Hammond wants us to think social care is under control because he’s watching it as it fails

Mr Hammond failed to earmark any of the additional £23bn for infrastructure on social care [Image: Getty].

Mr Hammond failed to earmark any of the additional £23bn for infrastructure on social care [Image: Getty].


The part of this that really infuriates is that Mr Hammond responds to all criticisms, not just those from his own party, in the same way:

“I know it’s tempting for honourable members opposite to paint everything as a crisis or a looming chaos. It’s not the case. We have a programme of investment in the NHS, it is being delivered and we’ll keep a very close eye on the way it’s delivered.”

But we know how that plays out.

He delivers the investment he promised – either in full or in part; in either case it won’t be enough.

The service falls into exactly the chaos he denied would happen.

And then he says, “Despite our best efforts, the publicly-funded service has failed. Nobody could have saved it [a lie]. We are therefore turning it over to private capital, who will run it for profit.”

See if he doesn’t.

Philip Hammond’s failure to inject money into social care means the services remain in “crisis” and could result in a “human cost”, according to the leader of a Conservative council.

The criticism comes after Mr Hammond, the Chancellor, failed to earmark any of the additional £23bn for infrastructure on social care at his first Autumn Statement in the Commons. His only mention of the NHS was to repeat a pledge to provide the health service with £10bn in extra funding by the end of the decade.

Izzie Secombe, the Tory leader of Warwickshire County Council and a member of the Local Government Association, said councils, care providers, charities and the NHS have all urged Mr Hammond to use his first financial statement as Chancellor to properly fund adult social care.

The former Conservative pensions minister Baroness Altmann added: “We need urgent recognition of the disgraceful state of social care.”

Source: Chancellor’s failure to fund social care will have ‘human cost’, says leader of Tory council | The Independent

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7 thoughts on “Hammond wants us to think social care is under control because he’s watching it as it fails

  1. Readerbythesea

    He isn’t bothered because this is all going to plan. We are now living in a semi fascist state where poor, old, sick or disabled are left to die unless they have a private income or family to financially support them.

  2. casalealex

    “His only mention of the NHS was to repeat a pledge to provide the health service with £10bn in extra funding by the end of the decade.”

    Extra funding? On top of what? What is the actual yearly funding of the NHS?

    “…..by the end of the decade….” = which means £2bn a year…..

  3. Rupert Mitchell (@rupert_rrl)

    I wonder just how many Tory MPs actually use the NHS for treatment. I imagine very few as they will nearly all want to further the nests of their private health providers and not have to wait for days or weeks for hospital appointments.

  4. Justin

    The problem is that they don’t fund the Nhs properly despite the lies on the pretty red bus and they cannot see the actual blatantly obvious facts that it is there own policies that are causing a issue with the Nhs, bed occupancy for example, as you quite rightly pointed out malnutrition in another blog, that just the tip, worsening conditions to people with Mh issues, some who are in whatever terminology you want it, I use there buzzphrase (JAM), they might have been Jam then they had a wca assessment, had to go to tribunal, then ended up being put back into the community care system or re-admitted, does that sound familiar, it may not in tory world of not living on the right planet, but in boots on the ground world there is a considerable element of truth and a wealth of evidence carried out by people who know what there doing, not some unqualified bunch of quacks that somehow manage to called themselves professionals and are run by three equally dubious who actually try and kid people like me that they have done sova training, are crb2 cleared, are mental health qualified ( a sports Physiotherapist doing a bi-polar assessment for example)

    is there a solution well, maybe, put all of these so called brilliant people at decision making level, get hold of ids and his fun loving brigade and stick the lot of them working in a mental health unit for a couple of weeks, then throw them out into community care and then let them do the nightshift homeless street part, after all they have a nice long summer recess, let’s see them lead by example and learn how there policies are really impacting in real world, are they man enough I doub’t it

  5. Barry Davies

    Unfortunately the whole idea of social care is based on a social position that hasn’t existed for over 50 years, that of a nuclear family basis, where social care works is where there is a family member, quite often a Wife Mother Sister or Daughter, available to look after the person needing care at home. This support thanks to the need to move home to find work has long since become untenable as families have become fragmented across the nation or the world, and with the draconian attack on the welfare state allied with a massive loss of hospital beds has become untenable. These days women have to work to either support or help to support their families whether they want to or not, as such are not as available to care for a person at home. It would appear however that the government fails to understand just how much society has changed, not least due to their behaviour.

  6. mohandeer

    ” We have a programme of investment in the NHS, it is being delivered and we’ll keep a very close eye on the way it’s delivered.”(Mind your own business who pays for my rose garden) Hammond.
    “A programme of investment”? What? Where? When?

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