Tag Archives: Guardian

Hostilities recommence over alleged #Labourantisemitism ahead of EHRC report

After a relatively quiet summer when we all had other things on our mind, it seems the controversy over alleged anti-Semitism in the Labour Party is about to well up all over again.

Hostilities have resumed ahead of publication of the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s report on alleged institutional anti-Semitism in the party under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership.

According to The Guardian,

Senior Labour figures are braced for the equalities watchdog to rule that the party acted unlawfully in its treatment of Jewish members.

Sources close to the inquiry said an earlier draft report found evidence of indirect discrimination in the operation of the party’s processes, which would be a breach of equalities law.

A draft report is known to have been shared with the Labour party in July, as well as with a small number of key figures from the Corbyn administration.

There are understood to have been multiple challenges to the draft report and the EHRC’s final conclusions have been kept under wraps.

[Current Labour leader Keir] Starmer is likely to accept all of the report’s recommendations, though a legal challenge to the EHRC’s findings is planned by Jewish supporters of Corbyn if they disagree with its conclusions.

But we should all bear in mind that the anti-Corbyn Graun is widely considered to have played a large part in stirring up the scandal in a bid to see him forced out of the Labour leadership.

As an example of the hostilities that are breaking out, consider the last paragraph quoted above, saying that Jewish supporters of Jeremy Corbyn will launch a legal challenge to the EHRC’s findings if they disagree, and then consider this (with apologies for subjecting you to some vile language):

As you can see, the insults are already flying without a scrap of evidence one way or another.

Source: Labour braces for damning ruling in EHRC antisemitism report | Politics | The Guardian

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Labour goons are trying to get lefties to buckle under to Starmer. Did they miss the last five years?

Keir Starmer: he’s not interested in accommodating left-wingers in Labour; he just wants them to shut up and do as they’re told.

It must be a kind of psychosis. Former Corbyn adviser Andrew Fisher’s outburst in The Guardian is just a symptom.

After spending five years refusing point-blank to accept Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership of the Labour Party and follow the new (which was actually a traditional) Labour Party line, these creeps – and their buddie in the media (Graun) – are trying to get lefties to slavishly follow Starmer:

Labour’s left must work constructively with Keir Starmer and resist the temptation to go “back in our sealed tomb”, Jeremy Corbyn’s former policy chief has warned.

Notice the choice of language. Nobody on the left suggested the uptight right-wingers belonged in a “sealed tomb” (although let’s be honest, a fascist rally would be more appropriate).

He said it was the responsibility of senior figures within the party’s left to reassure new members that Corbyn’s replacement would not lead to their marginalisation.

That would be irresponsible because we have already seen leading left-wing figures marginalised (Rebecca Long-Bailey, for example).

Fisher said Starmer’s 10 leadership election pledges, which included commitments on abolishing tuition fees, taxing the wealthy and public ownership, was “still basically our policy programme”.

Not true – Starmer has already reneged on nine out of the 10.

So I don’t believe Fisher, and I don’t think anybody else should either.

The opportunity for the different sides of “broad church” Labour to come together was under the left-wing leadership of Jeremy Corbyn.

It can’t happen under right-wingers like Keir Starmer because their attitude is as described in this article’s headline: buckle under or bugger off.

They’re not interested in devising a policy platform that is acceptable to traditional Labour supporters – and good for the country as a whole.

They just want to use rank-and-file Labour subscriptions to line their own pockets. In This Writer’s opinion.

Source: Labour left must work with Starmer or risk ‘return to tomb’, says Corbyn adviser | Politics | The Guardian

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Vox Political writer mentioned in Graun piece on anti-Semitism – where’s my right of reply?

Keir Starmer: he’s clueless about anti-Semitism, as this latest debacle demonstrates.

This is pathetic from the Guardian – and the Labour Party.

It seems a councillor in Brighton and Hove has been suspended by the Labour Party for sharing Facebook posts “promoting alleged anti-Jewish conspiracy theories” – including one on This Site.

The article states:

Labour’s inquiry will also focus on a second post from August 2018 on a website run by Mike Sivier, who was expelled from Labour in the same year after he allegedly refused to undertake antisemitism training.

The headline of that post said: “Jewish Israeli journalist claims pro-Israel propagandists have ‘taken out contract’ to stop Jeremy Corbyn being elected.”

