#KeirStarmer tries to rewrite history so his buddy #TonyBlair can have a #knighthood. FAILS

Keir Starmer and Tony Blair: this image is satirical, of course, and is in no way intended to represent the relationship between these Labour leaders.

Why do politicians always think they can overwrite history with their own versions?

Keir Starmer was doing it on Good Morning Britain today (January 4), in a bid to justify nominating Tony Blair for a knighthood.

The New New Labour leader was responding to a petition calling for the knighthood to be revoked, that had received more than half a million signatures at the time.

As I type this, nearly 650,000 names have been attached and it is one of Change.org’s most popular petitions of all time.

Starmer spoke about what he saw as Blair’s achievements – but unaccountably failed to mention the biggest reason people are complaining: his decision to drag the UK into a war in Iraq that killed a million people for no reason – because it was based on a lie.

The charitable version of events has it that Blair believed false evidence that had been presented to him as proof that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) and its then-leader, Saddam Hussein, was willing to use them.

But this can’t explain away the fact that, advised to wait for a UN resolution supporting military action, Blair didn’t; it seems he pressurised advisers to say he could proceed with out it, and acted on that advice when they provided it.

And Starmer’s whitewashing of the Northern Ireland peace process is also a crock.

Research carried out by This Writer a few years ago, and presented on This Site, showed that Bill Clinton was the main instigator of moves that led to the Good Friday Agreement. When Blair became prime minister, he handed responsibility over to the late Mo Mowlam.

She, in turn, relied on help from people who were on good terms with the various organisations that needed to be involved.

This included one person who, it seems, was instrumental in bringing republicans to the negotiating table. He had spent years acting as a go-between in an effort to keep people talking and the possibility of peace alive. His name was Jeremy Corbyn.

So if anybody deserves an honour for the Northern Ireland peace process, considering Ms Mowlam has passed away, it would be Jeremy Corbyn, not Tony Blair.

The irony is that Mr Corbyn wouldn’t accept it because he knows what it represents.

So perhaps the video clip of Starmer on Good Morning Britain should be corrected – to something like this?

But that wouldn’t persuade people to let Blair have his knighthood, would it?

Have YOU donated to my crowdfunding appeal, raising funds to fight false libel claims by TV celebrities who should know better? These court cases cost a lot of money so every penny will help ensure that wealth doesn’t beat justice.

https://www.crowdjustice.com/case/mike-sivier-libel-fight/


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