Tag Archives: poem

‘Dogmeat wrapped in the Union Flag’: new poem highlights Boris Johnson’s incompetence and lies [STRONG LANGUAGE]

Boris Johnson: ‘Dogmeat wrapped in the Union Flag’.

I wonder what Boris Johnson thinks of David Hare’s poem immortalising some of the prime minister’s worst mistakes, lies and corruption for all time?

He probably hasn’t heard it and will want to ignore it.

But you don’t have to!

Here’s Agony Uncle:

Mr Hare is a multi-award-winning playwright and director. He doesn’t seem to be known as a poet, though.

This Writer feels sure he has blown any chance of becoming Poet Laureate, in any case!

But he has done the public a great service. This is how history should remember Boris Johnson.

Is this the last word on the ‘Fatima’ re-skilling advert that the Tories had to withdraw?


Remember this?

I’ve already produced one article about it but this was too good to omit.

It speaks for itself, I think:

Have YOU donated to my crowdfunding appeal, raising funds to fight false libel claims by TV celebrities who should know better? These court cases cost a lot of money so every penny will help ensure that wealth doesn’t beat justice.

https://www.crowdjustice.com/case/mike-sivier-libel-fight/


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This Sugar is NOT sweet: Outrage over Lord’s anti-Corbyn poem [STRONG LANGUAGE]

Sexist rant: Lord Sugar.

Lord Sugar is a microcosm of what’s wrong with Tory Britain – a wealthy businessman who thinks he can say anything he wants without censure.

Only a few days ago, he deleted a disgusting tweet showing a photoshopped image of Jeremy Corbyn with Adolf Hitler – an appalling lapse of taste at a time when Mr Corbyn was facing false accusations of anti-Semitism.

Now Lord Sugar has compounded his crime by tweeting a perverse poem, again attacking Mr Corbyn.

Here’s the tweet. I’ve taken a screenshot rather than linking to the tweet itself, in case he deletes it:

Reactions have – of course – been overwhelmingly negative:

https://twitter.com/JamesHolah/status/981867378161147909

Here’s one extremely serious point which Lord Sugar should have considered before he released his ill-judged verses:

It’s true that Lord Sugar’s tweet is yet another example of abuse against Diane Abbott – and of sexism against women in general.

This is not behaviour befitting a Lord of the Realm.

But it seems he is determined to continue these inappropriate rants.

Clearly he thinks he is above retribution. Somebody should prove him wrong. It seems clear his ennoblement was premature. Time he was stripped of it.


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One in the ear for Michael Gove

Here’s one for all beleaguered teachers across Britain – but it’s for their pupils as well.

I was pointed towards this by another blog (alittleecon – look it up). It was posted less than a week ago but has already won a huge following, including many teachers.

I’d like to ask for school pupils to take a look at it too. If you’ve ever spent time in class waiting for the bell to ring and wishing your teacher would stop bothering you because you just don’t care, listen to this and understand why.

If enough school-goers saw, and heard, and listened to this poem, it might completely change their attitude to teachers and teaching.

And if enough parents saw, and listened, and thought about what this poem says – about their own lives and the lives their children can expect thanks to the worst-ever British government, perhaps it might persuade them to think again before putting their cross next to the Conservative candidate at the next few elections.

It isn’t rocket science.

And to Jess Green, if you’re reading this, I’m looking forward to your next poem.

Follow me on Twitter: @MidWalesMike

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Trench poetry collection cements comics’ dedication to WW1 authenticity

The reality of war: This forthcoming collection, adapting World War One poetry into comics form, might teach Michael Gove a thing or two about factual accuracy.

The reality of war: This forthcoming collection, adapting World War One poetry into comics form, might teach Michael Gove a thing or two about factual accuracy.

Michael Gove won’t like what follows.

But then, he probably thinks that comics are a waste of everybody’s time; children should be too busy reciting their times tables and adults should be sweating on the fracking site or slaving at the workfarehouse. Right?

Too bad. Following on from yesterday’s Beastrabban article about the forthcoming graphic story collection To End All Wars, I got in touch with top writer Pat Mills, and he told me about a couple more World War One-related comics projects that are likely to have Mr Gove boiling in his propaganda pit.

Above the Dreamless Dead from First Second [publisher] … features graphic adaptions of WW1 poems, including my 10-page adaption with David Hitchcock of Dead Man’s Dump [by Isaac Rosenberg],” Mr Mills told me. “Amazing art!”

You can see some of the art above – albeit only the book’s cover. The other poems are:

All the Hills and Vales Along, by Charles Sorley; adapted by Kevin Huizenga

Ancient History, by Siegfried Sassoon; adapted by Liesbeth De Stercke

At the Time of “The Breaking of the Nations,” by Thomas Hardy; adapted by Anders Nilsen

Break of Day in the Trenches, by Isaac Rosenberg; adapted by Sarah Glidden

Channel Firing, by Thomas Hardy; adapted by Luke Pearson

The Dancers, by Wilfred Wilson Gibson; adapted by Lilli Carre

Dulce et decorum est, Greater Love Hath No Man and Soldier’s Dream, by Wilfred Owen; adapted by George Pratt

The End, by Wilfred Owen; adapted by Danica Novgorodoff

Everyone Sang, by Siegfried Sassoon, and Therefore is the Name of It Called Babel, by Osbert Sitwell; adapted by Isabel Greenberg

The General, by Siegfried Sasson; adapted by Garth Ennis and Phil Winslade

Selections from The Great Push, by Patrick MacGill; adapted by Eddie Campbell

I Don’t Want to Be a Soldier, Sing Me to Sleep Where Bullets Fall and When This Bloody War Is Over; soldiers’ songs adapted by Hunt Emerson

I looked up from my work, by Thomas Hardy; adapted by Kathryn Immonen and Stuart Immonen

The Immortals by Isaac Rosenberg; adapted by Peter Kuper

Lamentations: The Coward, by Rudyard Kipling; adapted by Stephen R. Bissette

Next War, by Osbert Sitwell; adapted by Simon Gane

Peace, by Rupert Brooke; adapted by Simon Gane

A Private, by Edward Thomas, and The Question, by Wilfred Wilson Gibson; adapted by Hannah Berry

Repression of War Experience, by Siegfried Sassoon; adapted by James Lloyd

Two Fusiliers, by Robert Graves; adapted by Carol Tyler

War, by Francis Edward Ledwidge; adapted by Sammy Harkham.

Above the Dreamless Dead will be released on September 23, almost exactly 100 years after the outbreak of the hostilities that inspired its authors. First Second books can be found on the web here.

That’s not all. Pat Mills told me of another project that could leave Mr Gove frothing with jingoistic fury.

The Beast mentioned in his article yesterday that Mr Mills produced, with the late Joe Colquhoun providing the art, what’s been hailed as probably the best British war comic ever: Charley’s War. This meticulously-researched, dedicatedly pacifist story ran from 1979 to 1985 in the British weekly Battle and has now been adapted into a series of collections from Titan Books.

Now, the writer has a new project – “in Charley’s War genre” – entitled Brothers in Arms. Illustrated by his Above the Dreamless Dead collaborator David Hitchcock, the piece is currently in search of a publisher. Let’s hope we don’t have to wait too long for it to find a home.

Comics. They might be fun for kids – but they’ll also teach Michael Gove not to mess with history.

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