I was not contacted for comment on this, despite the fact that it clearly concerns me and implies that I have been spreading anti-Semitism.

The article – if either of the reporters on this piece (Henry McDonald and Jessica Elgot) had bothered to visit it – quotes the highly-respected award-winning (and occasionally controversial) Jewish journalist Gideon Levy, demonstrating that former Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn had support among Jews at a time when many – including high-profile members of the Labour Party itself – were claiming he was an anti-Semite.

As Mr Levy is himself Jewish, it could be argued that attacks on his article – or mine that quotes it – are themselves anti-Semitic, by alleging anti-Jewish behaviour by someone who is himself a Jew.

Regarding my own circumstances, regular readers will know it is true that I was expelled from Labour in November 2013, but not because I refused to undertake anti-Semitism training.

The expulsion was based on false accusations by people who had selectively quoted from my articles in order to present a false impression of my views.

There was a hearing involving a tribunal of Labour’s National Constitutional Committee that was nothing short of a kangaroo court; my own evidence was ignored and it was clear to me that the tribunal members had made up their minds before even arriving at the hearing.

I have therefore launched a legal action against the Labour Party – for breach of contract – with the case to be heard at Bristol Civil Justice Centre on October 2.

Guardian reporters are certainly invited to attend, where I expect to win my case.

If I do, it will have a significant impact on perception of the Labour Party’s attitude to allegations of anti-Semitism – and, I hope, to the reporting of this issue in rags like the Graun.

In the meantime, I have contacted The Guardian and expect the newspaper to make an offer of restitution in the near future.

Otherwise it seems I may be forced to consider even more litigation.

Source: Labour suspends Brighton councillor over alleged antisemitism | Politics | The Guardian

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Why is Johnson so popular when he has bungled the coronavirus crisis so badly?


I don’t get it.

A poll out yesterday (April 2) shows that most people believe Boris Johnson and his government have botched their handling of the coronavirus pandemic, endangering lives.

But popularity polls put him and his party at their most popular in years, with more than 50 per cent of people supporting them.

In the name of all that’s decent, why?

And don’t give me the old flannel about the alternative being worse. That’s a false argument; we don’t know that the alternative would be worse and can only judge the situation that we have.

The new poll by Ipsos Mori shows 56 per cent of said the social distancing measures were imposed too late while just four per cent believed they were brought in too soon. A further 35 per cent of respondents said they thought the measures were taken at the right time.

Even so, a majority of those polled said they thought the measures had been effective – while watching death figures increase steadily. This is contradictory; if Johnson brought in the measures too late, then he has endangered lives and they have not been effective.

Other critics are harsher.

“No 10 appears to be enamoured with ‘scientism’ – things that have the cosmetic attributes of science but without its rigour,” wrote Nasim Nicholas Taleb, professor of risk engineering at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering and author of The Black Swan, and Yaneer Bar-Ya, president of the New England Complex System Institute.

“Collective safety and systemic risk are the business of the state. Letting a segment of the population die for the sake of the economy is a false dichotomy – aside from the moral repugnance of the idea.” This is a reference to Dominic Cummings’s favoured ‘herd immunity’ idea that was, in fact, unscientific and would have resulted in the deaths of millions of UK citizens.

“Gambling with the lives of citizens is a professional wrongdoing that extends beyond academic mistake; it is a violation of the ethics of governing,” they concluded.

Foreign commentary has been even more unkind.

“Looking across the Irish Sea I find myself thinking surely now, surely the British can see how they’ve been hoodwinked,” wrote Joe Horgan in the Irish Times [boldings mine].

“Boris Johnson is incompetent in a way that is astonishing even to those of us who thought he was a mere showman charlatan.

“Johnson told you one week to carry on, everything would be fine, and the following week to not step outside the door. For a man so fond of wartime imagery there is one that seems to fit him. An image from WW1 that was used to describe British soldiers in the trenches and the generals that ordered them to their deaths. Lions led by donkeys.”

(Led By Donkeys is, coincidentally – or perhaps not – a UK organisation that ran a billboard campaign highlighting the contradictions of Johnson’s, and other Brexiteers’, words on Brexit.)

“Much like those generals, Johnson’s initial idea of herd immunity seemed willing to sacrifice thousands of you only for him to turn around in the middle of no man’s land and run for cover.

