Tag Archives: Shoah

‘Mainstream’ bid to take back initiative from anti- Witch-hunt campaigners – with lies – may be anti-Semitic

How kind of Steve Walker at Skwawkbox to read the Jewish Chronicle – it means the rest of us don’t have to check that hack-rag for its latest nonsense.

His latest article concerns a desperate – and rather pitiful – attempt to discredit the letter by 12 Holocaust survivors, published by The Sunday Times, supporting Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour Party against allegations that it is anti-Semitic.

The claim is that one of the signatories cannot be a Holocaust survivor because they left Nazi Germany in 1939, aged two.

But the current definition of a Holocaust survivor (more accurately, a Shoah survivor, in the case of Jewish people), held by Yad Vashem, is any Jew who lived for any amount of time under Nazi domination and survived.

This includes people who left Germany during the 1930s.

It is clear that the definition must include Jews who lived in Nazi Germany during the 1930s.

Readers with long memories will remember the huge controversy in 2016 when Ken Livingstone mentioned the Haavara agreement between the German Federation of Zionists and the Nazi Government of the early 1930s.

There was only one reason the German Zionists sought that agreement – fear of persecution by the Nazi government.

It facilitated the escape of around 60,000 people from Germany to what was then British Mandate Palestine – and they are all Holocaust survivors as well.

In fact, the JC piece may itself be described as anti-Semitic. The IHRA working definition of anti-Semitism includes among its examples “denying the fact, scope, mechanisms… or intentionality of… the Holocaust”, and the accusation in this piece certainly does so.

The JC article also suggests some of the signatories of the letter in The Sunday Times didn’t know what they were signing, but in fact they not only understood it perfectly well, but some of them also suggested amendments to the letter.

What a weak response from people who have trumpeted their righteousness for years! And what will they try next?


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Uncomfortable facts that should be addressed – not just on Holocaust Memorial Day but every day

A woman and a man at the memorial plaque at Buchenwald concentration camp near Weimar, Germany [Image: Jens Schlueter/Getty Images].

Here‘s a worthwhile article on the Beastrabban blog, making an important point about the way the scope of Holocaust Memorial Day seems to have been limited.

Today is, I believe, Holocaust Remembrance Day, when the world, or at least the Western world, reflects on the Shoah and the calculated extermination of six million Jews.

As we commemorate the sufferings of the Jews during the Nazi regime, we also need to take on board that it isn’t just about anti-Semitism, but about similar horrors that have disfigured human history down the centuries, and murderous, criminal regimes that are perpetrating them today.

Just so. The Nazi Holocaust, the killing of millions of Jews, and the way in which they were murdered, should never be forgotten. But part of this remembrance must involve recognition that similar hate-motivated atrocities can happen – and are happening – even now.

Unfortunately, there are some highly vocal people who seem to want to mask this fact, as we have seen on This Site over the last few days.

Holocaust Remembrance Day isn’t just about commemorating the Holocaust and its victims, but other genocides and their victims that have occurred throughout history. Hitler partly made his decision to go ahead with the extermination of the Jews because of the complete lack of western reaction to the Young Turks’ massacre of the Armenians. He commented, ‘Who remembers the Armenians?’ And before then, the German colonial authorities in what is now Tanganyika had attempted to exterminate the Herrero after they revolted, using similar eugenicist logic.

It is … important to remember the other victims of the Nazi camps as well.

This included the congenitally disabled, who were murdered by Nazi doctors under the Aktion T4 programme with the assistance and supervision of the SS… This prefigured and prepared for the murder of the Jews, particularly in the use of poison gas.

I made the point that disabled people are being persecuted to their deaths by the Conservative government in the United Kingdom – right now – in a response to comments in Prime Minister’s Questions on Wednesday (January 24).

And what initial response did I receive?

Denial. And denial is one of the ten stages of genocide, as we all know from the Holocaust Memorial Day website. Right?

The Nazis also attempted to exterminate the Romanies – the Gypsies – as they too were considered, like the Jews, to be subhuman and a threat to German society and racial industry.

Other victims of the camps included the mentally ill, neurotics, prostitutes, recidivist criminals, Prisoners of War, and political prisoners, such as trade unionists, Socialists, Communists, Anarchists, gay men, and slave workers from the Slav nations. The last were worked to death in horrific conditions, including building the Nazi fortifications and tunnels in the Channel Islands.

The Holocaust Memorial Day website devotes a couple of paragraphs on a page to these victims of the Nazi Holocaust. The highest estimate of the death figures shows they outnumber Jewish victims by a ratio of nearly two to one.

The website also devotes several pages each to the genocides in Cambodia, Darfur, Bosnia and Rwanda, and mentions the atrocities against Armenians which encouraged Hitler to commit his own.

It omits many other genocides, both recent and historical.

Nothing is said about the indigenous people of America, for example. Those of you who are aware of the HMD website may not even know there is a site for Aztec Natives, which makes the following pertinent point:

“The Mexican people are the descendants and the end product of five centuries of genocide – the greatest Holocaust in human history. Over 100 million of our ancestors, i.e. at least 90% of natives were killed.”

