Resign! Demand is building for Cameron to quit

160408camresign

The image is for an event on Saturday but will David Cameron last that long?

He has admitted lying to the public about money he gained by holding shares in one of the firms his father ran, based in a tax haven to avoid paying UK tax. But Ian Cameron apparently had more than one firm based in a tax haven, and took legal advice on which were the best tax havens to use, so David’s claim that Panama-based Blairmore was a company for people who wanted to invest in dollar-denominated shares doesn’t have substance.

They could have done that from the UK.

Claims by supporters – such as Anna Soubry on the BBC’s Question Time – that Ian Cameron’s behaviour was not illegal are also pointless. David Cameron made a very clear statement that he considered tax avoidance to be “immoral” in 2012. Now we know that he profited from at least one such “immoral” scheme. And from how many more, about which we may still know nothing?

Incidentally, the reason avoidance schemes remain legal is simple: The super-rich and politicians make sure of it. It’s their own little playground because only the super-rich have access to such schemes.

And what about the £300,000 the prime minister inherited from his father in Ian’s will? It was just a little below the Inheritance Tax threshold of £325,000. Anybody who thinks that’s down to luck has not been paying attention.

His Chancellor, George Osborne, once stated on Twitter that … well, see for yourself:

160408osbornetaxevasion

The Cameron scheme was avoidance, not evasion, but the “immoral” thread holds it together with the prime minister’s words of 2012. Strangely, this tweet seems to have gone missing from the Chancellor’s Twitter feed and at the time of writing, he does not seem to have explained why. Of course, Osborne is know to have participated in tax avoidance himself.

How many other cabinet members have tax avoidance skeletons in their Parliamentary cupboards?

Let us be clear: It is the UK’s wealth that has been siphoned off to foreign shores. Public money. Taxes that go unpaid because someone has paid a solicitor to find a way around the law are stolen from the public purse, whether the rich person performing the theft admits it or not.

Let us remember: Cameron justified every cut inflicted on the sick, the disabled and the poor by saying the UK has to “live within its means”. All the while, he knew that tax avoidance schemes including one formerly operated by his own father meant rich people could cheat on their tax, leaving fewer means for the UK to live within.

Let us remind ourselves: David Cameron himself lobbied the EU to ensure that trusts such as Blairmore did not have to conform to transparency rules. Since he had held shares in one such trust in the past, it is not beyond reason to suspect that he had personal reasons for this action. So it was not the behaviour of a statesman acting in the nation’s interests, but may have been that of an individual “looking out for number one”, as the saying goes.

In all of the above, David Cameron has shown that he is not fit to head a national government. His interests are too selfish.

That is why he must resign – or be forced out.

And we haven’t even touched on the many other policy points in which he has acted against the best interests of the United Kingdom yet!

Remember when the Daily Mail denounced Ed Miliband’s father Ralph as the “Man who hated Britain”?

Consider the mass-dismantling of British institutions that has taken place since 2010: The NHS; the welfare state; legal aid; council services, including libraries… the list runs on and on, with schools and the land registry next up for privatisation and our human rights due for the chop in the near future.

Judge anyone by their actions, not their words.

By his actions, if anybody hates Britain, it’s David Cameron.

And that is another reason he must go.

One of his favourite phrases, used many times to justify his decisions is, “because it’s the right thing to do”.

It’s time we told him to resign – because it really is “the right thing to do”.

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33 Thoughts to “Resign! Demand is building for Cameron to quit”

  1. This proves the gov is rotten.it’s immoral. Their callous indifference to parental rights for autistic children and adults locked in ATU’s with early uninvestigated deaths.
    Their callous indifference to struggling disabilities sufferers, while secretly evading tax subsidised by cutting benefits to the poor
    There’s no confidence in the sham gov. Time for an immediate election.

  2. philipburdekin

    Resign is what he should do, he’s failed at just about everything and the people cannot trust a single word that comes out of his mouth, let’s get rid now.

  3. Terry Davies

    Seems resignation is too lenient for Cameron’s deceit.
    Imprisonment after dismissal from Parliament is surely needed as a deterrent for others. Wonder how many other MPs are benefiting from the offshore shares and investments gravy train.?
    worth noting that freezing his bank accounts and other assets pending an investigation would further deter other MPs who should also be subjected to interviews by a task force formed randomly from a peoples panel recruited like a jury from the population.

  4. Michael Broadhurst

    the sooner he goes the better.this govt is the most rotten,corrupt,thieving,callous,immoral,arrogant,
    murdering,bunch of scum its been our misfortune to have been bestowed upon us through all the lies they told during the general election campaign.
    the whole lot should resign en bloc.

    1. Mike Sivier

      The link leads you to “George Osborne on how to avoid inheritance tax”.
      If people post links, can they please explain what the other site is? Otherwise I hesitate to allow the comment because, for all I know, it might be dodgy content.