“Of all the European leaders he has looked the most out of his depth, the most shallow, and vacuous. These are dark times and rambling verbal buffoonery looks as essentially useless as it essentially is.”

He concluded that he felt the Irish people had been lucky, and: “I dearly hope you, our neighbours, our friends, and our family, on the other side of the Irish Sea, I dearly hope you get lucky too.” Because luck is all that can save us from Johnson’s disastrous policy blunders.

Perhaps most cutting was the New York Times.

“Boris Johnson has spent decades preparing for his lead role, honing his adopted character, perfecting his mannerisms, gauging the reactions to his performance and adjusting it for maximum effect,” wrote Jenni Russell in that publication.

“Now he has the national stage and the rapt audience he always craved… throughout these last weeks as the coronavirus crisis became apparent to everyone in Britain, Mr. Johnson has been indecisive, contradictory, confused and confusing, jovial when he should be grave, muddled when a frightened nation desperately needs him to be clear.

“The man picked for his supposed talents as a great communicator has stumbled his way through news conferences, occasionally hitting with evident relief upon a jolly riff he finds familiar.

“In the rare moments when he has struck the right note, he unerringly hits a jarring one minutes, hours or days later. His switches of strategy and his lack of clarity left far too many Britons oblivious to the importance of social distancing until far too late.

“As the virus spread into Europe in mid-February, an alert prime minister would have taken immediate charge, turbocharging preparations, aware that a possible pandemic posed a grave danger to Britain. Instead, he vanished from public view for 12 days, most of it spent on a private holiday with his pregnant fiancée at a palatial country house.

“It was only at the end of February, with 80,000 known coronavirus cases worldwide and the World Health Organization on the edge of declaring a pandemic, that Mr. Johnson began to wake up. By that time there were 20 confirmed cases and one death in Britain already — and surely many more coming.

“On Feb. 28, after the FTSE index had suffered its biggest one-week fall since 2008, Mr. Johnson finally said the virus was the country’s top priority. Only not enough of a priority, it turned out, for him to start work on it that weekend. He could have convened an immediate meeting of the government’s top emergency committee, Cobra, but he postponed it to Monday, as if the virus’s unseen and exponential spread would also be taking the weekend off.

“The next week Mr. Johnson announced that “we should all basically just go about our normal daily lives’’ so long as we washed our hands for 20 seconds, several times a day. It was advice he immediately undermined by boasting cheerfully that he was still shaking hands, as he had indeed done at a hospital with several virus patients just days before. He did not recommend stopping.

“Two days later, as Italy and Spain were shutting down, pleading for other countries not to repeat their mistakes, Mr. Johnson was explaining jauntily that one of the options for handling the virus was not to close schools or sporting events but to “take it on the chin, take it all in one go and allow the disease, as it were, to move through the population, without taking as many draconian measures.” The policy, it was later revealed, was to encourage “herd immunity.” That implied some 40 million people getting ill and another 800,000 ending up in intensive care.

“It was instantly apparent to an aghast public that a creaking, underfunded health service with fewer than 5,000 intensive-care beds; an acute shortage of ventilators, masks, suits and gloves; an inadequate testing capacity; and a disease running free would fall apart just as Italy’s had done.”

Was it? His opinion poll ratings seem to suggest otherwise – in defiance of reason.

““Herd immunity” was quietly reversed. Suddenly restrictions started piling on, but sometimes only as recommendations: 14-day isolations, a warning against pubs, restaurants, theaters; a ban on mass gatherings; school closings. Each day brought new shocks as the government ran to catch up. Each day it acted as if taken by surprise by the virus’s spread.

“Mr. Johnson found it impossible to maintain either consistency or seriousness. He delighted in describing cutting peak death rates as “squashing the sombrero” and declared with verve that we would soon “send coronavirus packing.” He has veered among solemnity, evident boredom and grins, as if his virus briefings were the Boris Johnson Entertainment Show, not the grimmest of necessary broadcasts.

“He said the elderly must be protected from contact, then declared he hoped to visit his mother. Desperate doctors and nurses were warning of imminent disaster, and some of his cabinet were in revolt at his failure to grip the crisis, risk his jolly image and order Britain closed. On Monday, finally, he had to announce that Britain’s lockdown had begun.

