Tag Archives: Murthy

Isn’t it time for an investigation into Tory donors that get huge government contracts?

Backhander: have the Tories been funnelling public money to their friends and donors in return for practically nothing? And if so, shouldn’t these people face justice?

Take a look at this:

The claims in the image appear to be accurate.

This is just one of many accounts showing that Tory friends and donors have benefited from government contracts.

The latest apparent beneficiary is Akshata Murty, the wife of the prime minister himself – Rishi Sunak.

Yet all these financial arrangements go uninvestigated.

Personally, I think retweeting the message above might not be enough to achieve the necessary.

By all means do, but consider contacting your own MP as well, to express your own desire for an investigation into connections between Tory MPs and party or personal donors who receive large business contracts – especially deals that, for one reason or another – fall through.

Such bad deals endanger lives – as we discovered during the Covid crisis, when huge amounts of duff personal protective equipment were bought by the Tories from donors and friends, when reliable gear could have been purchased from reputable sources – that didn’t have friends in the Tory government.

It is in the national interest for us to find out for sure what has been going on.


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The rumours about the emergency alert system were wrong, says the Cabinet Office

If you read this story after 3.23pm on April 24, you’ll know that the Cabinet Office has denied any connection between the new emergency alert system that was tested the day before, and Infosys, a company in which Rishi Sunak’s wife has shares.

That’s the government line and we have to accept it.

This Writer has to admit doubts. It seemed the contract for providing the service was originally awarded to Fujitsu, which partners with Infosys on some projects, despite it being involved in the fiasco over the Horizon system in UK post offices – but the Cabinet Office provided this link to a debate about it in the House of Lords.

In it, Cabinet Office Minister Baroness Neville-Rolfe said, “Fujitsu has had a small role in the development of the UK’s emergency alert system, initially providing a subject matter expert to support early development by DCMS.”

So the counter-claim is that the Department of Culture, Media and Sport developed the emergency alert system, and Fujitsu only provided an advisor.

Lord Arbuthnot of Edrom – also a Conservative – pointed out that awarding any contract to Fujitsu after the Horizon system “caused the sub-postmasters of this country to be shamefully accused of things that they had not done” seemed unreasonable, and the company should have been taken off the government’s procurement list altogether.

He said: “Some went to prison, some took their own lives and all those accused were humiliated in the eyes of their own communities. Fujitsu, which knew perfectly well what it was doing, has said not a single word of apology. This is already costing the Government hundreds of millions, potentially more.”

Baroness Neville-Rolfe responded that “all government contracts are awarded in line with procurement regulations and transparency guidelines, and that goes for the contract on the alerts”.

Considering what happened with Horizon, it doesn’t seem very convincing, does it?

Add to that the fact that Fujitsu has had a working relationship with Infosys since 2003, and in 2009 Infosys teamed up with Australian firm Telstra to create an emergency alert system in Australia, and it seems odd that Fujitsu would not employ any expertise in this field that its partner had.

Then again, the UK’s Tory government is not exactly known for making rational decisions.

That’s the best This Writer can say about it.


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Were you alarmed by the ’emergency alert’ test? Either way, this might trouble you

Alert: apparently the contract for the smartphone test that happened yesterday (April 23, 2023) was given to Fujitsu, the firm that bungled the Horizon Post Office software – and which immediately sub-contracted it to Infosys, the firm run by UK prime minister Rishi Sunak’s father-in-law, in which his wife holds millions of pounds worth of shares. Conflict of interest?

It seems the test of the ’emergency alert’ signal on everybody’s smartphone may be another example of Tory nepotism and corruption.

Here’s how:

The contract certainly went to Fujitsu – I have found articles here and here supporting that claim.

I have yet to find proof that it was sub-contracted to Infosys, although it is certainly true that the company owned by UK prime minister Rishi Sunak’s father-in-law, in which his wife holds millions of pounds worth of shares, has worked on other such systems in the past. If anybody can confirm or deny the claim, This Site would like to hear about it.

The Cabinet Office has been contacted for comment.

If it is the case, then I cannot recall Sunak ever declaring this interest when the contract was handed out. At a time when he is under investigation for failing to declare his interest in another government contract handed out to one of his wife’s companies… might this be damaging for him?

ADDITIONAL: A Government spokesperson said“This is completely untrue – there are no connections with Infosys in the running of the Emergency Alerts system.”

More information to follow in an article later.


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Sunak’s caginess over his wife’s shares is suspicious – because of what they’ve done

Akshata Murty and her husband, UK prime minister Rishi Sunak: it is hard to believe their actions have been entirely innocent.

There’s a lot of “nothing to see here, guv” about the way the government – and Rishi Sunak in particular – has handled the controversy over it handing public money to firms in which his wife holds shares.

