‘What country is it that stops people becoming nurses by charging them too much? Tory Britain.’

Bursaries for student nurses are being abolished [Image: Getty].

Jeremy Corbyn lays out the facts in Leamington Spa:

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4 thoughts on “‘What country is it that stops people becoming nurses by charging them too much? Tory Britain.’

  1. Andy C

    Recently I’ve been looking at a change of career and looked at how much debt I would get into by retraining as a mental health nurse by doing the BSc (Honours) Nursing (Mental Health) at Sheffield Hallam University

    The course costs were per annum are £9,250 (so for 3 years £27,750 )

    With access to a possible £8,430 loan per annum for help with living expenses (so for 3 years £25,290 )

    So after 3 years a rough total for debt accrued would be £53,040

    I have to say that this is obscene.

    I know the following isn’t accurate due to changes in the cost of the pound and all kinds of other things but to give it some kind of context it’s more than my parent’s first mortgage cost in the 1970’s.

  2. NMac

    All part of the nasty Tory plan to dismantle the NHS and to punish people who dare to oppose them.

  3. Barry Davies

    Decades ago, having been made redundant, when metal box went belly up, because of not being able to compete anymore in the early 80’s I signed up to do what I had wanted to do anyway become a RMN, aged 26 I took a 150% wage cut although not entirely by choice, and worked for 3 years 12 weeks to get my registration, worked being the operative word, because we learned our trade at the coal face with additional theory sessions along the way. The eu’s freedom of movement forced students into university, which has drastically reduced late joiners to the profession, and the overall numbers of nurses being trained, add to that the so called (no)care in the community, which lead to many nurses either leaving or like me retraining as a general nurse, and you have a dearth of British trained nurses.

    1. Andy C

      I thought it was Project 2000 brought in during the early 90’s which shaped nursing as we know it today. It had nothing to do with immigration. The idea was that nurses were/are professionals so their education needed to be that to match other professionals so rather than on the job training, theoretical lecture based training took over.

      http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/commentators/christina-patterson/reforms-in-the-1990s-were-supposed-to-make-nursing-care-better-instead-theres-a-widely-shared-sense-7631273.html

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