Semitism cases?

If so, you may be even more surprised to discover that I have written to the Equalities and Human Rights Commission, encouraging it to start such a probe.

Of course, there is a caveat which I’m sure wasn’t part of the submissions by the Campaign Against Antisemitism or the Jewish Labour Movement.

Rather than restricting itself to investigating whether Labour discriminated against Jews, I asked for the EHRC to find out whether the party has wronged any party members at all.

I’ve been through Labour’s complaints procedure myself, remember.

The party failed to follow its own rules, and in fact expelled me on the basis of a rule that didn’t even exist when I wrote whatever it was I wrote that someone found so offensive.

Oh, and I don’t even know who accused me. That information was never passed to me so, in legal terms, no such person exists.

The party’s disciplinary tribunal found against me because its members had been told to find against me in the particulars of the case that were passed to it (and me) by the party’s National Executive Committee.

The reasons given for finding against me had nothing to do with the particulars of the case.

This is because the charges themselves, the evidence, the rules and the reasons were all secondary considerations. I had to go because I was a left-of-centre party member who had been accused of anti-Semitism – and in Labour at the moment, accusation is the same as guilt.

The party discriminated against me because of the protected characteristic of “race” – I suffered indirect racial discrimination – and therefore may be investigated by the EHRC.

I continue to suffer harassment from members of the Labour Party – and others – who describe me using insulting and offensive names as a result of the Labour Party’s discriminatory treatment of me and its decision to put the desires of people who claimed to represent people of a particular ethnicity above the facts.

It’s an unusual case because it is about the abuse of equality rules to victimise the innocent.

I think the EHRC would be unwise to refuse to investigate it.

After all, there’s no point in having a law if people are allowed to abuse it.

Source: Equality watchdog to decide if Labour broke law over antisemitism | News | The Guardian

New plan means local Labour members will have a chance to choose election candidates

All smiles: Jennie Formby and Jeremy Corbyn know the plan to give local Labour members greater control over the selection of Parliamentary candidates will be hugely popular.

This is interesting, from Skwawkbox:

[A Labour] NEC source has told the SKWAWKBOX that the NEC has made a statement of intent – and of the party’s preparedness for a new general election – by authorising Labour general secretary Jennie Formby to prepare a plan to ensure that CLPs have the opportunity to call a selection process if they so wish, even if Theresa May calls a new ‘snap’, short-campaign general election.

On the face of it, this is excellent news. It means constituency Labour Party members will be able to end the cronyism that corrupted New Labour, when candidates were parachuted into safe seats because it suited the leadership of the time.

But there’s no plan yet, and rumours are circulating that an election may take place as early as February 28.

If she was minded to do so, it would be in Theresa May’s interest to call an election before Labour can put candidates in place who will command the support of the general public, rather than just party loyalists.

And Labour’s NEC cannot meet to approve any plan that Ms Formby concocts until March.

I’m not saying Mrs May will call an election – just that she would be wise to do it before Labour is prepared.

But then, who could ever accuse Theresa May of wisdom?

Visit our JustGiving page to help Vox Political’s Mike Sivier fight anti-Semitism libels in court


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The Conservatives are now the Party of Upskirting

Selfie-centred: This has never happened (thank goodness) but it is exactly the kind of thing Sir Christopher Chope was supporting.

The practice of taking photographs of female celebrities’ private parts by pointing a camera up their skirts or dresses has won a ringing endorsement from Conservative backbencher Sir Christopher Chope and his ever-willing henchman Phillip Davies.

Mr Chope filibustered a private members’ bill calling for upskirting to be criminalised. Along with his supporters, he spoke for a total of four hours in order to prevent the legislation from progressing through Parliament.

He has defended this indefensible behaviour by saying he hates private members’ bills – shurely shome mishtake as he has tabled dozens of them himself:

Mr Davies is on the record as a supporter of men’s rights, which he believes are being eroded by feminists. Does he believe men have a right to examine the quality of a lady’s underwear if she doesn’t agree to it?

