Tag Archives: I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here

Matt Hancock to be on I’m a Celebrity? Isn’t that a contradiction in terms?

Here’s the story:

So: disgraced former Health Secretary Matt Hancock, who was removed from office after being caught on CCTV having a lockdown-busting snog with someone who wasn’t his wife, is to be a contestant on ITV’s I’m a Celebrity, Get Me Out of Here.

The problem is that he is still a sitting member of Parliament and, while he might insist that his office staff will continue to provide an adequate service to his West Suffolk constituents, he still won’t be in Parliament to take part in important votes during most of November.

It’s no wonder the Conservative Party has withdrawn its whip from him, then.

There’s a lot of commentary on this. Let’s have a couple of videos:

I love the comment about Hancock being “in a jungle, sucking on a worm”. Is his girlfriend also going to Australia, then?

And is it a justifiable criticism to suggest that Hancock is stealing his MP salary, because he is taking reality TV money as well?

Sorry everyone, but here’s Ann Widdecombe:

I’m willing to bet she does watch the show, in the end.

Her other points seem good, though. Hancock wants to raise his profile but, by doing so, he’s betraying the dignity of his office. He wants to raise awareness of a dyslexia campaign – but it will probably be edited out of televised episodes of the show.

But what do members of the public think?

I asked readers of the Vox Political Facebook page – and it’s fair to say the question attracted quite a few responses, in spite of the algorithm that restricts readership to only around 350 of the 42,000 people who follow the site there.

“I don’t usually vote for who does the trials, but this year I’m looking forward to voting, hope Hancock is ready,” wrote Rose Dixon. This may be an idea whose time has come.

Helen Selling seems to think so: “I’d be astonished if he didn’t get more votes to do foul tasks than all the others put together.” But she also stated: “ITV have probably given him at least twice the usual ‘celebrity’ fee because they know without a doubt they will rake in millions from all the people in the UK who will ring in because they have good reason to hate Hancock more than any other ‘celebrity’ ever.” That’s a depressing thought.

“He’s absent from work without any valid reason – that would be the sack in most places of employment,” pointed out Lisbeta Ingles. “Just suspending the whip isn’t enough.”

Fiona Dowdeswell Simmons may have commented for us all when she stated: “I’m hoping against hope that he gets lost in the jungle and at times there’ll be future random sightings of him waving a cobbled together spear while snarling.”

Andy Wrathbone may have been more realistic with this offering: “Just goes to show how desperate the media are for celebrities i guess. I hope the vile Tory mollusc chokes on a cockroach… (apologies to the cockroach)…Unless HE IS the Cockroach ,(perfectly feasible), In which case I retract my original Cockroach apology and hope he chokes on a Scorpion, (apologies to the Scorpion).”

Why is he going? Brian O’Reilly has a thought about that: “It might have something to do with him been responsible for the deaths of thousands of elderly people when he said we have put a ring around care homes and then sent people from hospital back into care homes without checking if they had Covid.”

Adding to this, here’s Andrew Turner: “Well somebody is keeping up the tradition of exporting criminals to Aussie..Hope he gets a one way ticket.”

But this leads us on to a new question – of public perception. Rob Allen makes the point well: “Disgrace. The man is appalling- yet watch the public ‘relate’ to him despite the tragic consequences of his tenure. People who had or have family in nursing homes know this well. What a nation of idiots we have become.”

Is this the plan – for Hancock to be rehabilitated in the eyes of the public, despite the many thousands of deaths for which he is principally responsible? If so, it’s our duty to make sure the attempt fails.

Have YOU donated to my crowdfunding appeal, raising funds to fight false libel claims by TV celebrities who should know better? These court cases cost a lot of money so every penny will help ensure that wealth doesn’t beat justice.

https://www.crowdjustice.com/case/mike-sivier-libel-fight/


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Could Joel Dommett’s Skype sex confession halt rise in blackmail-related suicides over ‘sextortion’?

Joel Dommett admitted he had been made to look like a turkey for following his heart, not his head [Image: ITV].

Joel Dommett admitted he had been made to look like a turkey for following his heart, not his head [Image: ITV].

The revelation that online ‘sextortion’ is on the rise reminds me very much of comedian Joel Dommett’s story about being induced into cybersex on Skype.

He revealed that he had been “catfished” – lured into a relationship by someone who had adopted a fictional online persona – during the current series of I’m a Celebrity, Get Me Out of Here, on ITV1.

He was encouraged into carrying out certain private activities on a Skype call with this imposter, who then posted it on the Internet immediately before the comedian went into the jungle.

As a result of his confession, Google searches for the clip skyrocketed – but at least Mr Dommett had taken possession of the incident. By admitting what had happened, and his own stupidity in participating, he had ensured that the villain could not blackmail him.

As he admits, though, it’s still a very stupid thing to do.

Perhaps there should be a new strand of sex education in school – teaching youngsters the common-sense fact that sexting someone you’ve never met is extremely silly and may lead to similar situations.

They could use Mr Dommett’s confession in the lessons. Would that – at least partially – cut down on these incidents and their tragic consequences?

Four men killed themselves in the last year after being blackmailed as part of an increasing cyber “sextortion” racket.

International gangs of organised criminals are targeting more and more young men by luring them into potentially compromising positions, the National Crime Agency said.

The number of people reporting financially-motivated cyber enabled blackmails more than doubled from 385 in 2015 to 864 up to November 2016.

This number has risen from nine in 2011.

Sextortion is a form of blackmail where criminals use fake identities to befriend victims online – using websites such as Facebook, Skype or Linkedin – before persuading them to perform sexual acts in front of their webcam.