“Even then, at this time of profound national fear and disorientation, Mr. Johnson could not speak with gravitas, only with the odd, stagy emphasis of a man pretending while half his mind is elsewhere. His whole political appeal has always rested on his capacity for artful ambiguity, for never necessarily meaning anything he says, for amusing and uplifting people, for avoiding hard facts. It’s what he knows, but not what we need.”

(Apologies to the NYTimes for quoting so much of the article but the facts it contains, and the conclusions it draws, should be drawn to the attention of the UK’s population.)

Given all of these criticisms, it is perhaps unsurprising that Mr Johnson has decided that discretion is the better part of cowardice and is remaining in retreat from the public.

Apparently he still has coronavirus symptoms and is therefore continuing his self-isolation.

Some of us are sceptical, including This Site’s old friend Samuel Miller.

He said Johnson “may stay inside a fridge” – referring to the incident in which our great and illustrious prime minister hid inside a refrigerator to escape having to answer difficult questions.

That’s Boris Johnson for you. That’s the prime minister we elected. A man who spouts nonsense at us and then runs away and hides.

And the people, we’re told, love him for this genocidal stupidity.

In the name of all that’s decent, why?

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Windrush victims may be unhappy but Philip Rutnam was right to quit over MP bullying

Sir Philip Rutnam: he was contractually obliged to carry out the orders of the Tory government; he didn’t make those orders.

The Guardian has published a comment piece criticising Sir Philip Rutnam for his decision to quit as permanent secretary – de facto boss of civil servants – at the Home Office over bullying by Priti Patel.

Columnist Amelia Gentleman reports that some consider it offensive that, by contrast, he could preside over – for example – the “hostile environment” that led to the Windrush Scandal with no concerns.

The criticism is understandable, but wide of the mark because of one fundamental point:

Civil servants put into effect the decisions of Parliament. They do not have a say in those decisions.

So Sir Philip had to enact the policies of David Cameron, Theresa May and Boris Johnson that created the “hostile environment”, Windrush and all the other scandals because, as a civil servant, he had no choice.

Ms Gentleman suggests that he should have spoken up to get the Tories to change the harsh – racist, in my opinion – policies that they were ordering him to carry out. But who says he didn’t?

That would have been a private discussion that he or his officers would have had with the relevant Tory MPs. We would not have been told about it because civil servants put into effect the decisions of Parliament.

The decisions of Parliament, of course, are mostly dictated by the government of the day, and we have a Tory government.

And who has been able to persuade a Tory to change their mind?

But leading civil servants do have a duty to protect their subordinates and themselves from mistreatment.

So, if the allegations are correct, Sir Philip was right to highlight that civil servants in his department, including himself, had been mistreated by Home Secretary Priti Patel; to point out that this behaviour apparently had the support of the prime minister; and to take legal action over it.

It might be an uncomfortable fact, but a fact is what it is.

If you’re angry about a government policy, don’t blame the civil service for it.

Blame the government you elected.

Source: Victims of the Windrush scandal have little time for complaints about bullying at the Home Office | Amelia Gentleman | Opinion | The Guardian

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Guardian/CST anti-Semitism smear job prompts backlash movement: #EngineOfHope

If there really is an “Engine of Hate” operating in the UK, then it seems The Guardian/Observer and the Community Security Trust (CST) are prominent among those stoking its flames.

Today, the Observer has published a smear piece attacking 36 Twitter accounts – although the reason is not entirely clear.

According to the headline, they are “at heart of Labour antisemitism battle”. Which doesn’t seem too bad. Does it?

The sub-heading suggests they are “pushing pro-Corbyn messages”. Still not too bad.

It’s only when you get to the intro that you realise they have been “used to dismiss claims of antisemitism levelled against the party”. And what’s wrong with that? If an accusation is false, it should be dismissed.

The issue here seems to be that the Guardian/Observer and CST are assuming that all accusations of anti-Semitism against the Labour Party are true. The CST may be expected to have this attitude because it is a charity that claims to be dedicated to protecting Jewish people in the UK and as such, its default position may be to assume the truth of an allegation until the opposite is proved. But a newspaper that has been a pillar of the mainstream media for many decades may be expected to have the opposite view, as it is the responsibility of journalists to be fair and balanced, and to research the truth or falsehood of such claims, rather than make unsubstantiated allegations.

