Ministers unveil plans to cut spending. They’ll hit the poor again because they’re lazy

Local authorities and their representatives have called for £60 billion of government spending to be devolved to them in order to achieve £20 billion of savings – a forlorn hope!

George Osborne, who called for proposals on how to make the savings in advance of November’s spending review, will go for anything that attacks the poor.

He knows his party, you see. Tories are rich and they are lazy – and they want to continue being rich and lazy. Therefore they support policies that support their wealth and indolence, and hammering the poor does that just fine.

There is a reason Tories support austerity – it transfers money away from the poorest in society (who can starve or freeze to death in the street as far as Tories are concerned – and have done so since the Conservatives took office) and hands it to the richest.

Osborne may offer a sop to the Local Government Organisation but This Blog does not expect him to alter course now.

George Osborne is to be given proposals from cabinet ministers on Friday about how they plan to cut their departmental budgets by 25% or 40%, marking the start of negotiations about how the government will slash £20bn in central government spending.

The chancellor set the deadline for submissions from departments with non-protected budgets for Friday, asking them to model the two different scenarios of cuts before November’s spending review.

The reductions will affect all departments except health, spending on education per pupil, national security and international development.

Source: Deadline arrives for ministers’ plans to cut spending by up to 40% | Politics | The Guardian

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4 Thoughts to “Ministers unveil plans to cut spending. They’ll hit the poor again because they’re lazy”

  1. Here a thought why not extend settlement terms to all Government Suppliers let’s say to 90 days or perhaps 120 days: The Government might also like to opt to pay not with a credit card but in actual Cash

    I would also call on the MP’s for once to reign back on their expense accounts and refuse the recent pay increases they have accepted

  2. Cuts, whilst borrowing increases?

  3. Florence

    Typical that the effect of reductions to Local Authorities will result in huge variations in services across the UK, England in particular. The devolved budgets become subject to a feeding frenzy by the usual corporate raiders as LAs will be inexperienced in provision, and prey to the hordes of “consultants” who will drain millions from budgets in every authority. There will be much less scrutiny at the local level and accountability. Where I live we have had a LA “cabinet” used to hide most decisions from the public, and even from scrutiny by the Councillors themselves, resulting in terrible decisions that have only been reversed by massive public protest.

    Plus we’ve seen much greater cuts to Labour LA’s than the Tory heartlands, and inequality in funding will be easier too by varying funding for different packages of services. Some are already starting from funding at levels that are real attacks on the provision of statutory services, especially in care, and child protection, and education.

  4. Of course they’ll attack the poor, it’s typical lazy tory policy, can’t be arsed to go after the real people who they should be going after because they all went to Oxford, Cambridge and Eton/Eaton together so there’s no chance in hell they will! They dare call the past Labour government for wasting money, the tories waste money like there’s no tomorrow, especially now, money could be saved if they went after their fellow rich, posh pals and took severe cuts in wages, and expenses; that would save the country billions!

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