Brexit 50p finally pictured after a million coins with wrong date melted down

No – the image above isn’t the new Brexit 50p – nor even the version that had to be melted down.

But This Writer couldn’t resist using the image, which is more appropriate to the UK’s fate than the Tory government’s preferred version, which simply shows the words, “Peace, prosperity and friendship with all nations” and the date: 31 January 2020.

My understanding is that the only part of those words that may be accurate is the date – which is ironic because a million copies of the original coin were consigned to the flames because they had the wrong date.

The coin is, naturally, proving popular with Brexit supporters – with 13,000 expressions of interest in a commemorative version.

I would suggest that it is also a good investment for lovers of irony.

Source: Brexit 50p finally pictured after a million coins with wrong date melted down – Mirror Online

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3 thoughts on “Brexit 50p finally pictured after a million coins with wrong date melted down

  1. trev

    I had assumed that we might go back to Ten Bob notes after Brexit, and the old Pounds, Shillings and Pence, ha’pennies & farthings, along with a return to Imperial weights & measures. If they are determined to turn back time then no point doing it in half measures (not 0.5 measures).

  2. Growing Flame

    Gobsmacking! “Peace, prosperity and friendship with all Nations”!!!!

    Yet we got here due to:—-

    * fetishising war fare , especially the two World Wars but also previous wars against France etc. Turning them into exercises in joy and pride.
    * falling prosperity for millions resulting in the rise of English nationalism. And the prospect of worse to come
    * hostility to all nations. Trade and economics is seen as another kind of warfare against other nations. We are expected to believe that other countries will cringe before our economic might and brilliant arguments.

    Johnson quite cheerfully rabbits on about “our European friends” knowing perfectly well that, if many Britons genuinely regarded other Europeans as friends, they would not have voted for Brexit.

    I genuinely wonder how xenophobic Brexit-voters react to all this talk of “peace and friendship” when they voted for hostility and conflict.
    And how they will react to any “Deal” with the EU that might include compromise over fishing rights, or less than a total ban on immigration, or realising that so much of the British economy is still owned by firms based elsewhere in Europe.

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