After it was found that Akshata Murty had shares in Koru Kids, a childcare agency set to benefit from a policy in last month’s budget, Sunak has published a new list of his own financial interests including it. It seems to have been omitted previously.

We have also heard that the government has awarded a contract to her father’s firm Infosys, in which she also has shares. This business was found to be operating in Russia after the government imposed sanctions on any commercial operation doing so, and its bosses promised to withdraw from that country after the transgression was discovered.

It was subsequently revealed that Infosys had not withdrawn from Russia immediately – but Sunak’s government gave it a contract worth a small fortune anyway.

So that’s two infringements – of government policy and Parliamentary rules – in favour of Rishi Sunak’s wife.

Before either of them, we learned that Ms Murty had avoided paying £20 million in taxes by holding non-domiciled tax status. This created a huge stink as she was understood to be living in the prime minister’s Downing Street flat with him – a tax avoider living in the heart of government.

There were calls for Sunak to be removed as prime minister over it.

But then Ms Murty agreed to give up her non-dom status and start paying the full amount of UK taxes.

That leads to the very obvious question posed in the second of the two tweets below:

“If Rishi Sunak’s wife is suddenly prepared to hand over several million to keep her husband in a £150k job… you really need to think about why this might be.”

Yes, indeed.

The logical inference from it all is that he has been using his position in that job to funnel huge amounts of cash into private firms in which his wife has an interest. Do we even know if he has declared all her shareholdings now?

Public opinion seems clear:

It is all speculation. But the facts on which it is based are irrefutable.

Akshata Murty did give up her non-dom status and agree to pay millions of pounds in tax, in order to ensure her husband stayed in his £150k-per-year job.

And Rishi Sunak’s government did hand large amounts of money to private businesses in which his wife had shares.

It’s extremely hard to see any of it as innocent.


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Murty’s meltdown? Firm connected to PM’s wife loses millions

Akshata Murty and her husband, UK prime minister Rishi Sunak: has she been using her connection with a leading UK politician to gain advantages for her firms? Is she now losing support after Sunak fell under investigation for a possible conflict of interest? Or is it all just coincidental?

A firm connected to Rishi Sunak’s wife Akshata Murty has lost a fortune on the stock exchange.

The losses are being reported on the day an investigation was launched into whether Sunak failed to correctly report a conflict of interest; Ms Murty is a shareholder in a firm that will profit from a Budget incentive to recruit childminders.

It seems another of her investments that made the headlines because of government policy has taken a major loss on the stock market.

Remember Infosys, the company that carried on trading in Russia after the government sanctioned such firms?

Infosys claimed in April last year that it was closing its office in Russia – providing a lucky escape for the then-Chancellor, who had refused to take any action about the company’s continued commercial interest in a country that the UK should have been shunning.

Then – exactly a month ago – we discovered that Infosys was still operating in Russia, eight months after it said it would withdraw, and had been given a £1.8 million government contract in spite of this.

Now:

So her shares, which were worth £400 million this morning, are now worth £351 million – in a company for which, like Koru Kids, Sunak broke – or at least seriously bent – government rules.

Had she been using her connection with a leading UK politician to gain advantages for her firms? Is she now losing support after Sunak fell under investigation for a possible conflict of interest?

Or is it a coincidence? It will be interesting to find out.


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Rishi Sunak investigated by standards commissioner over childcare conflict of interest

Partners in (the) climb: Akshata Murty and her husband, UK prime minister Rishi Sunak.

UK prime minister Rishi Sunak is facing investigation over whether he properly declared his wife’s interest in a childcare agency that may benefit from a new policy announced in the spring Budget.

Sunak’s wife Akshata Murty is listed as a shareholder in Koru Kids, a childcare agency that is likely to benefit from a pilot scheme offered by Jeremy Hunt to incentivise people to become childminders, with £1,200 offered to those who train to become one through an agency.

It is believed that he is being investigated over whether a declaration of interest in this organisation was “open and frank”, under rules set out by the commissioner for standards.

This Site has discussed the situation previously, here. It seems the authorities got around the question of Sunak having to grant permission to be investigated by the independent adviser on ministerial interests (Laurie Magnus) by handing it to the standards commissioner (Daniel Greenberg).

This Writer doubts the investigation will lead to any great censure of Sunak.

The initiative to encourage people to become childminders may very well benefit children and carers alike – because it is calculated to bring more people into the job market, which is what the Tories want.

Ms Murty is not the only business boss who will benefit from it, and indeed Koru Kids is not her only business interest, so it can hardly be argued that the policy was introduced purely as a money-spinner for the prime minister and his family.

Still, he did fail to declare his interest to the Commons Liaison committee when asked, and not only should he be made to apologise and correct the record, but he should also take steps to ensure that every other government minister knows they have an obligation to list their own interests correctly, at appropriate times.

