New Labour leader is Keir Starmer: the party is doomed

Poser: this image of Keir Starmer suggests that he supports the right-wing idea that it is better to present the appearance of a leader than to actually be one.

This is a disaster for socialism: Keir Starmer has been elected leader of the Labour Party.

Make no mistake about this – he will never be the UK’s prime minister.

His job will be to ensure that no socialist ever gets to be the UK’s prime minister.

Expect moves back to the arid centre ground of politics; expect more capitulation to the pro-Israel lobby (that masquerades as crusaders against anti-Semitism) and less support for oppressed peoples across the world like Palestinians.

Expect the ejection of socialist policies like renationalisation of our national utiities in favour of more privatisation.

Expect a purge of Labour members who joined in support of Jeremy Corbyn and socialism. Labour is likely to haemorrhage members in any case, becoming another minority-interest group like the Tories.

So expect weakness in the face of Boris Johnson and his Conservatives.

What a tragedy.

Have YOU donated to my crowdfunding appeal, raising funds to fight false libel claims by TV celebrities who should know better? These court cases cost a lot of money so every penny will help ensure that wealth doesn’t beat justice.

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14 thoughts on “New Labour leader is Keir Starmer: the party is doomed

  1. SteveH

    A very decisive victory for Keir Starmer that exceeded Corbyn’s victory in 2015.
    As for your comments above, time will tell.

  2. trev

    What is Starmer’s position on Universal Credit and on the Tory welfare reforms in general? Where does he stand on UBI ? Benefit Sanctions? I suppose we’ll have to wait and see.

  3. Jeffrey Davies

    You can bet the race was fixed has far to many wouldn’t have voted for this person now labour is doomed to walk another Tory path

  4. Neville

    Labour were already doomed before the leadership election. Despite the government mishandling the virus crisis, many people thought they were doing a GOOD JOB (!).

  5. David Bacon

    Well, Mike, it hasn’t taken you long to rubbish Labour’s democratically elected new leader, Starmer, elected with 56% of the vote. The left really needs people like you. Labour is a democratic socialist party, remember. Sadly, the British working class have many conservative and reactionary traits and, in my constituency, Sheffield Hallam, we recently, against the national trend and given the previous incumbent, elected a Labour MP. Hallam is a solidly middle class constituency. It’s the middle class, now, and the younger generation who vote Labour and, since I might be middle class today, I have a solid working class background and, even back in 1951, when I started work on the shop floor in British Railways Doncaster workshops: I stayed on the shop floor for 15 years, I was surprised that there was a considerable minority of working men who voted conservative and were anti trade union. Doncaster, in those days had a conservative MP: Anthony Barber, Chancellor of the Exchequer.

    Sadly, Corbyn’s brand of socialism didn’t play well and let a buffoon, a man whose shortcomings are legion, become our present Prime Minister. I know you’re not a Blairite, nor am I, but I’d welcome him or Brown back with open arms when I think about the quality of his successors, Cameron, May and now Johnson. It’s a sad commentary, but I’m afraid that our rabid, right wing media would have had a field day with the estimable Ms Long Bailey – they’ll find Starmer a tougher nut to crack.

    1. Mike Sivier Post author

      No, they won’t try to crack Starmer because he’s exactly what they want – a placeholder to keep socialism out of Number 10.

      I take it your disappointment with the previous incumbent at Sheffield Hallam is with Labour’s MP from 2017, who I know blotted his copy book. He took over from Nick Clegg who, let’s be honest, also blotted his copy book. So we can see why the electorate there voted the way it has.

      1. David Bacon

        Dear Mike, Thanks for your reply. At my advanced age, (84) I doubt if I’ll ever see a socialist government in this country, let another another Labour government, but I’d settle for any kind of Labour government. The Labour MP who was elected in place of Clegg, Jarod O’Mara, was a bitter disappointment and I don’t think anybody knew whether he stood to the left, centre or right of the party. On the few occasions I wrote to him his answers either came from a machine or were just casually despatched to me with little of substance in them. I know he had cerebral palsy, but that hardly accounts for his behaviour. He had been, I think, a small time night club owner and I’d always want somebody from a different background as a Labour MP. I might sound old fashioned, but I’d always want an MP to dress and look the part – his appearance in an ill-fitting suit and T shirt gave more and more ammunition to his detractors who would say, “elect Labour, and this is the sort of scruff you get”. His attitude to women was brutal and appalling. Clegg’s role in the Cameron coalition still has me spitting blue fire, too. But, at last we now have a sensible young woman as our MP who, I’m sure, will represent us with distinction.

        In my youth I was a Bevanite and, I’d guess, I’m one of a diminishing band who actually remember hearing Nye Bevan speak at a Durham Miners’ Gala, a.k.a. Durham Big Meeting. My father, a Durham miner took me all the way from Doncaster to hear him. It sickens me to hear these tories and their hypocritical praise for the NHS staff whose work has been so heavily handicapped, even sabotaged, over the years by governments from Thatcher’s onwards.

  6. David Bacon

    After the shenanigans with Jared O’Mara most of us in the Labour Part thought we had blown our chance of establishing Sheffield Hallam as a Labour seat. We elected Olivia Blake against the odds of a typical Lib Dem campaign of lies, bluster and deceit which, in, terms of their stationery alone, must have cost a fortune. Money ill-spent. When I first came to live in Sheffield Hallam, nearly 50 years ago, the tories had a 12,000+ majority.

    1. Country Girl

      David Bacon – thank you for your three interesting comments. I, too, live in Sheffield Hallam and it was good to read your thoughts and opinions on the subjects of the current and historical happenings of the Labour party.

      I wouldn’t describe myself as being much into politics, but over the last 10 years have become more interested and concerned when witnessing the deliberate austerity and cruelty of the Tory party. I fear for the future of the poor, the elderly and the sick and disabled with the present nasty PM and the elite he works for.

      I moved to Hallam 30 years ago from elsewhere in Sheffield, and already arrived with the idea that it was a waste of time voting in Hallam unless it was for the long sitting Conservative incumbent. I was so pleased to see it gradually change. As Hallam itself hasn’t changed in terms of class/status/jobs, it must mean the people there can see the truth of what is happening in the country, and having lost Jared (thank goodness) are still keen to believe in Labour.

      Thank you David, for seeing the truth.

  7. Growing Flame

    Those who elected Starmer, thinking that he cannot be smeared the way Corbyn was, are in for a shock.
    The Tory Press mounted a two pronged attack on Corbyn. Left-wing or progressive voters were weened away from Labour by endless reference to anti-semitism which, mysteriously, never seemed to get dealt-with despite Labour’s desperate efforts.
    Centrist voters were put off Labour by smears about Corbyn being a terrorist sympathiser or, even, a Czech spy.

    The two pronged attack on Starmer will stem from his time at the head of the Crown Prosecution Service. Progressive voters will be regaled with tales of the vindictive nature of his decisions, leading to long prison sentences and miscarriages of justice.
    On the other hand, centrist and right-wing voters will read endless stories about how “soft on criminals” he was. And that a Starmer government will practically invite burglars into every home.
    He is NOT the safe candidate who can’t be given the Corbyn treatment.
    He won’t even save himself by moving to the Right and trying to block the radical policies that this country needs. It will never be enough.

    He will have a gun to his head all the time. Step out of line with the Establishment and they will destroy him.
    Will he stand up to them?
    Someone once said that the Right wing will stop chasing you when you stop running.
    I fear that Starmer will resume the Labour centrist cringe, backing down when challenged, apologising for our policies, trying to explain away difficult decisions, and trying, in vain, to placate the Establishment’s media.

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