Will Jeremy Corbyn agree to reinstate shadow cabinet elections?

Corbyn’s allies have previously said such a move would be aimed at boxing him in [Image: Robert Perry/Rex/Shutterstock].

Corbyn’s allies have previously said such a move would be aimed at boxing him in [Image: Robert Perry/Rex/Shutterstock].


The restoration of shadow cabinet elections seems an appallingly mistimed idea, even if it is being proposed by well-intentioned supporters.

If such elections were reinstated, Mr Corbyn’s detractors in the Parliamentary Labour Party would do their best to ensure that positions went to MPs who would hinder his policies at every possible opportunity – against the wishes of the majority of Labour Party members.

It would be a victory for the selfishness of a very few MPs over the needs of the United Kingdom, but that won’t matter to them.

This Writer can foresee a time when it will be possible to reinstate shadow cabinet elections, but it isn’t now.

Labour’s wider membership is incensed at the behaviour of the 170-odd MPs who have forced an unnecessary leadership election on the party when they should have been uniting to attack a weakened Conservative Party.

Members in constituency parties across the country are demanding the opportunity to release their current MPs from any opportunity to stand as candidates in the future – and to choose candidates for the next general election from their own membership.

It seems likely that only after such procedures have been carried out and a new intake of MPs is elected – people who are likely to agree with Mr Corbyn’s principles (which are, after all, the principles of the Labour Party) – it will be possible to elect a shadow cabinet that supports the current aims of the party and its leader.

Alternatively, perhaps any shadow cabinet election should be opened up to the membership, in the same way as leader elections and elections to the National Executive Committee.

Does anybody have the stamina for that?

Jeremy Corbyn is to face a formal call to reintroduce elections to the shadow cabinet when a motion is put to the parliamentary party on Monday.

Clive Betts, the MP for Sheffield South East, proposed the suggestion, which supporters hope could be approved and sent forward to the party’s conference this month.

The motion is being presented by supporters as a way of healing the party after a damaging leadership contest, which Corbyn is favourite to win.

Corbyn’s allies have previously suggested that any such move would be a way of boxing in the leader to ensure that the so-called right of the party controls the shadow cabinet.

The likelihood of any such change remains remote, however, because it would require the agreement of the national executive committee and the party conference as well as two-thirds of Labour MPs.

Source: Jeremy Corbyn faces call to bring back shadow cabinet elections | Politics | The Guardian

ADVERT




Join the Vox Political Facebook page.

If you have appreciated this article, don’t forget to share it using the buttons at the bottom of this page. Politics is about everybody – so let’s try to get everybody involved!

Vox Political needs your help!
If you want to support this site
(
but don’t want to give your money to advertisers)
you can make a one-off donation here:

Donate Button with Credit Cards

Buy Vox Political books so we can continue
fighting for the facts.

Health Warning: Government! is now available
in either print or eBook format here:

HWG PrintHWG eBook

The first collection, Strong Words and Hard Times,
is still available in either print or eBook format here:

SWAHTprint SWAHTeBook

9 thoughts on “Will Jeremy Corbyn agree to reinstate shadow cabinet elections?

  1. jeffrey davies

    someones been taking majic mushrooms idiots would have the cabinet in turmoil each time it meet the blairites have to go no if no buts they are to greedie to stay

  2. casalealex

    So, here we go again, the plot thickens.

    So much time and effort is being expended by a group of entrenched MPs, in their effort to bring down a man who many Party members support for his efforts to socially and democratically invigorate the Party.

    One wonders what their end game is, as it looks like they could be reneging on their duties to their constituents – which should be to oppose and change the ever increasingly oppressive machinations of the government.

    The PLP Parliamentary Labour Party made up of all Labour MPs had a SECRET vote to oust Corbyn, and 174 voted to sack him.

    A petition, supposedly from the backstabbing PLP states they have no confidence in the Labour Party membership to make sound decisions. This is a farce! They are bringing the whole Party into disrepute!

    They are basically cutting off their noses to spite their faces. Where would the PLP be if there were no Labour members?

  3. Rupert Mitchell (@rupert_rrl)

    I can’t think of a better response other than to reiterate your views on this matter Mike. For the Labour party to ever regain confidence and respect again it will need to adopt true labour values i.e., those of Jeremy Corbyn and not those of a few under-cover rich millionaire donors who are only there in order to prevent true Labour values from being implemented in order to safeguard their own selfish gains.

  4. Doug

    The Conservative lead in a recent poll has plummeted to a tiny 14%! There’s everything to play for! Enough of the naysayers! Let’s go for it!

    1. Mike Sivier Post author

      That’s four per cent after you strip out the adjustments the pollsters made for no very good reason.

      1. Rachel Hodge

        Im sorry but they did have good reason to make those adjustments. The main adjustment is likehood to vote, what labour voters are saying is “we aint sure if we are going to vote” not surprising considering the turmoil in the party at the moment. But Its important to recognise that Labour needs to give voters something to believe in if it wants its supporters to turn out. I really don’t think Smith can improve that belief factor

      2. Mike Sivier Post author

        The adjustment is based on Labour likelihood to vote at the 2015 general election – before Corbyn and therefore before many of them had a reason to vote.

  5. mohandeer

    Jeremy Corbyn now faces a stark choice. He can betray all those members who have suffered over the last year supporting him against various right wing insults and taunts or he can opt for his “broad church” to encompass those elements many members perceive as the perpetrators of unevidenced abuse by devious and morally corrupt people they want nothing to do with.
    I hope he finds a way to respect the majority of members wishes rather than his own well intentioned desires.
    It is naive to think that after all that has happened in the last year and especially the last few months, that the Labour Party members will forgive and forget. The kind of damage that has been done will take a long time to heal, let those who have thrown mud at the “rabble” earn a return to the LP ranks.

  6. mohandeer

    Jeremy Corbyn now faces a stark choice. He can betray all those members who have suffered over the last year supporting him against various right wing insults and taunts or he can opt for his “broad church” to encompass those elements many members perceive as the perpetrators of unevidenced abuse by devious and morally corrupt people they want nothing to do with.
    I hope he finds a way to respect the majority of members wishes rather than his own well intentioned desires.
    It is naive to think that after all that has happened in the last year and especially the last few months, that the Labour Party members will forgive and forget. The kind of damage that has been done will take a long time to heal, let those who have thrown mud at the “rabble” earn a return to the LP ranks.

Comments are closed.