Tag Archives: run

U-turn and u-turn again as Boris Johnson first agrees, then refuses to meet bereaved Covid campaigners

Coward: Boris Johnson hid in a fridge once to evade difficult questions. Now he is resorting to flat-out lies.

How galling for the 14 million who voted for him to realise that Boris Johnson is such a craven coward.

He can’t even bear to meet people who have lost family members due to his mistakes – so he has made up a succession of reasons not to.

Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice UK may not have a snappy name but they do have a good reason for existence – they want an inquiry into the Johnson government’s decisions on the Coronavirus pandemic in the UK.

The organisation wisely distrusts Johnson’s claim that he will hold an inquiry “at the appropriate time” and has already issued a “letter before action”, warning that the group is considering litigation to secure an inquiry.

But a letter before action is not itself litigation.

So when Boris Johnson said, “It turns out that this particular group are currently in litigation with the government. I will certainly meet them once that litigation is concluded,” he was lying.

He had previously promised to meet them.

Perhaps he was hoping that most people would not know enough about court action to tell that he was telling a falsehood in order to run away from the potentially disastrous publicity a meeting would create.

It’s also possible that he was hoping his u-turn would not come to public attention.

This Writer is already on the record as saying it is unlikely an inquiry will take place. Politicians like Johnson say there will be one “at the appropriate time” when a crisis is ongoing and people are demanding it but, the instant the trouble is over, they insist that it would be better to put the matter behind us.

Let’s face it: Johnson is notoriously bad – embarrassing, in fact – when he doesn’t have a script to read out. He may be afraid he’ll say something that may be used against him later.

So he’s running away from a meeting he promised to attend.

And that, dear reader, is the act of a coward.

Source: Coronavirus: Campaigners reject PM’s ‘poor excuse’ for not meeting them – BBC News

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Terrified Tories are running from media scrutiny

If the people of Peterborough return a Conservative to Parliament after this display, I would be very surprised.

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Never mind the polls – the Tories are terrified and Boris Johnson is running away from scrutiny

Frit: I don’t think Boris Johnson is really so terrified his hair is standing on end, but he is definitely running away from public scrutiny. What a miserable coward.

While the Tory-loving media have been touting an out-of-date poll suggesting a 68-seat Conservative Parliamentary majority, the actions of the party tells a different story.

Boris Johnson has run like a scalded cat from the possibility of being interviewed by Andrew Neil, after the veteran reporter seemed to prefer the sound of his own voice to any answers Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn might have given, in an interview earlier this week.

It seems the cowardly Johnson is afraid that he may face questioning over his own sexism, racism and attempts to spread Islamophobia, the many lies he has told – including to the Queen, and perhaps about his alleged financial connections with Russian money and with hedge fund bosses who apparently supported his bid to become Tory leader in return for a “no deal” Brexit.

He will also snub Channel 4’s election leaders debate on the climate crisis today (November 28) – and he will not attend the BBC’s seven-way leader debate tomorrow (November 29). Mr Corbyn will also be absent.

Mr Johnson’s place will be taken by Chief Secretary to the Treasury Rishi Sunak. Who? This Writer had been led to believe Dominic Raab would be there.

But Mr Raab has his own questions to answer after the family of Harry Dunn were excluded from a constituency hustings.

Mr Dunn was killed in a car crash in August, over which the suspected culprit claimed diplomatic immunity – and was granted it by Mr Raab.

So he’s running scared too!

Mr Corbyn’s place will be taken by Rebecca Long-Bailey, who doesn’t have any cloud hanging over her head as far as we can tell.

On the Andrew Neil interview, a Tory source apparently said discussions are ongoing, while Labour chairman Ian Lavery, more believably, said: “He’s running scared because every time he is confronted with the impact of nine years of austerity, the cost of living crisis, and over his plans to sell out our NHS, the more he is exposed.”

Meanwhile, Tory campaigning has shifted from attacking Labour to defending their own vulnerable seats, indicating that they are spooked by poll results and are switching their seat-winning ambitions away from all but a few Leave-heavy Labour marginals.

The best analysis so far seems to come from a Twitter account run by someone calling themselves “Dr Moderate”. See for yourself:

So there you have it.

Support for Labour is increasing day by day and Tory attempts to stop it have failed.