  5. Mr.Angry

    Out,out, out, out, and now bare faced liar and VP is totally correct all his actions shows his hatred of our country. It’s time he found his true vocation working on a pig farm.

  6. jeffrey davies

    hmm norman law one for them another for us peasants but pay taxes dont be silly they avoid it like the plague jeff3

  7. Resign, yes of course he should. But the, apres Dave? Johnson? Osborne? What a choice. Perhaps that well known back bencher, A.Tory Nutter, will stand?

  8. Well we all knew he was a liar, but even the least capable in maths could work out that h has received money from his father’s estate on which tax had not been paid, which meant he benefitted from getting more than he would have. He should resign, but then I don’t think he is the “right minded” sort of person who would do that.

  9. He should resign and be charged with Manslaughter along with Duncan Smith. The papers are due to be released on Tuesday of how many died at the hands of IDS.The REAL amount this time. Even Crabb’s toes will curl when it comes out. and then Hunt should follow them.

    1. Mike Sivier

      What papers are these?

  10. Jenny Hambidge

    Where is the rest of Ian Cameron’s fortune? He only left his middle son a calculated £300,000 ( some reports say £30,000 ). Interesting……

    1. Mike Sivier

      The £30,000 is what David C made from his shares in Blairmore – plus, of course, 13 years’ worth of dividends.
      The £300,000 is what Ian C left to his son on his (Ian’s) death.

  11. he is a disgrace and a traitor and his parliament should remove him even our queen should demand his removal

    1. Mike Sivier

      The Queen can’t get involved.

      1. I know but she should at least make her views clear

      2. steven mcguire

        she should

  12. Florence

    The main impression I get from Cameron’s “revelations”, and I’m sure I’m only stating the obvious, is a family where avoiding tax is the norm, and is the entire basis for arranging their financial affairs. You mention the £300K, just under the threshold, but the sale of his “shares” – such small beer really but also squeaking just under CGT (assuming you carry it between years) and the apparent value of shares, and the declared taxable dividend that also is tiny, surely that’s not all about sentimental value is it? Who bought the shares in Blairmore? Because it’s an awful lot of bother to go through for (in his financial affairs) for what appear to be small sums, taking it as given that these are huge amounts for the like of us. And life changing sums for the disabled who are about to lose all financial support through UC and Crabb.

  13. Brian

    Investment in “dollar-denominated shares” hardly inspires support for or confidence in the UK economy, this from a head of state, Either way this man and his cronies are manipulating lying hypocrites who should resign their positions and give Britain back to the people. I’m ashamed to be British while these profiteers are still in power.

  14. Lucy

    You only need to delve into their personal lives to see how these tories like spending money or at least the tax payers money…ask the PM’s wife who thinks spending over £50,000 of tax payers money on a fashion aide is justified when there are starving people losing their benefits and homes???

  15. Didn’t he become pm may 2010 and didn’t his father die September 2010
    .

  16. James

    Live by the sword, die by the sword – Cameron should fall on his…but maybe not for a few days yet because it’s lovely watching him squirm after the smugness he’s shown this last few years and the pain he’s caused others.
    Jimmy Carr must be in pain from laughter.

    1. John

      Yeah, I reckon Cameron will survive for much longer than a few days (he’s probably backed up by a few of his Tory mates). Jimmy Carr has already sent a nice tweet. Livingston has just said (although he admitted it was a joke) that he thinks Cameron should go to prison. I actually think he should! Not for the tax stuff, but for all the vulnerable/disabled people that have died on HIS watch.

  17. Colin Glazebrook

    Ironic that they address each other as “honourable member” in parliament.

    1. honour among thieves is it?

  18. James

    Colin Glazebrook said: “Ironic that they address each other as “honourable member” in parliament”.

    Hmm, ‘flaccid members’ would be better.

  19. John Chaos

    The Whole lot of the goverment should resign! ,In fact ALL goverments
    are obsolete , Immoral, Genocidal and monsterous liars!.
    (I may not have the answer for a suitable replacement, but there’s
    got to be a better way than “their” way)
    I mean their only interested in war and making peoples lifes a misery,
    filling their own pockets and ruining lives, Infact
    they’ve ruin this country and are trying to ruin the world too.

  20. Rik

    And who will the next parasite to take over when Cameron falls I wonder?

    1. Mike Sivier

      I don’t know but I promise he wouldn’t last long.

  21. Michael Broadhurst

    i wouldn’t believe CaMoron if he told me the world was round.
    Serial Liar !!

  22. NMac

    On his own admission Cameron is totally immoral. Most of us have known that from day-one. He also surrounds himself with dishonest and immoral people. He must go and the sooner the better.

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