After his supporters bleated over Corbyn, how can Starmer avoid corruption claims?

Keir Starmer: he’s not looking so smug now (image for illustrative purposes only, before anybody points out it’s old).

Keir Starmer dug a deep hole for himself when he allowed Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour membership to be suspended.

This Site has already discussed the fact that it led other party members to protest and they, in turn, were suspended for talking about it – even though Starmer and other members of his party elite had been doing the same.

It has been said that these suspendees were not allowed to vote in the NEC elections that took place while Corbyn’s suspension was ongoing – or rather their votes weren’t counted – so there is already a smell of corruption about the business.

To this may now be added the possibility that it was unlikely Labour would ever have suspended Corbyn because he may have taken the case to court. Corbyn has hundreds of thousands of pounds in a fund that was raised when it seemed he may be sued over the Panorama documentary Is Labour Antisemitic? – and he has the facts on his side; he was well within his rights to say the words that led to his suspension.

And now Starmer’s own supporters have undermined him by complaining. This Writer has engaged with one of them as follows:

Hodge’s response is, I’m told, mild in comparison with some of the others.

I tend to agree with Skwawkbox‘s interpretation of this:

After weeks of bleating about political interference by party leader Jeremy Corbyn (even though his office only intervened to tell heel-dragging right-wing staff to get on with it), they are now demanding political interference by party leader Keir Starmer – and threatening to flounce out unless he does interfere – even though the reinstatement was decided by a right-dominated NEC panel.

These are the same people who have been loudly demanding that the party implement the full conclusions of the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) report – which bans political interference. Yet as soon as a disciplinary process ends in a result they don’t like, they come over all ‘To hell with that!’, which makes you wonder what kind of ‘independent’ process they’d accept. Of course, the ‘mainstream’ media is pointing out precisely none of this shameless hypocrisy.

You’d almost think the ‘moderates’ weren’t serious about wanting impartial and just outcomes to disciplinary complaints and had just been cynically exploiting an opportunity in a way that can only be described as, well… political.

Starmer has promised to implement all the recommendations of the EHRC report mentioned above – including the ban on political interference. He may not have done it yet but, by demanding it, they are at least breaking the spirit of the new rules Starmer plans to bring in.

And there are all the complaints that have already been made about those of Starmer’s lieutenants who have passed anti-Semitic comments without fear of suspension.

Put it together and Starmer faces corruption accusations from all sides.

By suspending Corbyn supporters, he may be accused of corrupting the NEC elections.

By not suspending his own supporters, he may also be accused of corruption.

Either way, it seems clear he sits at the head of a corrupted Labour Party machine – with himself as the cause of the corruption.

Have YOU donated to my crowdfunding appeal, raising funds to fight false libel claims by TV celebrities who should know better? These court cases cost a lot of money so every penny will help ensure that wealth doesn’t beat justice.

https://www.crowdjustice.com/case/mike-sivier-libel-fight/


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8 thoughts on “After his supporters bleated over Corbyn, how can Starmer avoid corruption claims?

  1. Kevin Strong

    It just does not matter. The far left is finished as far as the Labour party concerned. The election result did that. So Sir Starmer has no reason to be beholding to anyone. The Mr Corbyn era is finished. New Labour will do the job.

    Reply
    1. Mike Sivier Post author

      The election result was a response against Starmer’s Brexit policy. Please try to bear that in mind before posting misleading comments.

      Reply
    2. hilary772013

      Will they?? I don’t think so, I have fought long and hard for a Labour Government but I will state here and now I will never support a Right Wing Labour Party or VOTE for one & neither will my family & friends or my 5,000+ followers on Twitter.
      New Labour I don’t think so.

      Reply
    3. Julia

      It matters a great deal to me – and many others. The Labour Party is finished as far as I am concerned, Starmer has done the job in an amazingly short space of time.

      I do not consider myself as ‘far left’ just someone who holds socialist values and a desire for justice – surely the founding principles of the Labour Party.

      As a 72 year old and member since the 60’s (with a hiatus in the Blair years) it has been heartbreaking and anger-making to see a fine man, Jeremy Corbyn, pilloried by the MSM and even worse by members of his own Party.

      The writing was on the wall for me on the very day of Starmer’s election, and reached a low point with the payoff to the so called ‘whistle blowers’, but never in my wildest imagination would I have thought he could stoop so low as he has done these past few days.

      Reply
      1. hilary772013

        I totally agree Julia my family and I stopped our memberships in May when it became clear Starmer is taking the Party
        away from socialism and further right than the Tories.
        I’m 70 years old & we will not be voting Labour in any forthcoming GE whilst the Right Wing have control, we have never voted Tory in our lives so my family and I are politically homeless.

  2. PW

    And to think that, not so long ago, I saw someone describe Starmer as a ‘seasoned politician’!

    Looking at all the errors of political judgement he’s made so far in only just over 6 months, it seems to me he doesn’t know his arse from his elbow when it comes to politics.

    Reply
  3. hilary772013

    Mike the fund cannot be used for anything else only libel cases against Jeremy. I asked Carole if they were going to use it to fight Jeremy’s suspension the answer was they cannot it can only be used for the original purpose of the fund.
    I have got my donation back to give to any fund that is started for JC to fight his suspension. Looks like he is going to need it after the latest debacle of being re suspended by Starmer.

    Reply
    1. Mike Sivier Post author

      That’s put the kibosh on an otherwise excellent idea!

      I think you’ve made the right choice, since the purpose of the original fund was limited and it will not, now, be necessary (or at least that seems unlikely).

      Reply

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