Tag Archives: secondary legislation

David Cameron faces Tory rebellion over move to curb power of House of Lords

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David Cameron is making himself look increasingly stupid over his pig-headed (and This Writer uses the expression advisedly) determination to create a Tory dictatorship in the UK.

When he is already making himself look increasingly stupid over his silly pose against immigration from other EU countries, his assault on the Lords is very poorly-timed.

Note that the spokesman for rebelling Conservatives is David Davis, who stood against Cameron as a candidate to be leader of the Conservatives in 2005. Davis self-confesses as a very strong supporter of civil liberties, in stark contrast to Cameron’s approach – which is to shut them down at every opportunity.

Perhaps Mr Davis is preparing for another leadership campaign. He’s a member of the Tory right-wing, which means he’s no more desirable than any of the others – but the man who won the most votes in the first round of the last leadership race could certainly complicate the careers of pretenders like Osborne and Johnson.

David Cameron is facing a Conservative rebellion over moves to curb the power of the House of Lords.

Under proposals by the former Tory Cabinet minister Lord Strathclyde, new regulations would be passed to ensure MPs had the “final say” over secondary legislation. The issue came to a head in October, when peers blocked Chancellor George Osborne’s plans to cut spending on tax credits by £4.4bn. In response, Mr Cameron appointed Lord Strathclyde to review the powers of the Upper Chamber.

David Davis, the former minister, told the New Statesman that “at least a dozen” Tory MPs would oppose ending the veto. Downing Street said it would respond in the new year.

The Leader of the Lords, Baroness Stowell of Beeston, described its recommendations as “thoughtful and measured”. But Baroness Smith of Basildon, Labour’s leader in the Lords, argued: “All this paints a very unattractive picture of a Prime Minister and a government that will not tolerate challenge, that loathes scrutiny and fears questioning.”

Under the proposals, peers would be able to “invite the Commons to think again” over secondary legislation, changes implemented outside an Act of Parliament. But the Lords could then be overruled by a vote in the Commons.

Source: David Cameron faces Tory rebellion over move to curb power of House of Lords | UK Politics | News | The Independent

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Attack on Lords is latest stage in the Tory war against democracy


Never mind that the Lords were right to block the stupid and unnecessary Tory cuts to tax credits – they dared to defy David Cameron and George Osborne, so they must pay the price, it seems.

So a review of the Lords’ powers is to say peers should lose their absolute veto over secondary legislation like statutory instruments.

You’ll note that we already know what the “review” will say. Clearly it is not an impartial review of the Lords’ powers and the reasons for having them; the word “review” is in fact a euphemism for a dictat from Cameron.

It should be blocked; it represents another step towards the ‘One-Party Nation’ that the Tories want to create, in which every slightest whim that passes through their tiny brains is inflicted on the public full-force.

The question is, in the land of Apathy, can anybody be bothered to stand up to these monsters?

David Cameron is preparing to use the full force of the law to clip the wings of the House of Lords after it blocked his welfare cuts, the BBC has learned.

A review will say peers should lose their absolute veto over detailed laws known as secondary legislation.

Peers will instead be offered a new power to send these laws back to the Commons, forcing MPs to vote again – but will only be able to do this once.

The review was ordered after peers voted to delay tax credit cuts.

Labour said the reform was a “massive over-reaction” to the government defeat.

Source: Lords veto powers ‘to be curtailed’ – BBC News

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