Let’s not resign disabled people to this fate – Cherylee Houston

Incontinence pants: Cherylee Houston has been outspoken in her protests against the Conservative Government's disability despotism - here highlighting how the Tories proposed to give disabled people more independence.

Incontinence pants: Cherylee Houston has been outspoken in her protests against the Conservative Government’s disability despotism – here highlighting how the Tories proposed to give disabled people more independence.

Most readers will probably know that Cherylee Houston is a star of top soap Coronation Street – and is herself disabled.

That’s why her article in Standard Issue is important. She is a disabled woman in the public eye, deploring her government’s persecution of the disabled.

Standard Issue bills itself as “for all women”, but this article is really for everybody. Please take the time to read it.

“While they are defensible in narrow terms, given the continuing deficit, they are not defensible in the way they were placed within a budget that benefits higher earnings taxpayers.” Iain Duncan Smith, 18 March 2016

How ‘narrow’ do the terms have to be to make disabled people choose between food and heat?

The problem with systematic bullying is that it can go on undetected for years. And it’s only now that a crowd has gathered to see our heads against the floor and the boot coming in for one final big kick that someone in the gang has had to take the fall for the punishment. And while it is the one wearing the boot, the rest of the gang are still here, hoping previous misdemeanours will go unnoticed.

The cull is happening and my fear is that one of the bullies holding his hands up for no more is a weapon to silence the upsurge of our anger. Don’t see this as disabled people winning. The torment has temporarily halted, that’s all. We still need the belongings back that the bullies cruelly snatched and we’re looking over our shoulders, worried as to from which angle they will pounce on us next.

Source: Let’s not resign disabled people to this fate – Standard Issue

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5 thoughts on “Let’s not resign disabled people to this fate – Cherylee Houston

  1. shawn

    I totally agree: last week could well turn out to be the moment ‘the wheelchair turned’. Some charities have asked MP’s who voted through a 30% (just under) cut to WRAG to resign as patrons of their charity and IDS resigned and made some very telling comments as to why he could no longer remain the DWP minister. Tory MP’s voted though the chancellor’s budget, but made it clear he would have, and that they were happy to, accept a £4 billion hole in his economic plan for Britain’s finances. Does this mean they have come to realize that Osborne’s economic plan is, as most mainstream economists have been arguing for years, more based on political ideology than economic theory (see Professor Simon Wren-Lewis’s mainlymacro blog for the complete detailed economic reasoning behind my statement). For that is the consequence of their action not to back his plan to cut PIP numbers. It’s down to us all to capitalize on these major events.
    As I’ve noted before whether baring our justifiable anger in full against those
    Tories who have brought the latter of these events about is a difficult point. And even if logic makes it clear that qualified support, or at least keeping quite to a more beneficial moment in time, is the best action; doing so may not be possible due to the horrendous suffering inflicted upon us (the disabled) and lives lost. However, we must win this battle for ourselves and future generations of British people (no one knows if disability is just around the corner).
    shaunt

  2. paulrutherford8

    Ros Wynne-Jones [in the photo, left], of the Mirror, is a star amongst journalists. She’s always there when disabled people need a voice, with her i-phone, hwe support… and always on a deadline!

  3. Barry Davies

    Maybe Coronation street could have her sanctioned or all her benefits taken away, I don’t watch it myself but these sort of shows have highlighted the problems of sections of society before.

Comments are closed.