But what will happen next? Keep watching this space…


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Steve Baker calls for Guru-Murthy sacking after accepting apology. What a c… (STRONG LANGUAGE)

Steve Baker: what a- well, I think the description is now best described as rhyming slang for his Tory colleague Jeremy Hunt.

Tory MP Steve Baker has said he hopes Channel 4 sacks journalist Krishnan Guru-Murthy after telling him he “appreciates” an apology for being called something very rude, live on air.

The incident occurred after what Guru-Murthy called a “very robust” interview on events in Westminster yesterday.

Suella Braverman resigned as home secretary, chief whip Wendy Morton and her deputy Craig Whittaker reportedly threatened to quit, and it was alleged that Tory MPs were bullied into supporting the government in a vote on fracking that was seen as a mark of confidence in Liz Truss’s government.

After the interview concluded, this happened:

Obviously it shouldn’t have but it did – and Guru-Murthy later reported in a tweet that he had “reached out” to Baker to apologise.

Baker then accepted the apology: “I appreciate you apologising. Thank you,” he wrote.

But Baker then told John Pienaar on Times Radio that he hoped Channel 4 would sack Guru-Murthy.

He said: “If it’s in breach of his code of conduct, I do hope they sack him – it would be a service to the public.”

Accepting an apology for a transgression and then demanding further action over it is exactly the behaviour of the kind of person Guru-Murthy had described, in his description of the MP.

So there it is. Steve Baker – what a … “Jeremy Hunt”.

Source: Krishnan Guru-Murthy apologises for calling Steve Baker ‘a c***’ during livestream | The Independent

Sunak’s non-dom wife to pay UK tax on overseas income after being dragged to it

Rishi Sunak: I use this image a lot because I think it looks like his “nervous” face. Trouble is, it might also be his “angry” face. 

UK Chancellor Rishi Sunak’s non-domiciled wife Akshata Murthy has agreed to pay tax in the UK on her overseas income after he came under fire for it.

Her decision to change her tax arrangements follows accusations of hypocrisy against the chancellor, with opposition parties saying Mr Sunak’s family is benefiting at a time when the cost of living is going up.

The BBC estimates Ms Murty would have avoided £2.1m a year in UK tax through her non-dom status.

Ms Murty said her tax arrangements had been “entirely legal”, but added: “It has become clear that many do not feel it is compatible with my husband’s role as chancellor.

“I understand and appreciate the British sense of fairness and I do not wish my tax status to be a distraction for my husband or to affect my family,” she said.

It’s the right choice – but This Writer can’t help thinking it’s for the wrong reason.

As the wife of the UK’s Chancellor of the Exchequer, Ms Murthy was rightly expected by the people of the UK to accept the same tax conditions as were being forced on us by her husband,

But it never occurred to her to do that. She had to be dragged to it.

This happens with politicians – and I’m not going to blame just the Tories for it – and those connected to them, all the time.

She was happy to take dividends from one of her companies based in Russia, while the rest of us were sanctioning that country and its businesses – until she was found out.

She was happy to avoid UK tax by claiming non-dom status – until she was found out.

And it does reflect poorly on Sunak himself; he must have known that it was not a reputable way to behave but he allowed it to happen all the same.

And then he tried to brazen it out by claiming he was being discredited by proxy and that his wife was being used to attack him.

He knew that his job made it wrong. If he didn’t, he should not be in that job – or in Parliament.

Have YOU donated to my crowdfunding appeal, raising funds to fight false libel claims by TV celebrities who should know better? These court cases cost a lot of money so every penny will help ensure that wealth doesn’t beat justice.

https://www.crowdjustice.com/case/mike-sivier-libel-fight/


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Nobody needs a plan to discredit Rishi Sunak – they only have to quote his record

Campaign to discredit: is Kwasi Kwarteng trying to destroy Rishi Sunak? Or does the Chancellor deserve all the criticism he receives after raising our taxes but (allegedly) avoiding paying his own while his wife did the same?

Rishi Sunak is trying to curry sympathy from the public by pretending that somebody has launched a campaign to discredit him by linking him with the way his wife avoids paying UK tax.

He is – as in so many of his political choices – completely wrong.

Nobody needs to use his wife to discredit Sunak – they only need to look at his own decisions:

  1. He vetoed a plan to save the poorest families from soaring energy bills, according to a government leak.

Three options were put forward: increasing the £200 loan payment for all households (to be paid in the autumn) to “£500 or more”, either for all households or for the poorest; delaying repayment of the £200, which the Treasury is saying must be repaid at the rate of £40 a year over the following five years; or exempting the poorest homes from the need to repay at all, turning the loan into a grant.

Sunak apparently refused to consider any of these options, which are said to have come from Kwasi Kwarteng’s Business, Innovation and Skills Department. If he really does think fellow members of the government are briefing the press against him, then Kwarteng seems a likely candidate for suspicion.

