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Therese Coffey – as she was described when David Cameron was prime minister.

Therese Coffey has been announced as the new Tory Work and Pensions secretary, after the dramatic resignation of Amber Rudd from the cabinet and the Conservative Party on September 7.

The mainstream news media have been describing her according to her voting preference in the EU referendum: remainer.

But the rest of us need completely different information – her voting record as a member of Parliament.

And it makes discouraging reading.

Data from TheyWorkForYou.com shows Ms Coffey…

Consistently voted against raising benefits at least in line with prices, preferring instead to vote for a reduction in spending on benefits.

Consistently voted against paying higher benefits over longer periods for those unable to work due to illness or disability.

Consistently voted for reducing housing benefit for social tenants deemed to have excess bedrooms (which Labour describe as the “bedroom tax”).

And she consistently voted for making local councils responsible for helping those in financial need afford their council tax – unloading the burden created by her party’s tax cuts onto councils, most likely those run by other parties – and reducing the amount spent on such support so that those councils would not be able to provide it properly.

What a charmer!

Labour’s Stella Creasy fell foul of left-leaning media when she was found to have been socialising with Ms Coffey after fellow Labour MP Laura Pidcock said Labour MPs should not “hang out with Tory women” who are “no friends of mine” and “an enemy to lots of women”.

With a voting record like the above, it is easy to understand why she provoked such indignation.

And now Ms Coffey is running the government department responsible for Universal Credit, disability and sickness benefits, and pensions.

Previous incumbents of that office have put these vulnerable people in an increasingly precarious situation. Will Ms Coffey reverse that situation?

Based on the above information, what do you think?

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