Source: Sextortion: Rise in blackmail-related suicides over sexual images shared online | The Independent

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Osborne heads for the Outback in bid to make a comeback

George Osborne: He's a nonentity - get him out of here!

George Osborne: He’s a nonentity – get him out of here!

George Osborne is winging his way to Australia to join the campmates in I’m a Celebrity, Get Me Out of Here! – in a bid to restore his popularity after the mauling he has received over his Autumn Statement.

In a canny move, the Chancellor realised that he was far more likely to get his message to the masses by appealing to the show’s average of eight million viewers than in slanging matches on national news programmes.

Also, Ant and Dec are far closer to his intellectual level than the likes of John Humphries.

Mr Osborne reckoned he could justify an appearance on the outback endurance test, as former MP Edwina Currie has been a huge hit on the show, trending worldwide on Twitter several times. Osborne’s only appearances in Twitter trends are currently restricted to #CameronMustGo tweets.

And criticism of a serving MP appearing on the show could be curbed with reference to Nadine Dorries’ turn, a couple of years ago.

However, it is believed that Mr Osborne is planning to bring market forces to the jungle, with a plan to turn leaves into legal tender. He intends to stock up with British evergreen varieties, claiming they are a higher denomination than local Australian foliage, and then buy up everything of value in the camp. He would then ration these out to the other campmates according to the value he attaches to any services they provide for him. This – according to Mr Osborne – will be a “fairer” system for everyone.

He said he got the idea from the late Douglas Adams and, in order to avoid inflation owing to the high level of leaf availability, the first thing he would ask the other campmates to do is embark on an extensive defoliation campaign using wood from the camp fire and – you guessed it – burn down the jungle.

Unfortunately it seems that – like all Conservatives – Mr Osborne is behind the times. As his plane took off yesterday evening, the 2014 series of I’m A Celebrity came to a joyous finale with Carl Fogarty named as the new King of the Jungle.

He will arrive to find the camp empty, the cameras gone, the fire out.

In fact, the scene will be much the same as the one he’ll face in Conservative Central HQ after next year’s general election.

Follow me on Twitter: @MidWalesMike

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This is how democracy ends: Not with violence but with a shrug

Someone has suggested that more people might have voted for participants in today’s ‘bushtucker trial’, on I’m a Celebrity, Get Me Out of Here, than for candidates in the police and crime commissioner elections.

The suggestion was made on the BBC’s ‘live blog’ as results were awaited for the least effective exercise of democracy in British history. Both votes took place yesterday

Voter turnout was expected to be around 15 per cent – the worst ever result in a peacetime election, totalling only two-thirds of the previous worst-ever result, 1999’s European Parliament vote. This statistic raises the obvious observation:

This is not democratic.

How can it be? The vast majority – around 85 per cent of those entitled to vote – never bothered to turn up.

Already the speculation machine is churning out possible reasons for that: Not enough was spent on the election; the government should have funded a mail-out to all voters, explaining what was going on and who their local candidates were; many people did not even receive a leaflet from their candidates; people were being asked to traipse down to a polling station in the middle of winter (actually it’s still technically autumn); it was a dark and wet day.

No. Here’s the reason:

It is a bad idea and the vast majority of the population aren’t stupid enough ever to accept that it is a good one.

As I write this, only one result is in – Wiltshire will have a Conservative police commissioner. One may safely assume that Angus McPherson, elected by a fraction of a 15.3 per cent turnout – and those who did vote had no less than five other candidates to choose from – will be a cheerleader for Tory policies of privatisation and staff cutbacks.

He will receive £70,000 a year to be a figurehead. The people of Wiltshire might just as well have elected the Cerne Abbas Giant.

Bear in mind that the – what is it? – £100 million spent on this election could have funded an extra 3,000 police officers. Instead, the Tory-led Coalition is axing 15,000.

Responding to criticism over the election turnout, the live blog told us policing minister and serial Question Time liar Damian Green said the PCCs were a new idea that would need time for people to get used to.

Mark Easton, the BBC’s Home editor immediately responded: “Real flaw was the public were never persuaded they needed elected police commissioners.”

This is the truth of it – and the idea of commissioners affiliated to political parties was anathema to voters. That’s why they stayed away in droves. Look at these responses, all taken from the live blog (I’m keeping it there to show the strength of feeling on just one news outlet).

John Amos in Plymouth emailed: “I am unhappy that political candidates came first and second in Wiltshire. Police Commissioners should not be political. We do not want a politicised police force.”

Had the choice only been between the three main parties’ stooges I would have spoiled the paper. This will be a disaster for policing,” wrote ‘Richard’ on the BBC news website (and quoted in the live blog).

Araura Berkeley in Glastonbury emailed: “I did vote but am very disappointed in the lack of proper information on candidates – I had early on requested the full info on all my candidates but had to wait until the official leaflets were put through all doors. This was very late on and there was no telephone number whereby I could quiz any of the candidates about their manifesto.”

Nigel Coldwell tweets: Don’t assume low turnout is apathy. I actively didn’t vote. Would’ve spoiled paper but I thought they’d count it in turnout.

Peter Wilson commented on the BBC News website: “Voted last night and learned on arrival that there was a second choice system if there were more than two candidates. Asked how that would work and no-one knew. Presiding officer looked in their information book and still no answer.”

So: A bad idea, handled in a shambolic way.

The Conservatives will say the low turnout is not undemocratic, and people will warm to the idea of having commissioners once they see it in practice.

The response from their opponents will be just as predictable: The next time a union calls a strike, and gets a mandate for it on a low turnout, that will not be undemocratic either.

And you never know, once people see a really big strike happening, they might warm to that as well!