2. He blocked plans to reduce millions of energy bills by making homes more energy efficient, according to another government leak.

It seems both Downing Street and Kwarteng’s team were hoping for an expansion of the Energy Company Obligation (Eco) scheme to be included in this week’s energy security strategy, with £200 million extra per year meaning the scheme could be expanded beyond only those receiving benefits to thousands more people.

Sunak apparently rejected the ideas because he is sticking to pledges he made in autumn 2021 – even though inflation means his tax take is around two-and-a-half times what he expected to make from those proposals and he is entirely capable of doing as suggested.

3. He has benefited from his non-dom wife’s ability to avoid paying UK tax while increasing the tax burden on the rest of us to its highest level since World War 2.

As Akshata Murthy’s husband, Sunak shares his household with her and must, therefore, enjoy some of the benefits of her income. As a non-dom living in the UK, she has been able to avoid paying an estimated £2.1 million per year.

Sunak himself is said to have held a US Green Card, which allows people to live and work permanently in the United States but demands that he pay US tax on his worldwide income, until October last year – long after he became Chancellor in 2020 – meaning he may have avoided paying UK tax for the more-than-four years between that date and his joining the government in 2017.

Meanwhile, by freezing the thresholds at which people move into different tax bands, Sunak has ensured that more people are paying Income Tax at higher rates; he has also introduced a 10 per cent increase in National Insurance payments. The tax burden on UK citizens who have no choice other than to pay up is now at its highest level since the mid-1940s.

It’s a filthy record; it reads more like a charge sheet than a history of achievements.

But Rishi Rich still wants you to believe he and his wife are being smeared by malicious colleagues.

Isn’t it more accurate to say that the skeletons in his closet are coming to light at last?

Have YOU donated to my crowdfunding appeal, raising funds to fight false libel claims by TV celebrities who should know better? These court cases cost a lot of money so every penny will help ensure that wealth doesn’t beat justice.

https://www.crowdjustice.com/case/mike-sivier-libel-fight/


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Why is Rishi Sunak’s wife allowed to avoid tax by claiming non-dom status?

Slimy: Sunak.

Insult upon injury: remember the indirect income Rishi Sunak was getting via his wife’s interest in a company connected to Russia? It seems she wasn’t even paying tax on it!

So Sunak has saved millions of pounds from his own family’s tax bill while piling massive tax hikes on the hard-working people of the UK.

What a shocking betrayal of his duties as Chancellor.

Here are the facts as they are understood at the time of writing:

Rishi Sunak’s millionaire wife has claimed non-domicile status in order to save on her tax bill while her husband was chancellor.

Akshata Murthy, whose family business is estimated to be worth around £3.5bn, has continued to use the valuable tax status even after Mr Sunak was put in charge of setting taxes for the country in February 2020, according to two people familiar with her financial arrangements.

So-called ‘non-dom’ status is entirely lawful and can save an individual from paying UK tax on income from dividends from foreign investments, rental payments on property overseas or bank interest. The status also means that you avoid UK inheritance tax.

The decision to pay less tax through non-dom status is optional.

It is not known exactly how much has been saved by Ms Murthy but sources told The Independent it could have saved her millions of pounds in tax on foreign earnings over several years.

In a statement issued after publication, a spokesperson for Ms Murthy claimed that she had to use non-dom status because of her Indian citizenship.

The spokesperson said: “Akshata Murty is a citizen of India, the country of her birth and parent’s home.

“India does not allow its citizens to hold the citizenship of another country simultaneously. So, according to British law, Ms Murty is treated as non-domiciled for UK tax purposes. She has always and will continue to pay UK taxes on all her UK income.”

Doesn’t look good, does it?

The Independent article provides an analysis of what Ms Murthy could have saved, in comparison with what a UK citizen would have paid, on her Infosys income:

Dividends from Infosys calculated from Ms Murthy’s stake in the company, of 0.93 per cent – worth approximately £725 million based on recent market valuations – suggest the payments could have totalled around £11.6 million in the past year.

As a non-dom, Ms Murthy would not have had to pay tax on these dividend payments in the UK. That compares to an ordinary UK resident, who, paying tax on dividends at the so-called ‘additional rate’ (for all dividend payments over the personal allowance) would have to pay tax of 38.1 per cent on the payouts.

The special status could therefore have saved her a bill of around £4.4m in tax, although she may have incurred tax liabilities overseas.

There you have it.

Sunak seems to have enjoyed huge – indirect – tax breaks through his wife while inflicting the highest tax burden in more than 70 years on the rest of us.

If she’s only allowed to be Indian, is it time Ms Murthy slunk back there, taking her slimy husband with her?

Source: Revealed: Rishi Sunak’s millionaire wife avoids tax through non-dom status | The Independent

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