After Partygate: public bring their own boos to Boris Johnson’s jubilee party

As a man who hates being disliked, the reaction of the public when Boris Johnson arrived at – and departed from – the Queen’s platinum jubilee thanksgiving service may sting him more than his Partygate fine.

Let’s watch – and listen to – what happened. Here’s Johnson’s arrival:

Labour leader Keir Starmer turned up a few minutes later – and the crowd remained quiet for him.

But when Johnson left at the end of the service, the jeering had become markedly louder:

Or do you think it’s just that the media microphones were closer to the crowd?

If so, you may be confused by the BBC’s coverage, which muted the catcalls later. Skwawkbox demonstrates this on video, here:

Johnson has been trying to brazen out the backlash against him after being fined for attending one party at Downing Street during the Covid-19 lockdowns that forbade any such events from taking place, and the Sue Gray report that showed he attended many more parties than just one.

His cronies, like Dominic Raab and Priti Patel, have lined up to play down the significance of the fines, and of the evidence that Johnson lied to Parliament.

The corrupt prime minister has rewritten the Ministerial Code to ensure that minor law-breaking – like being fined – is no longer punishable by forced resignation from the Cabinet.

But lying to Parliament still carries the ultimate sanction because it indicates not only that a minister could not be trusted on one occasion, but that he or she can’t be trusted at all.

And grassroots Conservatives seem to be pressuring their MPs to push Johnson out of office before the electorate has a chance to push the Tories out of government altogether.

The head of the activist group that is actually called Grassroots Conservatives has publicly called for Johnson’s removal.

Ed Costello told the Telegraph: “I’ve come to the conclusion that he probably should resign, and if he had any sense he would resign before he was pushed.

“He needs to go before the next election, because some of what he has done will put off voters. He just hasn’t been wholly honest about what went on, and it would have been better if he ’fessed up and it would all have been over.”

Grassroots Conservatives was launched during David Cameron’s time as prime minister, to pressure the party into upholding “small-c” Conservative values of “stable family, sound economy and strong defence”.

So it seems likely that it may represent the views of a large number of Tory voters – especially bearing in mind the boos, jeers and catcalls from all those (mainly-Tory?) royalists outside St Pauls.

Depending on whether 54 letters of “no confidence” have been handed in to Sir Graham Brady, chair of the backbench 1922 Committee, Johnson could be ousted in a vote as soon as next week.

But is he ready to throw in the towel?

Source: Boris Johnson booed as he arrives at St Paul’s for platinum jubilee event | Boris Johnson | The Guardian

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