The government need to learn about the link between correlation and causality. Denial of culpability is not good enough.

This one’s a bit tricky to paraphrase, but the argument about the tactics of the Department for Work and Pensions is important.

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Source: The government need to learn about the link between correlation and causality. Denial of culpability is not good enough. | Politics and Insights

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6 Thoughts to “The government need to learn about the link between correlation and causality. Denial of culpability is not good enough.”

  1. John.

    The general population are stupidified, that’s not to say they’re entirely stupid, just lazy of independent thought and increasingly fearful of losing what dwindling little they have.

    With that in mind, the nasties PR tactic is simply to lie, deceive and deny, when that doesn’t work, just keep lying and denying until something new comes along and the problem “goes away”.

    They know the attention span of the zombie masses is governed by the captured corporate media, so they only need hold out with the lies and denials for about two days before the gutter tory press move on to a new story sharpish and the rest follow like sheep in five days or so, the masses then lose interest and it’s suddenly a distant memory.
    The latest celeb gossip and sports news soon grab the headlines again, calm is restored and all is well in the “aspirational” world once more.

    1. Too true, John. I swear people’s attention spans are being purposely diminished – nudged away and replaced with shortcuts to comfort enclaves and mindless pap.

      I’ve been blocked and unfriended by in-laws because of my “boring banging on” about politics. BUT … I’m an ordinary sick and disabled person amongst the ordinary masses who just happens to understand stats and methodological issues in the social sciences. And others will see, even if it’s only from the corner of their eye, that something is very wrong in the UK, that people are dying as a consequence of govt policies, and the govt are denying it loudly, as if that is some kind of appropiate response. It is sometimes an expected response, but only ever from despots.

  2. Neilth

    Coincidentally I am re-reading The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists by Robert Tressell. Plus ca change etc.

    If you haven’t read it I thoroughly recommend it. Most of the arguments made in that book over 100 years ago are still relevant today, and tragically becoming more so.

  3. James

    In truth I really don’t believe that Iain Duncan Smith and David Freud could care less about the ill, even deadly, effects that spin-off from their mistaken policies: like generals sending their men into certain death seeking to bolster their own reputations with the hierarchy, egocentric and monomaniacal people like this only really care about implementing as much of their programmes and designs as possible, no matter how mistaken, no matter how pernicious, no matter how many people suffer or die to sate their vanity and folly.

  4. The British have long been sheep that believe any old guff they’re told, no backbone, no brain, no common sense, no nothing, just a bunch of stupid trolls who grunt and groan and let themselves be pushed around by the state and we wonder why the UK is in the state it’s in!

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