What was that about the NHS again, Nigel?

A reminder: Nigel Farage might not be a Tory but he's another supporter of fox hunting - so might as well be, in this case. This speaks volumes about the other members of UKIP.

Nigel Farage: He’s a big fan of Margaret Thatcher; he likes fox hunting; he mixes with big-name right-wingers in the UK and the USA; and he wants to scrap the National Health Service – but he wants you to believe his party, UKIP, is for the people. Pull the other one, Nigel!

Thanks to our friends on the social media for flagging up the following:

Nigel Farage has admitted he still wants the NHS scrapped in favour of US-style insurance scheme

But in a new BBC interview that was set to be aired this morning (January 20), Mr Farage said ditching the NHS is “a debate we’re going to have to return to”.

He clarifies that it was only abandoned as official UKIP policy due to pressure from worried pals.

Mr Farage said: “I triggered a debate within UKIP that was outright rejected by my colleagues, so I have to accept that.

“As time goes on, this is a debate that we’re all going to have to return to.”

This will be extremely disappointing for UKIP supporters who have been protesting that their policy is not to scrap the NHS, ever since the damning 2012 video of Mr Farage calling for its demise went public last November.

What will they say now?

It seems likely this article’s comment column will have the answer in short order.

Follow me on Twitter: @MidWalesMike

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16 thoughts on “What was that about the NHS again, Nigel?

    1. Mike Sivier Post author

      In this case I think the supporters may be excused, as it’s the leaders who are causing the confusion. Clearly Farage will say anything to get elected – much like his fellow Tories. Did I write ‘fellow Tories’? Oh well, if the hat fits…

  1. paul hawkins

    Here’s the two faced liar in action again. Private healthcare insurance means a bad service for you and £Billions for Farage and his banking chums.

      1. Florence

        Mike, I want to know how Unum and their acolytes in business and academia have managed to turn all our politicians – and campaigners – into true believers that the sick & disabled are (a) a waste of air and (2) very useful profit centres.

        I look forward to your thoughts!

      2. Mike Sivier Post author

        They’re not my thoughts, but have you seen the latest article from Mo Stewart, on this site?

      3. Florence

        Yes, I have now, and a fine piece it is too. But Mike, it still doesn’t cover WHY, after years of fines & being declared unfit and unscrupulous & robbers in the US has this discredited dogma captured the hearts & minds of ALL they target? I mean, there is enough published literature, and court judgements to show that Unum and their devil-spawn ideologues are just plain wrong. I know that in the right-wing there is the gnawing evil of social Darwinism, and eugenics (see IDS and his recent “reduce the working class breeding” policy), but why do those in Labour seem to be so easily taken by these snake oil salesmen against our century of gains in social responsibility, inclusion and the welfare state? Where is their humanity?

  2. Mikki

    Has anyone asked him why he favors a system that will cost us twice as much for fewer successful health outcomes ?

  3. Andy

    We have to acknowledge that there are many different points of view as to how the NHS should be run. Why on earth would we want to emulate the most inequitable and inefficient health care system in the world is beyond me. Why are we always looking to the USA and not our european partners? Sorry I forgot the EU is responsible for the downfall of the UK.

  4. Gary Burley

    people like myself who need regular care for Diabetes, others who suffer from cancer or asthma or general lifelong illnesses, would under his plans most likely be denied service, because we are an insurance hazard, meaning ‘go away and die somewhere out of sight’. unacceptable and very very wrong. it’ll be 1910 all over again, hospitals are empty except for the odd toff. and down in the ghettoes where we all will be residing under TTIP zero hour wages, is where we will be listening to the screams of people too poor to pay for the medical they desperately need. only this will be the alternate reality 100 years on where Aneurin Bevan no longer exists and we’re doomed to serve the rich and the tories with no unions, rights or compassion. downton abbey style with us as the uneducated maids, servants and washer women and men, while the tories wipe away any memory we had of being a fair or equal society

  5. Marcus de Mowbray

    When Nigel Fartage says he wants the NHS scrapped in favour of an “American-style” service, does he mean “like” the American system or “given to American companies to run their way”? Does anyone know why so many British politicians, particularly Tory and Fartage are SO KEEN to give just about everything to American and other Foreign companies? Why do so few of them wish to support British business? Tories worship Adam Smith, but if he came back to life now and saw the huge number of sell-offs to foreign companies he would demand that these politicians get prosecuted for High Treason!

    1. Mike Sivier Post author

      I think the answer to that depends on how much damage is done – the longer the Tories remain in office, the worse it will be – and how much money is available. When Labour took office in 1997, the damage was extensive and vital work was needed immediately – but the money wasn’t there. That forced Labour to consider using PFI to plug the funding gap – with unpleasant consequences further down the line, as we all know. Right-wing critics will try to use that against Labour but it seems clear that Tony Blair and those around him believed there was no other way at the time; if the detractors wish to argue the point, let them explain how they would have solved the problem.

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