Hypocrisy over language used to describe DWP oppression of benefit claimants

Offensive: Did the same people who branded graffiti outside a job centre as offensive criticise Iain Duncan Smith for using the same words – in translation – in a speech after visiting the concentration camp where they stand over the gate?

This is genuinely offensive – and no, I don’t mean it is offensive that somebody sprayed “arbeit macht frei” and “DWP Nazis” on walls outside a job centre in Norwish.

It is offensive that people are saying it is inappropriate.

Have they forgotten that, when he was Work and Pensions Secretary, Iain Duncan Smith visited Auschwitz and, on his return, actually said “Work sets you free” (the literal translation of “arbeit macht frei”) in a speech?

Don’t tell me that was an accident!

And consider the language used by Conservatives, over many years:

So the Tories have used Nazi language to characterise benefit claimants – particularly the sick and disabled. And This Site is full of articles showing how they have persecuted the same people – just as the Nazis did.

So I say: yes, it is criminal damage and that is a crime.

But it is also unacceptable for anybody – particularly Tories – to deplore the language used without considering its context. It is a supportable criticism of Conservative government policies.

Source: Nazi slogans appear on buildings in Norwich | Crime | Eastern Daily Press

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2 Thoughts to “Hypocrisy over language used to describe DWP oppression of benefit claimants”

  1. Criminal damage? If “not tasteful” how do you describe the deliberate withholding of life support (aka benefits)?…… It’s not criminal damage. It’s an inconvenient truth on some brickwork.
    Note to the grafittist – next time, sign it “Banksy” then it will be called art. Moral compass, going cheap roll up, roll up….

  2. Jeffrey Davies

    We only following orders was the reply daily now aktion T4 rolling along with out much of a ado yet many sayeth nah it’s not happening opening your eyes where’s that neighbour were is that unemployed one who walked off to lessen their burden yet on it rolls now we have a virus to help them to be richer in the peasants monies one must open your eyes before it really is to late

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