Tag Archives: substance

Liar Johnson won’t take the knee, saying he doesn’t do ‘gesture’ politics. When has he done anything else?

Boris Johnson: this two-fingered salute isn’t just his message to Black Lives Matter – it’s his attitude to black people everywhere.

[This is one of three connected articles. This Site is also examining the responses of Keir Starmer and Dr David Starkey to Black Lives Matter; none of them come out smelling of roses.]

What a bizarre thing for Boris Johnson to say! Is he testing our credulity?

Here’s the story:

Boris Johnson has said he would not take the knee, a symbol of support for Black Lives Matter protests, saying he does not believe in “gestures.”

Speaking on LBC on Friday morning, the prime minister said, “I do not believe in gestures, I believe in substance.”

This came a month after Dominic Raab, the foreign secretary, said he would not take the knee in support of the BLM movement, arguing that protest is “a matter of personal choice”.

That’s right – and the personal choice in the case of Conservatives appears to be racism.

Here’s the clip of him saying it:

Johnson’s decision not to have anything to do with Black Lives Matter seems to have more to do with his own personal prejudice against anybody whose skin colour isn’t the same as his than anything else – in line with his previous choices not to shake hands with any black people at Conservative party conference, and his references to them as “piccaninnies” with “watermelon smiles”.

It’s a dog-whistle for racists across the UK as well: “Support me and I’ll look after your interests. Look – I’ve already killed lots of black people with Covid-19 and I’ll find other ways to persecute them later.”

It’s sad that Opposition leader Keir Starmer is proving himself to be just as sickening a racist as this disgrace to humanity.

As for the claim that he doesn’t believe in gestures – Boris Johnson’s entire political career is filled with gestures that were almost entirely devoid of substance. Let’s think of a few…

Ah! here’s one:

The claim on the side of the so-called Brexit bus was a lie, of course; if Johnson had given £350 million a week to the NHS, then the UK would have been far better-prepared to tackle Covid-19.

In fact, what he did is much, much worse than that:

For crying out loud! His Tories were fanfaring a gesture as he was saying he didn’t believe in them! See:

Members of the public have come up with many more from recent history. Which is your favourite?

This is excellent:

It all boils down to this:

Now compare Johnson’s behaviour with that of David Starkey and Keir Starmer.

Starkey’s publisher and employers terminated their arrangements with him on hearing his racist words, uttered on a right-wing YouTube channel.

Starmer had to beg black and minority ethnic Labour Party members not to leave after he displayed his own ignorance of Black Lives Matter, and racism in having treated it as nothing more than a photo opportunity.

But Johnson is in a much more secure position than either of them. He is the prime minister – nobody can fire him – and he has an unassailable 80-seat majority in the House of Commons.

He knows he can do whatever he wants.

Sure, public opinion is important – but he thinks the majority of the UK electorate is gullible in the extreme, so all he has to do is lie until his tongue turns the same colour as his politics, and all will be well.

There will be people reading this article who will still support Johnson, his blatant gesture politics and his dog-whistle racism. I look forward to laughing at their freakish justifications in the “comment” column.

It will be my only source of amusement. Johnson’s comment is an insulting gesture to all of us: it doesn’t matter what we think, he can say – and do – anything he likes.

Have YOU donated to my crowdfunding appeal, raising funds to fight false libel claims by TV celebrities who should know better? These court cases cost a lot of money so every penny will help ensure that wealth doesn’t beat justice.

https://www.crowdjustice.com/case/mike-sivier-libel-fight/


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Drug-induced? Conservative policy is to increase the national debt and make you pay

131121osborne

Isn’t it shameful that the Conservatives are attacking Labour because the Co-op Bank chief has been behaving like the Chancellor of the Exchequer?

The ex-chairman of the bank, Paul Flowers – who is a former Labour councillor, is being investigated by police after he was filmed appearing to buy drugs. How is that different from the above photograph of one G. Osborne (now Chancellor of the Exchequer), raving it up at a party with a lot of cocaine on the table (ringed in red)?

Comedy Prime Minister David Cameron made much of the Flowers investigation at Prime Minister’s Questions – even suggesting, after the unimpeachable Michael Meacher asked an important question about business investment, that the honourable gentleman might have “been on a night out on the town with Reverend Flowers” and the “mind-altering substances have taken effect”.

Apparently it is all right for Gideon to be a drug casualty because he is a Tory; only Labour supporters who take drugs can be bad in Cameron’s addled world.

No wonder Labour MPs chanted “Shame!” at Cameron as he slunk out of the Chamber.

His attitude seems wrong-headed because, as managed by Mr Osborne for the past three and a half years, the economy can only be regarded as improving if one has the aid of Mr Cameron’s “mind-altering substances”.

Economic figures released this week are being touted as good news, with tax revenues “boosted” by “a recovering economy and housing market”, according to the BBC.

Take a closer look at those figures and they fall down. Borrowing (excluding the cost of interventions like bank bailouts, so we’re already in the realm of made-up figures) fell by two one-hundred-and-thirds, from £8.24 billion in the same month last year to £8.08 billion in October. Less than two per cent and they’re calling it a “boost”. It might be wiped out again in November’s figures.

Also, it should be borne in mind that growth in the housing market is due to the bubble created by our formerly-substance-abusing Chancellor, while any other economic growth has nothing to do with him and, in any case, does not help the vast majority of the population.

Total public debt has risen again, to £1.207 trillion or 75.4 per cent of gross domestic product – the highest it has ever been – under the Conservatives.

The aim for the national deficit, we are told, is to keep borrowing for 2013-14 at £120 billion or below. In his ‘Emergency Budget’ of 2010, Osborne predicted that borrowing this year would be down to half that – at £60 billion, and estimates have been rising ever since.

The 2011 budget had the 2013-14 deficit at £70 billion; in 2012 it was expected to be £98 billion; and now – £120 billion. Perhaps his original estimate was a coke-fuelled fantasy?

Of course – as this blog repeated only days ago – the Conservative-led Coalition never intended to cut the national debt. This was just a claim ministers made while they changed the system to take as much money as possible from the poor while making it possible for the rich to remove their personal earnings and corporate profits from tax to the greatest extent possible.

Result: Increasing debt and lower-than-necessary tax returns, making it possible for the Tories to claim they must cut public services and the benefit system, while laughing all the way to the banks (the ones that were never penalised for burning all our money in the first place).

So much for “We’re all in it together” – unless that was another reference to “mind-altering substances”, and we didn’t understand it until now.