The attitude in this piece can be judged by the title of the CST report on which it is based – that the Twitter accounts mentioned are an “Engine of Hate”.

The Observer piece claims that “the accounts have tweeted content claiming that allegations of antisemitism in the party are ‘exaggerated, weaponised, invented or blown out of proportion, or that Labour and Corbyn are victims of a smear campaign relating to antisemitism'”.

It fails to mention whether or not those claims are accurate.

And of course the linking of no fewer than 36 accounts creates the problem of guilt by association – if even some of the accounts mentioned were actually anti-Semitic, then are the authors or the report trying to induce us into believing that all must be, in the face of evidence to the contrary?

We are told that 12 of the accounts had tweeted anti-Semitic content (but not allowed to judge that content ourselves), and that nine have been deleted between the start of research for the report and its publication (but not whether they were among the 12 we had already been told had tweeted anti-Semitic content).

“All were connected to Twitter networks that have used hashtag campaigns to attack MPs or public figures who have raised concerns about antisemitism and Labour,” we are told. These hashtags include #BoycottRachelRiley, about the Countdown co-presenter who has disgraced herself online with a series of tweets accusing innocent people of anti-Semitism (targets include Noam Chomsky as well as Jeremy Corbyn), and #SackTomWatson, about Labour’s deputy leader whose conduct should need no rehearsal here.

And what about the hashtag #GTTO, which stands for “Get The Tories Out”? What’s anti-Semitic about that?

People posting under these hashtags are described by the newspaper as Twitter “networks” – and this is misleading. Twitter networks are more accurately groups of accounts that post together about many subjects, not accounts posting under a particular hashtag. An example would be the “@GnasherJew” troll network; the account itself is anonymous and believed to be run by several different people, and it has several satellite accounts that consistently join it in its false claims that others are anti-Semitic.

The comment from Mr Watson is amusing in its irony. He suggests that the report be shown to “the dominant faction that control our party’s national executive” to explain “how a small group … can influence our internal discussions”. Can this not be levelled at those like himself, Margaret Hodge, Wes Streeting and others, who have influenced the national executive’s internal discussions with their incessant (and often false) anti-Semitism accusations?

Margaret Hodge, for example, submitted around 200 anti-Semitism complaints to the party’s disputes team, who found that more than 100 of them did not even refer to members of the Labour Party.

Accusations include describing Rachel Riley as “unhinged” and “deranged” for criticising Mr Corbyn. That’s an expression of opinion. And was it based on fact? We aren’t told.

But that did not stop representatives of the CST and the fake charity calling itself the Campaign Against Antisemitism from using these insubstantial claims as though they were proof of a co-ordinated network, rubbishing genuine accusations of anti-Semitism.

The CST’s rep claimed: “Our report reveals how they set the tone and drive the vitriol on social media, attacking anyone who criticises the party’s appalling failure to deal with its antisemitism problem.”

And the CAA’s rentaquote added: “Prominent Labour party figures and rank-and-file members and supporters have long been denying the antisemitism crisis in Labour by claiming that Labour and Jeremy Corbyn are victims of a smear campaign.”

For the record: Complaints of anti-Semitism have been made against 0.05 per cent of the Labour Party’s membership – that less than one per cent of the national average. Anti-Semitism in the Labour Party is negligible and the only reason the party is having trouble coping with it is the huge number of false and vexatious accusations submitted by individuals like Margaret Hodge.

The CAA commenter added: “Labour’s outriders on social media have been fuelling this and meting out appalling abuse to those who stand up against antisemitism.”

This is extraordinariily hypocritical from a man speaking in support of (for example) Rachel Riley, one of whose supporters tweeted this to me:

It’s mild in comparison with what some of their victims have received, I’m told.

But then, none of the owners of accounts accused by the CST have been given the right of reply. Not one.

Why not, Observer?