But the Tory-supporting media, including the BBC, are telling you the opposite at a time when the law says they must be impartial.

Source: Boris Johnson ‘running scared’ from Andrew Neil grilling as Prime Minister misses two TV debates – Birmingham Live

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Graphic proof that Theresa May causes the problems she blames on Labour

Mad-eyed May: The Maybot is clearly malfunctioning and should be packed back in her box.

Remember this, from Friday:

One of the perils of electing Labour, according to Mrs May in her pretty little speech, is a run on the pound – a drop in its value caused by the actions of the government. This Writer mentioned in my previous article that Mrs May was prone to causing such calamities herself, whenever she gives a speech on Brexit.

Here’s visual evidence of it:


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Has right-wing party’s treasurer run off with the leader’s mum – and all the cash?

161118-britain-first-shocker

Right-wing politics is all about the money, but this story takes it to extremes.

Apparently the Treasurer of Britain First has run off with the leader’s mother – taking all the party’s money with them.

The interesting question here is: How do the rest of us respond to something like that?

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Perhaps the Tories have all caught ‘foot in mouth’ disease

Shapps v BBC: Take a look at the name on his tag and ask yourself who you think is more trustworthy.

The face is Grant Shapps but the name tag says ‘Michael Green’! Clearly they allow strange business practices in the Conservative Party.

The disasters are coming thick and fast for the Conservative Party.

Commenting on Labour’s announcement of policies intended to boost small and large businesses, Tory Party co-chairman Grant Shapps told BBC News that Ed Miliband could not run the economy because he’d never run a business in his life.

Commenter Roy Saunders suggested to the BBC News website: “Perhaps Mr Shapps could take a moment to tell the British public about all the business experience that George Osborne has?”

Yes indeed; towel-folding in a posh department store must have set him up well for a career as Chancellor of the Exchequer.

Mind you, Shapps can’t talk. He does have actual business experience – but not under his own name.

Was it ‘Michael Green’, Mr Shapps? Or ‘Sebastian Fox’?

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Food bank debate shows yet again the government’s argument has no substance

131219foodbanks

By now, we should all know how these Opposition Day debates go – but Wednesday’s discussion of food banks was one of the best examples I’ve heard.

The form goes like this: The relevant Labour shadow minister launches the debate, quoting the facts that support the argument (in this case, that the rise of food banks is a national disgrace and the Conservative-Liberal Democrat government’s policies have caused it), the government denies the charge – always with the same feeble excuses, backbenchers queue up to tell their own damning stories of what has happened to their constituents… and then the government wins the vote because its members have been whipped to vote against the motion, rather than because they believe it is wrong.

The food bank debate was textbook. Not only did it carry all these features, but:

  • The Secretary of State responsible, Iain Duncan Smith, declined to speak at all, but turned tail and ran after listening to only a small number of speakers.
  • Minister of State Esther McVey, who spoke in his place, delivered what Labour veteran Gerald Kaufman described as “one of the nastiest frontbench speeches I’ve heard in more than 43 years”.
  • As one story of government-created hardship followed another, Conservative MPs laughed. Clearly they are enjoying the suffering they are causing across the UK.

Each of these is a damning indictment of the depths to which the Coalition has driven British politics. But the debate is only half of this matter. Now it is our duty to publicise what happened. Many people may not know about this, or may not understand its significance.

They need to understand that food bank use has risen exponentially under David Cameron’s Conservative-led government, from 41,000 people in 2010 to half a million by April this year, one-third of whom were children. People are resorting to them because the cost of living is rising while wages have stagnated and social security benefit payments have been delayed or slashed. The government promised to publish a study on food banks in the summer of this year, but has delayed publication with no stated reason. The government department responsible – DEFRA – did not even put up a minister to speak in the debate.

Probably the most damning indictment was the vote. The Coalition government defeated a motion to bring forward measures that would reduce dependency on food banks. The obvious conclusion is that this government is happy to be pushing ordinary working and jobless people into crushing poverty – and intends to continue putting more and more people in the same situation for just as long as it possibly can.