100 million dead, and no commemoration on Holocaust Memorial Day. It seems some groups have stronger public relations people than others.

Genocides have continued to be perpetrated, such as the various crimes against humanity committed by Fascist regimes across Latin America, Asia and Africa, supported by American foreign policy. The persecution of the Rohingya is just the latest of these.

Isn’t it interesting how we can identify the wrongdoings of people in other countries, yet we say nothing about what’s happening in our own? “It couldn’t happen here”, as the saying goes.

It has; it does; it is.

Those who deny it are complicit.

Fortunately, the Beastrabban piece provides a ray of hope. We see that not everybody supports the overwhelming concentration of attention on the Nazi Holocaust, and it is important to note that Jewish scholars are among those leading the way in this regard.

And Jews have been involved in protesting and commemorating them and their victims as well. In Canada, the leader of the mainstream Jewish organisation, Bernie Farber, organised a ‘Shabbat for Darfur’ after that city was attacked by the Islamist Janjaweed Militia in the early part of this century. Farber’s generous action has been bitterly criticised by members of the transatlantic conservative Right, who feel that Jews should concentrate solely on their own sufferings in the Holocaust, and not expand their experience of suffering, persecution and attempted genocide to form solidarity with the other persecuted ethnic and religious groups.

Why not form solidarity with other persecuted groups? We all know there is strength in numbers. Is it because making such connections might reveal uncomfortable truths about events closer to home?

Israeli scholars have also noted that the Holocaust, while horrific, was not a unique event. See Genocide: A Critical Bibliographic Review, edited by Israel W. Charny, the executive director of the Institute on the Holocaust, Jerusalem, and Director of Postgraduate Interdisplinary and Graduate Social Work Programs in Family, Therapy, Bob Shapell School of Social Work, Tel Aviv University. Dr. Charny’s book also includes a chapter on the ethnic cleansing of Israel’s indigenous Arab population, which is definitely unwelcome to the Likudniks.

But it bears out Ilan Pappe’s assertion that Israelis are still decent people, who need to have the situation and issues properly explained to them. But odiously, Netanyahu, Likud and other ethno-nationalists in his ruling coalition are doing all they can to prevent that occurring. As are his little helpers over here in the shape of the Jewish Labour Movement and the Campaign Against Anti-Semitism.

Food for thought, I hope. But I wonder if critics of This Site and This Writer will be able to forgive me for including more groups in my own commemoration of Holocaust Memorial Day than they do.

Source: Wishing Everyone a Solemn and Reflective Holocaust Remembrance Day | Beastrabban\’s Weblog


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Anti-Semitism debate: Michael Rosen on Israel’s ‘right to exist’

Theodor Herzl: The founder of modern Zionism planned the ethnic cleansing of what is now Israel - removing Palestinians from their land in order to replace them with Jews. How can that ever be supportable?

Theodor Herzl: The founder of modern Zionism planned the ethnic cleansing of what is now Israel – removing Palestinians from their land in order to replace them with Jews. How can that ever be supportable?

Does Israel have a right to exist, as many Zionists have claimed – stridently, whilst demanding that anybody who argues otherwise is an anti-Semite?

It’s an interesting question – and the alleged anti-Semitism being hung around its metaphorical neck makes it worthy of discussion. Here‘s Michael Rosen’s view – and he makes some excellent points.

Is he an anti-Semite (or, considering his heritage, a “self-hating Jew”)? Of course not. He’s a rational, thinking human being.

So consider his arguments and – when faced with opposing points of view – ask of their proponents are as rational as him.

‘Israel’s right to exist’ is not based on internationally recognised law. Nations do not have the ‘right to exist’: people seize them, create them, construct them, and defend them – usually with armaments. There is no abstract ‘right to exist’. Or if people think there is, let it be stated. I think many native peoples would be delighted to hear of it, including the Palestinians.

When or if Israel’s ‘right to exist’ is made ‘non-negotiable’, this makes the Palestinians’ right of return non-negotiable. If we say that any discussion or doubt about Israel’s right to exist is anti-Semitic or ‘hors du combat’ , or not up for debate, then in so doing we accord Israel its right to have founded a nation based on dispossession, and that it is entitled to claim continued dispossession. In fact, Israel demands that all peace negotiations begin with acceptance of its ‘right to exist’. Rather than this demand being described as unacceptable, and that this demand has at its heart at the very least some racist overtones towards the dispossessed, the situation is reversed and it is those who question this, who are told that we are the racists.

The main justification for this demand seems to be that the holocaust (genocide of European Jews) took place. This justification is not a universal rule or law. There has been the attempted genocide of the native people’s of Australia and north America. The ‘best’ that either of these peoples got from the conquerors and/or the international community in terms of land were ‘reservations’. They are not accorded any status in terms of a ‘right to exist’ as nations.

To be clear, it is quite possible for what I am saying here to be part of an antisemitic line of thought ie that it is part of a viewpoint which hates all Jews because they are Jews. What I am talking about here is to do with founding principles of nation states, and people’s rights.

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