I’d like to know what the owners of the accused accounts have to say. They are:

@SocialistVoice (see tweet below)
@RAYHALL10
@Sargent_Sellers
@WarmongerHodges
@MyArrse
@Cornish_Damo
@YEqual
@otivar55 (see tweet below)
@georgegalloway
@corbynsgeordie
@damian_from
@Muqadaam
@BiztheBuz
@moodynotblue
@petergloss
@labour_party_supporter
@Rachael_Swindon
@helensclegel
@corbynator2
@asawinstanley
@mac123_m
@ScouseGirlMedia
@The_Awakened
@evolvepolitics
@LuckyHeronSay
@joan32173631
@chelleryn99
@davcon73
@zele_zeka
@JulietB270880
@James4Labour
@Allchanges
@MomentumCV
@55krissi55
@NeverSoPretty
@minxymartin

Without knowing their side of the story, this is not balanced reporting; it is a smear. From now on, my advice is: Treat the Observer as fake news and avoid anything said by the CST altogether.

The good news, though, is that the story has provoked a backlash on Twitter, under the hashtag #EngineOfHope. Here are some examples:

https://twitter.com/TrendsUK/status/1158028961277980675

Follow the hashtag #EngineOfHope for more, along with uplifting tweets about Mr Corbyn and Labour’s plans for the future.

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Here’s the reason ‘centrist’ commentators are pretending to be upset about Labour’s Brexit policy

It seems the year in politics is to end with the same kind of story we’ve seen all through – manufactured outrage at a false claim about Jeremy Corbyn.

It has been Labour’s policy to respect the result of the European Union membership referendum ever since the votes were counted in 2016.

Labour set six tests for any decoupling deal with the EU, and it is in accordance with party policy that its MPs must vote against Mrs May’s deal; it does not pass those tests.

If the deal is voted down, Labour would then seek a general election on the basis that the vote showed Parliament has no confidence in the Conservative government – and with the aim of negotiating a new Brexit deal on a different timetable.

That does not mean Mr Corbyn’s Labour would not support a second referendum, or that it would support leaving the EU if one happened. If Labour fails to secure a general election, all options remain on the table – and if Labour wins a general election but fails to secure a deal that meets its six tests, again, all options remain on the table. It will be for the party’s membership to decide national policy.

Yet this was the headline in The Guardian on December 22:

The comment by Ealing Labour for Jeremy Corbyn is accurate with regard to the same newspaper’s earlier article.

So, in addition to my comments above, let’s remind ourselves of a few more facts about Labour’s policy on Brexit:

https://twitter.com/James4Labour/status/1076425195391455232

This is worth remembering, also:

But look at the reactions, and the people who are reacting. Here’s a centrist Labour MP:

An anti-Corbyn journalist and author:

Hugo Rifkind:

Professor Brian Cox:

And others. We’ll get to them after we consider the criticisms the story has attracted:

https://twitter.com/ToryFibs/status/1076496115263045632

As the wave of manufactured outrage rose, other news outlets joined in the attack on Mr Corbyn:

https://twitter.com/ToryFibs/status/1076499516642217984

The similarity between these stories was pronounced – down to the use of the same photograph and the fact that only a superficial effort was made to change the wording of the headline – that some have suggested that there has been a co-ordinated effort to discredit the Labour leader:

<em>Sky News</em> also got in on the act:

https://twitter.com/Wirral_In_It/status/1076400391015804929

So the ‘centrists’ (if that’s what you want to call them) who attacked Mr Corbyn have found themselves attacked in turn – but commentators keen to promote the facts, rather than their nasty fiction.

So Guardian hack John Harris had the following welcome for his comments:

Former Liberal Democrat press officer turned SNP supporter James Melville came in for particularly strong criticism (and the reason is clear – he was claiming to have supported Mr Corbyn when this is highly questionable):

https://twitter.com/Wirral_In_It/status/1076455046869594112

Carole Cadwalladr should have known better (we’ll discuss the validity of her criticism later, though):

Author (and Mastermind winner) Emma Kennedy earned this withering put-down by Tom Clark, author of Another Angry Voice:

And this from Owain Gardner:

Anti-Brexit campaigner Mike Galsworthy won himself this response:

But Harry Potter author JK Rowling deserves an article of her own for making this story about her. She reckoned the people who took issue with her for attacking Mr Corbyn were unreasoning supporters of the Labour leader, when in fact they were simply pointing out the facts about Labour Party policy. Her attempt at a Biblical writing style, to match her claim that Mr Corbyn’s supporters had turned him into a religious figure, attracted considerable scorn…

https://twitter.com/SeemaChandwani/status/1076501195546607616

… but she still managed to attract an article of her own:

https://twitter.com/JackDunc1/status/1076536988235370497

You’ll have to look up that one for yourself!