Prime minister Theresa May has expressed her own dissatisfaction with the outcome:

But she was lying again, I expect. If Mrs May was all that upset about it, she would have punished her errant MPs, perhaps by withdrawing the Tory whip from them.

But that would mean losing her majority in Parliament.

So her hands are tied.

And for all her fine words, her actions show tacit support for what her MPs did.

The official Conservative Party twitter feed also tried to de-legitimise the backbenchers’ point of view as an expression of Tory taste…

… and failed:

On Twitter, some of the usual suspects have been having a fine time satirising the sexists on the Tory benches:

One has to ask, though – why defend this intrusive and demeaning behaviour?

Other than perversion for its own sake, what exactly is the point of upskirting?

What do the paps who profane themselves with this practice possibly hope to find?

A long-lost masterpiece by Van Gogh?

The Titanic sailing back into harbour at long last?

Extraterrestrial life?

No.

The best they can hope to see, no matter how many such photos they take…

… is what Christopher Chope sees every time he looks in a mirror.

MPs are due to vote on giving the vote to people aged 16 and 17. Will you ask your MP to attend?

Members of Parliament are being asked to support a private members’ bill to give the vote to young people aged 16 and 17.

The problem is, the vote on the Representation of the People (Young People’s Enfranchisement and Education) Bill – 2nd reading will take place on Friday, when many MPs travel back to their constituencies to carry out business there.

People aged 16 and 17 were able to vote in the Scottish independence referendum of 2014, and this led to a huge increase in the number of people that age taking an interest in democracy.

No doubt filibusterers like Philip Davies and Jacob Rees-Mogg are awaiting their chance to hang around the green benches and talk the bill out. The only way to stop this is to have enough MPs supporting the bill on hand to demand a vote.

So, what do you think?

Will you ask your MP to stay and take part? Or are you happy with the system as it is?

At least one MP, besides Jon Trickett, has promised to attend:

Where will yours be?


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Could this be the beginning of the end for MPs who ‘talk out’ private members’ bills?

Christopher Chope (left) and Philip Davies (right) ‘talked out’ a private member’s bill to end ‘revenge’ evictions by private landlords.

Perhaps you think it’s okay that private members’ bills – attempts at making laws that are not part of a government’s programme – can be stopped by the likes of Philip Davies and Jacob Rees-Mogg.

These buffoons gleefully block useful legislation such as the bid to give free hospital parking to carers (while Mr Davies charged his own parking to the taxpayer, please note) and the proposal to force landlords to ensure their properties are fit for human habitation (Mr Davies himself is a landlord).

They happily hide behind a Commons rule that a “closure” motion, stopping a Bill from being talked out, can be called if its sponsor can muster 100 MPs to support it – and the legislation should not pass if it does not have the support of 100 MPs.

But this argument ignores the fact that private members’ bills are always debated on Fridays, when most MPs are returning to their constituencies to carry out the work they have to do there.

The solutions proposed by Mr Bercow are reasonable, and would enhance Parliament’s reputation by ensuring private members’ bills are of a sufficiently high quality and that they receive the same consideration in the Commons chamber as other legislation.

They could also mark the end of interference by MPs with their own interests at heart, rather than those of the public. One wonders what Philip Davies would do with himself then.

The Commons Speaker, John Bercow, has suggested the system by which backbench MPs bring in legislation needs to be overhauled.

At present, private members’ bills receive limited debate on Fridays and they stand little chance of becoming law without government support.

It is common for MPs opposing such a bill to talk at length until it runs out of time.

Mr Bercow said this situation “has not enhanced the reputation of the House”.

The Speaker highlighted recommendations previously made by the Procedure Select Committee, including:

  • Moving private members’ bills from their traditional Friday sitting, when MPs often return to their constituencies
  • Introducing a “peer group review” with the aim of ensuring fewer, higher-quality bills
  • Enabling time limits on speeches in such debates.

Source: Speaker calls for rethink on private members’ bills – BBC News


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