The BBC prepares its impartial coverage of the 2017 General Election [Image: Sketchaganda].

It’s astonishing, isn’t it?

Theresa May has announced that she won’t allow even the Conservative-supporting media to her election events; she won’t attend televised election debates (so it seems the BBC and ITV will “empty-chair” her – about the only decision the mass media have got right so far); and she won’t meet any members of the public who aren’t hand-picked yes-people, guaranteed not to cause any surprises.

And yet the media (even the empty-chairing BBC) are still slavishly promoting the Tory line, in defiance of all common sense.

Look at the way Barry Gardiner had to upbraid Adam Boulton on Tory-supporting Sky News after he let the Tories off the hook for their failure to control immigration:

Look at the way Tom London had to berate the BBC’s Nick Robinson for attacking Jeremy Corbyn when – as a news reporter – he is required to be impartial:

Look at the responses to the BBC’s (again) John Humphrys after he complained that Labour would penalise the rich:

Already the BBC – which has a Tory-run board and whose news department is run by Conservatives – is shaping up to be a principle offender against the impartiality it claims to champion. I’ll just leave the next few tweets here without comment:

But of course the Beeb is only part of the problem:

We’re seeing astonishing about-turns:

(Actually the Oakeshott volte-face should be no surprise as she’s an airhead Tory columnist but the two-facedness of it should be a revelation to the uninitiated.)

We’ve seen gross violations of decency and good taste, like this Sun headline that tramples on the memory of Jo Cox:

And we’ve seen more subtle digs at the Labour Party, by news media whose allegiance is clearly Tory but whose editors seem to want to keep that hidden:

Sue Jones reckons this is reason for it:

One definition of the Bandwagon Effect runs as follows: “The bandwagon effect is a psychological phenomenon in which people do something primarily because other people are doing it, regardless of their own beliefs, which they may ignore or override. The bandwagon effect has wide implications, but is commonly seen in politics and consumer behavior.”

So they’re all touting the Tory line because everybody else is? I don’t buy it. They’re doing it because Labour has the strongest policies of any UK political party in decades – policies that support the people, rather than the rich and the corporations they run – and the corporate media are afraid.

That’s why they’re trying to run Jeremy Corbyn into the ground.

And what did he do?

He made a joke out of it – and them:

Meanwhile, the corporate, Tory-controlled media – in its first anti-Corbyn attack of the campaign – misfired:

And members of the public are standing up against the pro-Tory, anti-Labour narrative, everywhere:

This is the new media territory, folks. The vested interests don’t have total control over the debate any more.

Ordinary people like you and I have a public voice, thanks to the social media, phone-ins on the radio and television, and instant polling.

Did you know ITV’s This Morning has been running a poll on who viewers think should be the next Prime Minister? Well it has.

And do you know who was winning, last time This Writer checked, with 66 per cent of all votes cast?

Jeremy Corbyn.

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