The message is clear: Mr Corbyn was reiterating a Labour policy that has been known for years and his critics – both writing the news articles and commenting on them – were trying to pretend it was a change of direction dictated by the Labour leader. The scorn they have received is, therefore, justified:

That being said, let’s return to Carole Cadwalladr’s concern about the legality of the EU referendum. She has a point – as do the following two commentators:

They are right. The EU referendum was a stitch-up and, to be honest, once even suspicions about this became evident, the whole process of leaving the EU should have been suspended, pending a full criminal investigation and a decision on whether the result is legitimate or not.

As this has not happened, I can only conclude that someone has a vested interest in ensuring that Brexit goes ahead before any decision is made. Someone in the Conservative government, that is. Labour has no power in this matter.

That is the real story.

But it will go unreported in the mainstream media, as long as the public can be persuaded to oppose Mr Corbyn on the basis of a flimsy lie.

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Theresa May asked Labour supporters to look at her government afresh. They found a stain on their country

“We’ve had a so-called ‘Iron Lady’, but this one’s brass is tarnished beyond control.”

That was just one of the responses to Theresa May’s brazen (see what I did there?) bid to entice disenchanted Labour voters into the clutches of the Conservatives, with the complicity of the formerly left-wing Guardian/Observer. I’m guessing she thought people who believe those papers are still left-wing would be fooled.

That doesn’t seem to have worked out too well for her!

In her begging letter published by the paper, she wrote (reproduced from May’s Facebook page – if you aren’t boycotting the Guardian/Observer, you’re part of the problem):

“I believe that the principles that guide us – security for families and the country, freedom under the rule of law and opportunity for everyone – can unite our people and help build a better future for our country.”

She claimed this meant getting “the best Brexit deal for Britain, one that protects jobs and rights and makes the most of the opportunities that Brexit brings, to play a more global role, while also delivering on the domestic issues that matter to people here at home.

“We are investing in our NHS, to secure it for the future. We are driving up standards in our schools, so every child can get a good start in life. And, 10 years on from the financial crash, we are building an economy that works for everyone in our society.

“These are our Conservative solutions that will build a country that works for everyone: fixing markets, not destroying them; helping with the cost of living; ending austerity; building an economy of the future which benefits the whole country.”

And she couldn’t resist making a swipe at Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party – getting it into the second paragraph of her begging letter: “Millions of people who have supported Labour all their lives are appalled by what has happened to a once-great party under the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn. Antisemitism has grown, the party’s response to threats to our country’s security has become equivocal, and moderate Labour MPs have become targets for deselection and harassment. These are all alien to Labour’s best traditions.”

Theresa May wouldn’t know any “best traditions” if they had been drilled into her by her priestly father, of course.

On Twitter, she wrote:

“I want” doesn’t get, of course – and the responses online have shown that her bid for acceptance by the people of the country has flopped badly.

The people of the UK told Mrs May in no uncertain terms that her NHS privatisation policies were a disaster for those who needed its help, with waiting times at Accident & Emergency departments now so long that people had died before being seen by a doctor.

They pointed out that NHS trials of drugs that could help the British people were being halted, and that nurses were quitting, because of Brexit.

They denied her claim to be investing in schools, pointing out that teachers have had to appeal to parents for the cost of the pens that pupils need to write down their work. It has also been revealed that a teachers’ pay rise cannot be fully funded by the cash Mrs May has provided, meaning schools must force some staff out of their jobs in order to pay others – or cut the number of hours their teachers work.

They mocked her party’s economic ineptitude, pointing at low growth, the weakness of the Pound, high inflation, low wages and the fact that millions of people now have less than £100 in savings.

They said they were not fooled by her plan for social housing as Conservative policies have forced thousands of families out of their homes – many of them with nowhere to go but the streets, and highlighted the fact that rents were so high that many people had been forced to move away from their communities.

They reminded her that her idea of help with the cost of living, for people who are out of work, sick or disabled, is to slash value of benefits to the point where people fall into debt and despair, with knock-on effects on their mental health that may lead to suicide attempts. Many thousands of people have died.

They pointed out that her idea of help with the cost of living, for women aged in their 60s who have been denied a pension for six years because of Conservative policies, was to become apprentices (if they could get any firm to take them on at that age).

