Brexit questions that the government could and should answer | Tax Research UK

A British bulldog toy at a pro-EU demonstration in London in October last year. [Image: Facundo Arrizabalaga/EPA].

Brexit questions, 1: How many new trade deals will we need? How many people will be needed to work on each? How many people have we got?

Brexit questions, 2: How many tax treaties will need [to be] renegotiated as a result of Brexit? How many people does each take? How many have we got?

Brexit questions, 3: How many trade deals has the UK signed in the last ten years? How long did each take to conclude, on average?

Brexit questions, 4: How many laws will be changed by The Great Repeal Act? How much time will Parliament be given to discussing it? How much time is that for each law change?

Brexit questions, 5: What value of tariffs do we collect now on imports to the UK? Which countries give rise to the top 10 payments? Are we planning new trade deals with any of them? What will the impact on revenue be?

Brexit questions, 6: How many EU nationals work in the UK now? How many are planned for 2020? How will those EU nationals wanting to work in the NHS then apply?

Brexit questions, 7: How many EU nationals work in UK universities now? How many are planned for 2020? How will those EU nationals wanting to work in our universities then apply?

Brexit questions, 8: What is the expected impact of UK residents forced to return to live in this country from EU on the UK housing shortage?

Brexit questions, 9: How many additional border staff will be needed after Brexit? How much will that cost? If a balanced budget is sought what budget will be cut to pay for this?

Brexit questions, 10: How many additional staff will be required at HMRC to process tariff and trade data as a result of Brexit? How much revenue will they raise? What will this cost?

Brexit questions, 11: How much will the cost to business be of having to manage multiple trade deals and tariff arrangements?

Brexit questions, 12: The Supreme Court said they could not rule on relationships with Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. What, though, will be done to keep then in the Union?

Brexit questions, 13: How much will a visa for a UK person to visit Europe cost after Brexit?

Brexit questions, 14: Why is free movement of people with the US good news when it isn’t with the EU when both would be conditions of trade deals.

Brexit questions, 15: How much will it cost to create UK regulatory agencies to replace all those we have previously relied on in the EU?

Brexit questions, 16: How much will the Brexit departments and those staff engaged in Brexit in other departments cost between now and 2020, split down by year?

Source: Tax Research UK » Brexit questions that the government could and should answer

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3 thoughts on “Brexit questions that the government could and should answer | Tax Research UK

  1. Jenny Hambidge

    Excellent, Mike. All of these questions plus their answers should be in the White Paper. How many decades will it take to recoup the expenses of Brexit and make a surplus for our economy?

  2. Harry

    Are there people out there that still believe “Brexit” will happen? The Europa Nomenclatura are rushing at breakneck speed to bind the British people and their country into full military union, which the useless Michael Fallon has even admitted:-

    http://www.ukcolumn.org/article/michael-fallon-confirms-eu-military-integration

    We either have a bifurcated Government at war with each other as factions do their own thing or the cloud of Government by lies is smothering.

    These Islands have never suffered under such bad governance since the 1930’s, I hope with all of my heart that people wake up before it is too late.

  3. NMac

    I suspect that the answers to these very pertinent questions will not be answered, for to do so would almost certainly show just how bare is the Brexit cupboard.

Comments are closed.