We heard that:

  • People in Slough are fighting each other over discount fruit and vegetables in the local Tesco.
  • Food banks are visited by skilled workers who are unable to get jobs because of Coalition government policies.
  • Serious failures including administrative error in the benefit system mean one-fifth of the people visiting food banks are there because the Department for Work and Pensions has been unable to do its job properly.
  • The Bedroom Tax has hugely increased the number of people using food banks.
  • “The working poor are emerging as the Prime Minister’s legacy, as millions of people live in quiet crisis.” (Labour’s Jamie Reed).

In response, the Tories trotted out the old, old arguments, trying yet again to sell us the long-disproved claim that Labour forced the country into poverty by mismanaging the national finances. We heard, again, the turncoat Lord Freud’s claim that people were visiting food banks because the items there were free (ignoring the fact that everyone who visits a food bank is referred by a qualified organisation, and verified as being in crisis). We heard, again, the suggestion from our ignorant Education Secretary Michael Gove, that people are turning to food banks because they cannot manage their own finances (good management makes no difference if costs outweigh income; but then he clearly hasn’t been educated well enough to understand that).

Esther McVey’s speech showed clearly why she should have remained on breakfast television, where comparatively few people had to put up with her. She accused the previous Labour government of a “whirl of living beyond our means” that “had to come to a stop” without ever pausing to admit that it was Tory-voting bankers who had been living beyond their means, who caused the crash, and who are still living beyond their means today, because her corporatist (thank you, Zac Goldsmith) Conservative government has protected them.

She accused Labour of trying to keep food banks as “its little secret”, forcing Labour’s Jim Cunningham to remind us all that food banks were set up by churches to help refugees who were waiting for their asylum status to be confirmed – not as a support system for British citizens, as they have become under the Coalition’s failed regime.

She said the Coalition government was brought in to “solve the mess that Labour got us in”, which is not true – it was born from a backroom deal between two of the most unscrupulous party leaders of recent times, in order to ensure they and their friends could get their noses into the money trough (oh yes, there’s plenty of money around – but this government is keeping it away from you).

She said the Coalition had got more people into work than ever before – without commenting on the fact that the jobs are part-time, zero-hours, self-employed contracts that benefit the employers but exploit the workers and in fact propel them towards poverty.

She lied to Parliament, claiming that children are three times more likely to be in poverty if they are in a workless household. In fact, according to the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, in-work poverty has now outstripped that suffered by those in workless and retired households; children are more likely to be in poverty if their parents have jobs.

She attacked Labour for allowing five million people to be on out-of-work benefits, with two million children in workless households – but under her government the number of households suffering in-work poverty has risen to eight million (by 2008 standards), while workless or retired households in poverty have risen to total 6.3 million.

She claimed that 60,000 people were likely to use a food bank this year – but Labour’s Paul Murphy pointed out that 60,000 people will use food banks this year in Wales alone. The actual figure for the whole of the UK is 500,000.

She said the government had brought in Universal Credit to ensure that three million people become better-off. There’s just one problem with that system – it doesn’t work.

She said the Coalition’s tax cuts had given people an extra £700 per year, without recognising that the real-terms drop in wages and rise in the cost of living means people will be £1,600 a year worse-off when the next general election takes place, tax cuts included. She said stopping fuel price increases meant families were £300 better-off, which is nonsense. Families cannot become better off because something has not happened; it’s like saying I’m better off because the roof of my house hasn’t fallen in and squashed me.

Then, on top of all that, she had the nerve to tell the country, “Rewriting history doesn’t work.” If that is the case, then hers was one of the most pointless speeches in the history of Parliament.

Labour’s Jamie Reed had the best comment on the debate. He said: “The final verdict on any Government is based on how they treat the poorest in society during the hardest of times,” after pointing out that “the laughter from some of those on the Government benches … says more than words ever could.”

On a personal note, my own MP, Roger Williams, spoke about the food bank situation in Brecon and Radnorshire. It is gratifying that he is proud of the food bank set up by New Life Church, here in Llandrindod Wells – I well remember the telephone conversation I had with the organisers, in which I encouraged them to set it up. I am glad they took up the baton – and that he has appreciated their work.

Rather more worrying is the suggestion that he considers a possible new food bank in Brecon to be only the second in our constituency. There are food banks in many other towns, including Knighton, Ystradgynlais and Hay-on-Wye – with satellite facilities in smaller towns and villages. It is disturbing that the MP does not seem to know this.

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