11 reasons the poor are worried that Iain Duncan Smith is back in charge of benefits cuts – General Election 2015 – UK Politics – The Independent

The 11th reason – that the Liberal Democrats aren’t around to block RTU’s plans – casts doubt on the reasoning abilities of the author (they never did anything to stop him; rather, they seemed to egg him on). Other than that, your thoughts are requested.

David Cameron has reappointed Iain Duncan Smith as Work and Pensions Secretary, meaning he will be in charge of making the huge benefit cuts the Conservatives pledged in their manifesto.

Source: 11 reasons the poor are worried that Iain Duncan Smith is back in charge of benefits cuts – General Election 2015 – UK Politics – The Independent

11 thoughts on “11 reasons the poor are worried that Iain Duncan Smith is back in charge of benefits cuts – General Election 2015 – UK Politics – The Independent

  1. Nick

    The many deaths of the past 5 years of the sick and disabled and others will just continue as usual. Hitlers war lasted 6 years and killed millions IDS’s war of austerity will last a lifetime and with the sick and disabled finding no let up they will all up in mental hospitals or as in the past five years in many cases dead and over many decades as a group will be wiped out and as a country i feel that is the route the conservatives have chosen

    1. Mike Sivier Post author

      Yes, I’ve just seen this. She’s a supporter of the death penalty and one of the authors of ‘Britannia Unchained’, which famously claimed that the UK’s workforce were lazy. It was later discovered that the book’s five authors had some of the worst attendance records in Parliament.

  2. Mr.Angry

    Of course he would put a psychopath in charge of such a murderous policy – too much of a gutless person to carry out his vicious plans.

  3. Joan Edington

    Renaming zero-hours contracts to flexible working contracts is ridiculous and I hope people aren’t fooled by this. Flexible hours contracts already exist in many businesses, the one I worked for in my last job, for one. They are very good for workers like single mothers, say, who can choose to work while children are in school, or for two parents who both want to work but can’t afford childcare. These are just two reasons. These contracts, however, provide agreed fixed-hour working, just at a time suitable to worker and employer. Zero-hour contracts, as we well know, provide absolutely no guarantee of work, “exploitative” or otherwise. All they guarantee is uncertainty, stress and usually poverty to workers while allowing employers to get away with forking out pocket-money on a good day.

  4. hstorm

    I do fear that things will be even worse this time, though not so much because the LibDems aren’t there to slow IDS down. It is more because, with a tiny majority in the Commons, David Cameron is likely to have to keep pandering to the extreme right wing in the Tory Party to keep the Government afloat. This means he will be likely to pressure IDS to do even more extreme cuts than over the last five years. (Not that IDS needs much pressure put on him to persuade him to hurt poor people of course.)

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