Were you as horrified as I was when The Guardian – of all news outlets – headlined an article with the words, “Hospitals are massively overspending. But more money is not the answer”?

Hospitals are not “massively overspending”. If the money is being used to save lives, then they are not overspending at all.

The only people who could possibly imagine that a health service can overspend are Tories – because they are backward in their priorities; they revere money and consider human lives to be worthless.

NHS Million fixed the Guardian headline for its errant editors:

Some armchair critics might want to suggest that hospitals are overspending because there isn’t enough money in the UK economy at the moment. This is, at best, a mistake. There is plenty of money – it is held in offshore bank accounts and other financial instruments owned by rich supporters of the Conservative Party.

Anybody who wants to say that these people are entitled to the money they have should be reminded that wages have been pushed below subsistence level by the Tories over the last eight years. Fatcat businesspeople with offshore accounts, trusts or whatever should be made to pay a living wage to all employees before taking their massive cut to HMRC for a proper assessment of their tax obligation. Then they can do whatever they want with what’s left.

The increased amount of money that would then go to the Treasury could be used to reverse some of the nightmare statistics the Mirror published about Jeremy Hunt’s nightmarish career as the UK’s longest-serving Health Secretary.

A cursory glance at it shows that his decisions make no sense. Waiting times have increased hugely, yet Mr Hunt has cut the number of hospital beds by 7,000. This cannot make sense to anybody.

So to news outlets like The Guardian, our message should be clear:

Don’t give us your pro-Tory propaganda, please! Try reporting the facts instead.

Jeremy Hunt [became] the longest-serving Health Secretary in our history on Sunday.

And stats show his calamitous 2,099-day reign has seen soaring waiting times, cancelled ops, bed shortages and a 100,000 staff shortfall.

Mr Hunt was appointed on September 4 2012.

Since then the number of people waiting more than four hours in A&E is up 842 per cent. Then 9,022 people waited more than four hours – in March it was 76,054.

An extra 1.4 million people are on NHS waiting lists compared to 2012.

And the number of people waiting over two weeks for urgent cancer treatment has more than doubled from 53,738 in 2013 to 113,373 in 2018.

There are 7,000 fewer beds available in NHS hospitals now than in 2012

And bed occupancy at the end of last year was the highest recorded.

Stats also show the waiting time measure for consultant-led treatment is at 22 weeks, and has been above the 18-week target since early 2016.

Source: Revealed: Stats of Jeremy Hunt’s calamitous 2,099-day reign as he becomes UK’s longest-serving Health Secretary – Mirror Online


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