The racist thugs who are Andrea Leadsom’s fox hunting friends | Pride’s Purge

Reblogged from Pride’s Purge to demonstrate the kind of person the Conservatives are considering as Prime Ministerial material: Bloodthirsty, savage and, it seems, consorting with racists.

Our potential future PM Andrea Leadsom really really likes killing foxes.

She regularly attends meetings and fundraising balls for the infamous Grafton Hunt:

leadsom grafton hunt

Grafton is infamous because it uses hooded thugs to attack hunt monitors and has members who are openly racist:

And sadly these people appear to be in charge of our country now …

Source: The racist thugs who are Andrea Leadsom’s fox hunting friends | Pride’s Purge

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6 Thoughts to “The racist thugs who are Andrea Leadsom’s fox hunting friends | Pride’s Purge”

  1. NMac

    To be a supporter of any kind of blood “sports”, where animals are deliberately killed for pleasure means you are an obnoxious and loathsome character. That this woman Leadsom mixes with them says everything that need be said about her. It fills me with despair that these people are being let loose on power.

  2. I don’t want FILTH of that ilk in this country let alone running it.

  3. Andrea Leadsom cv has been in doubt as to the integrity of it ?

    Thresa may like myself are both from the bank of England and worked there at the same time.

    i was one of the governors personal servants in the parlours where as may was just a finance Clark

    my reference from the bank of england clearly states that my honesty and integrity were never in doubt

    this is a very rare reference to behold and it’s most unlikely that may would be able to match mine

  4. Has the Hunting Act been a success in preventing fox hunting in the UK?

    Many campaigns in relation to the Hunting Act have felt that the law is confusing and that it is aimed directly at prosecuting people rather than in fact protecting the rights of the animals. Fox hunting is a practice that continues throughout the UK within the parameters of the law as huntsmen are shooting the foxes which is not deemed a criminal act under the Hunting Act 2005.

    Furthermore many feel that policing such things as hunting in the countryside is taking valuable police resources away from other important areas of policing in the countryside such as the use of illegal drugs and theft from the elderly.

    In a word – NO!

    1. Mike Sivier

      I thought the point of the Hunting Act was to prevent foxes being hunted to death by human beings for the purposes of enjoyment.
      It was accepted that the fox population needs to be controlled, but by humane means. So shooting the foxes is better than letting dogs rip them to pieces.
      Am I mistaken?

      1. Yes, I thought that too. However, the hunts still use packs of dogs to chase the foxes. over hill and dale, in blood thirst pursuits.

        The Hunting Act does nothing to stop people from participating in the ceremony of the hunt and riding across the country on horseback with their hounds, nor from participating in cruelty free alternatives such as drag hunting. It only stops the violent spectacle of an animal being torn limb from limb.

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