Labour rebels say they’ll challenge Corbyn again if he wins leader election

Jeremy Corbyn exits a hall in Brighton after addressing thousands of supporters on August 2. He also had to talk to hundreds - if not thousands - more people outside the meeting because the venue could not contain everybody who wanted to attend.

Jeremy Corbyn exits a hall in Brighton after addressing thousands of supporters on August 2. He also had to talk to hundreds – if not thousands – more people outside the meeting because the venue could not contain everybody who wanted to attend.

This Writer doesn’t think anyone continuing to challenge Jeremy Corbyn after the end of the current leader election needs to fear deselection.

They could be ejected from the party for actions calculated to harm its reputation.

There are clear rules against attempts to disrupt the party from within. To be honest, it is amazing that some of the agitators – check their names in George Eaton’s New Statesman article – aren’t gone already.

MPs said that further leadership challenges were likely before anyone gave serious consideration to a split. But one added: “If, however, the hard left pursued deselections then those ejected from their own party would most likely feel compelled into a separate party option, which really would be a disastrous split. Unless that’s what McDonnell meant by ‘so be it’.” The shadow chancellor is alleged by leadership candidate Owen Smith to have “shrugged his shoulders and said ‘If that’s what it takes'” when privately challenged on whether he was prepared to split Labour (a claim described by McDonnell as “complete rubbish”).

Corbyn’s opponents believe that some MPs will follow shadow Home Office minister Sarah Champion and return to the frontbench if he wins the contest. But most of the 172 who backed the no confidence motion have no intention of doing so. “We’ve crossed the Rubicon, there’s no going back,” said Streeting. “This is irreparable while Jeremy remains leader.”

Source: Labour rebels dismiss breakaway speculation

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17 thoughts on “Labour rebels say they’ll challenge Corbyn again if he wins leader election

  1. Linwren

    When JC wins the election the rebels must be judged by an independent. That way the media can’t accuse JC as a bully, spitful etc

  2. Florence

    The country is getting the Corbyn message, as he said in one of his speeches to the assembled thousands this week the leadership challenge has enabled him to get around the country and get his policies out to so many, it has been a good thing. The political tide is turning, it is palpable at the mass meetings, and the 172 are being swept aside as an irrelevancy. If John McDonnell shrugged, then he did the only thing possible to convey to the “rebels” that they are nothing, and called their bluff. Good.

  3. Angus Gordon-Farleigh

    When exactly did the simple functionary ‘minions of the voting public’; for that IS the raison d’etre of the MP; begin to think that they have become bigger than their job descriptions and hence start this pernicious ‘cult of personality’ within the ranks of the PLP?

  4. Philip Williams

    Yet again JMcD’s ‘If that’s what it takes’” comment taken out of context. I understood that it was said in response to that the Labour Party would be finished unless it adopted Tory policies.

  5. MarkG

    Can you remember the old Tory poster. New Labour new danger. Labour has fallen in the polls because of the self serving hypocritical traitors. Stop being hypocrites and go join the Tory’s or even the Quisling Lib Dems.

  6. shawn

    Since Jeremy Corbyn was elected leader it has become increasingly apparent that his critics within the Labour Party will say whatever they believe will get him removed as leader. That’s politics, you’ll probably be thinking to yourself; however, what they’ll say could be complete falsehood and/or extremely destructive to the Labour Party, a part instalment in making a much larger lie or merely being economic with the truth. So I will take their mutterings with a ‘pinch of salt’.
    Indeed their actions over the past 11 months, in particular, has dissolved what trust I had in most of them to nothing more solid than ice water. And I suspect by September it will have evaporated into a blast of hot air. I’m beginning to move slowly, and reluctantly, towards the whatever it takes in order to create a real alternative, to austerity, bashing the disabled, the unemployed and its companion, the enrichment of the few at the expense of the other 96% of the electorate (Guargian: Inequality ‘worst since second world war’ Academic Danny Dorling says the last time the best-off took as big a share of all income as they do today was in 1940, two years before the publication of the Beveridge Report Randeep Ramesh Wednesday 27 June 2012 16.55 BST In his Beveridge Memorial Lecture ).
    I also recall an episode of the Amercan comedian Jon Snow’s programme, where he pointed out to President Obama that his attempts to strike a compromise with the Republlican dominated Senate was doomed to failure. He used the analogy of the President trying to get onto a bus with the Republicans, and after that failed to take a short ride in a taxi with them (i.e. a short-term compromise), which was equally unsuccessful. I think the point he made is that those on the right are philosophically, and perhaps psychologically as well, opposed to the concept of compromise. With the degree of support they get from the traditional news media (see the Latest L.S.E. report entitled Journalistic Representations of Jeremy Corbyn in the British Press: From Watchdog to Attackdog) they propably believe they have no need to comprimise. Now when you look at the behaviour of some Blairite M.P’s, especially those who once held positions of power in post- Corbyn Labour, a similar philosophy and character trait appears dominant amongst them. Hence, the ‘whatever it takes’ frame of mind becomes more than an emotional response in the form of: ‘ I’m so fed up with this lot, but, rather, an imperative if we are to change the state of British politics away from elites, media barons and parliamentary private clubs. Groups for whom party members and voters are mere inconvienencies and, as such, can be ignored or misled (in both senses of the word).

    See also: Graham Vanbergen – TruePublica, Democracy In Britain Fully Highjacked By Corporations

    27th October 2015 / United Kingdom

  7. Nigel Bennett

    There are clear rules against attempts to disrupt the party from within. To be honest, it is amazing that some of the agitators – check their names in George Eaton’s New Statesman article – aren’t gone already.

    Couldn’t find the artical you refer to.

    1. Mike Sivier Post author

      So you didn’t see the link to the source material at the end of the article?

  8. Paul Rutherford

    I’m absolutely sick of them all. Absolutely anti-democratic, and at the end of the day, that is a fact that cannot be denied.

    It doesn’t matter to me how they try to justify their anti-Corbyn actions: there simply is no excuse or reason.

    It’s very definitely a ‘black and white’ position. You either support democracy or you don’t. There is no ‘halfway’ in this. All the debate and argument needs to be refocused and all the PLP ought to be asked, publicly, one simple question…

    “Do you believe in Democracy?”

  9. mohandeer

    Deselection is the next step and then complete removal of them from the Labour Party for bringing the party into disrepute or causing deliberate harm to the members movement. When they are all replaced and have found jobs with the LibDems, the real Labour Party can get on with the job it is supposed to be doing – being a competent opposition to the Tory selfservatives and representing the membership. ALL of it not just the monied minority.

    1. Rupert Mitchell (@rupert_rrl)

      They are certainly detrimental to the Labour party and to those many thousands of loyal members and it would be better to get rid of them now rather than let this saga continue. If they want to form some breakaway party let them do so but at least that will leave us able to continue with a clean run with Jeremy Corbyn and without their contamination.

  10. tom

    Time has come to a good clearing up and the rats who finely came out of their holes thanks to the brexit have the courage to stand down and i for once will wish them good luck with the Lib/Dem for their new party.
    Let the Labour party brush off the bad apples and start representing the working force who will always be behind his deserving leader.

  11. David Goldthorp

    What a waste of time and energy, They should be going after the Tories, not Jeremy.

Comments are closed.