And they said her idea of help with the cost of living, even for people in work, was to send them to a food bank.

They said her foreign policy in general – and Brexit in particular – had made her government an international laughing-stock.

And as for protecting jobs and rights – they pointed at her racist “hostile environment” policy and the effect it had on the Windrush generation. The obvious question is: Who’ll be next to feel the Tory pinch?

They pointed out that racism, Islamophobia and anti-Semitism are rife in the Conservative Party.

And they raised the issue of burning injustices (remember Mrs May’s promise to end those) that she had not mentioned:

  • The fact that she had bribed the Democratic Unionist Power to help her stay in office after she threw away her Parliamentary majority in the 2017 general election.
  • The fact that she had cut police numbers by more than 20,000, leading to a catastrophic crimewave.
  • The fact that her government had managed to avoid prosecutions in scandal after scandal.
  • And the fact that she had lied – again – when she said austerity was over at this year’s Conservative Party Conference; more cuts are on the way and she has absolutely no intention to restore funding for essential services.

They summed it all up by saying they had taken her advice and looked at her government afresh…

And all that they found was a stain on the nation.

See for yourself. Here is just a sample of the responses she received:

https://twitter.com/Kimmari88214930/status/1048875339802402818

https://twitter.com/GRANNYMUGGER/status/1048876864876564481

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UPDATE: Guardian journalists to host lecture by Canary editor whether they like it or not

Kerry-Anne Mendoza, editor in chief of The Canary.

Despite protests by journalists at the Guardian/Observer, the Claudia Jones memorial lecture will be hosted by that paper’s chapel (branch) of the National Union of Journalists, and the speaker will be Canary editor in chief Kerry-Anne Mendoza.

For further information, see my previous article.

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Journalists’ outrage at Canary editor’s speech invitation boosts ‘Boycott the Guardian’ campaign

Kerry-Anne Mendoza, editor in chief of The Canary. This shot is from a Newsnight appearance in 2016, in which she promoted other members of the New Left Media, including Vox Political.

This is a story about treacherous people getting their just desserts.

The editor-in-chief of The Canary – This Site’s friend Kerry-Anne Mendoza – has been honoured with an invitation to give the Claudia Jones Memorial Lecture, as part of the series held in memory of the pioneering black female journalist.

The lecture is organised by the National Union of Journalists’ Black Members Council and the choice of speaker is nothing to do with the Guardian-Observer chapel (that’s their word for a branch) of the NUJ – but it seems these reporters complained bitterly at the choice of speaker:

https://twitter.com/MarkDiStef/status/1045023451390636034

The release of Mark Di Stefano’s tweet (above) prompted something of a backlash. The fact that white journalists at the Guardian were seeking to vote that one of UK media’s only black/minority ethnic editors-in-chief be stopped from giving the Claudia Jones Memorial Lecture for Black History Month was considered by many to be a sign of The Guardian officially losing the plot.

Kerry-Anne herself said: “I’m a proud member of the National Union of Journalists and honoured to be invited to give the Claudia Jones Memorial Lecture this year.

“It’s a sign of the entitlement of our establishment journalists that they would behave so poorly in response.

“I think we’ve reached peak Guardian. A group of mostly white, middle class journalists trying to stop one of Britain’s only working class, BAME editors in chief from giving a speech for Black History Month.”

Followers of the social media agreed – and it just happened to be the case that a Twitterstorm in support of the hashtag #BoycottTheGuardian had been arranged, to take place between 7pm and 9pm on September 27. You can understand why Kerry-Anne called for us all to support it:

It trended at number one.

Kerry-Anne herself received a lot of support:

But The Guardian‘s change of editorial policy to one that undermines the Labour Party and its leader was also targeted:

In fact, this had been the intention behind the Twitterstorm – and it would have received much less attention if the Guardian-Observer NUJ chapel’s members had just kept their mouths shut (or their typing fingers away from whatever messaging system they have been using).

The result of all this activism is not yet known. The NUJ itself has said nothing on the subject.

It is possible that the Establishment will try to hush up the fact that there has been a huge protest against what can be seen as a clear example of racism by mostly white, middle-class university-graduate journalists.

If that happens, we’ll just have to run another campaign – bigger, louder, and impossible to ignore. Repression always incites rebellion.

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